Iran Appears to be in Another Round of Tghtening Access to Women's Higher Education

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#1
Women's education and opportunities in Iran have been very difficult for some time. The report from the USIP (first link below) suggests that there is another round of tightening going on. This is not a good sign. The second link is from the same source providing a brief outline/timeline of prominent women in primarily Post Shah Iran. The third link is for the activist site Change for Equality. The Farsi and English sites are similar, but not identical.


Iran Curtails Female Education | The Iran Primer

The Women's Movement | The Iran Primer


siteon0-38e4a.jpg
Change for Equality
تغییر برای برابری
 
#2
God is Great.
 
#3
My God, the injustice, does this mean we can rain them with cluster munitions?
 
#5
The poor stupid fools.

Have they got any idea of the holocaust that awaits them once the news breaks on mumsnet?
They share my happy position of not giving a **** what those pointless harpies think. Does this mean Sharia's crept up on me?

If it's been sent from my HTC Sensation using Tapatalk then I'm probably pissed.
 
#7
The poor stupid fools.

Have they got any idea of the holocaust that awaits them once the news breaks on mumsnet?
IRGC QF will have a contingency plan, involving Burkas and a safe house in the Beqaa Valley.
 
#8
I don't see what the problem is, one of our biggest mistakes was teaching them to read in the first place!
 
#10
Women's education and opportunities in Iran have been very difficult for some time. The report from the USIP (first link below) suggests that there is another round of tightening going on. This is not a good sign. The second link is from the same source providing a brief outline/timeline of prominent women in primarily Post Shah Iran. The third link is for the activist site Change for Equality. The Farsi and English sites are similar, but not identical.
I am so outraged by this ??NEWS?? I've decided to put the kettle on for a cuppa. :wink:

What's your angle on this ehwhat??

Are you one of the 'must bomb the heathen Mullahs in Tehran back to the stoneage'? Or are you one of the women's lib warriors who thinks it is your right/responsibility to meddle in other society's affairs from the comfort of your Berkshire (or similar) estate?
 
#11
...
In 1998, two decades after the Islamic Revolution, Iran was cited as one of the top ten countries worldwide that had closed the gender gap between boys and girls in education. For several years, more than 60 percent of the university student body was female. So what impact will this decision have on the progress achieved in recent years?
...
My God, they must be stopped. Our young ladies are all failing Media Studies, puking up Bacardi Breezers into their drug filled handbags and overdosing on pies. There's a brainy bint gap I tell you.

Even with these reforms they are producing hordes of highly educated tarts that have to wear a bags and so are filled with sublimated rage. As a result they are probably all evil nuclear scientists plotting to wipe the Zionist Entity from the pages of history.
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#12
Clearly, I should have foregone the pleasures of working in the garden with the family and stayed closer to the computer.

To briefly respond to some of the questions/statements.
I support CCM, so no cluster --- bombs.
The reading issue is likely to be solved by 50 Shades of Grey. People in authority have been quoted for many years as saying that the subsequent activity is supposed to lead to eventual blindness.
Stoneage usually refers to Glastonbury. And while tempted, I'm not willing to bomb them either, as they already are and wouldn't notice. Mullah that one for a while, if you wish. I'll drink my Lapsang while you do.
Meddling is a slippery slope and I ski very poorly.

It is a truism that women in the region are often underestimated and ignored. It is also a point of note that women and women's organizations have been remarkably visible in activist roles in recent events both within Iran and other nations. Push-back by controlling access to education, jobs etc. was to be expected. Noting when it occurs and the manner in which it is accomplished is informative. I think that many people would agree that there is a growing visible and vocal disjunction within Iran. Whether this will be meaningful in terms of change and in which direction is very much undecided. This was simply one aspect.

Dr. Fatemeh Haghighatjoo is one of the more interesting writers on this subtopic. I find her articles from the time when she first resigned as a MP Iran and her subsequent incarceration to be some of the most useful. Her analysis from the 2009 election was also insightful. I found her to be an excellent speaker and conversationalist and would encourage taking advantage of any opportunity to meet or hear her. Unfortunately for most of us, she is currently in the US.
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#13
My God, they must be stopped. Our young ladies are all failing Media Studies, puking up Bacardi Breezers into their drug filled handbags and overdosing on pies. There's a brainy bint gap I tell you.

Even with these reforms they are producing hordes of highly educated tarts that have to wear a bags and so are filled with sublimated rage. As a result they are probably all evil nuclear scientists plotting to wipe the Zionist Entity from the pages of history.
Try not to jam the satire/irony button through the keyboard. Appreciated it though.

All joking aside and looking at some of your previous posts, we both know that the general population of Iran is not virulently anti-Western or particularly interested in wiping out Israel or anyone else.
 
#14
I am so outraged by this ??NEWS?? I've decided to put the kettle on for a cuppa. :wink:

What's your angle on this ehwhat??

Are you one of the 'must bomb the heathen Mullahs in Tehran back to the stoneage'? Or are you one of the women's lib warriors who thinks it is your right/responsibility to meddle in other society's affairs from the comfort of your Berkshire (or similar) estate?
Difficult to bomb them back to the stone age, they are already there, culturally speaking. Many of the people I came into contact with during the half year I lived said that they would welcome being bombed if it meant an end to the regime they were forced to live under.
 
#15
Difficult to bomb them back to the stone age, they are already there, culturally speaking. Many of the people I came into contact with during the half year I lived said that they would welcome being bombed if it meant an end to the regime they were forced to live under.
You only lived half a year?! There was me thinking you had lived a lot longer.

Anyway, back to the thread, are we supposed to care about any of this?
 
#16
The majority of the youth, which constitutes a huge part of the population, most of whom were born well after the revolution, are actively pro-western, wanting the liberties and freedoms and equalities of a western lifestyle. It's always been an underground culture.

It'll all come about eventually, methinks.
 
#17
Clearly, I should have foregone the pleasures of working in the garden with the family and stayed closer to the computer.

To briefly respond to some of the questions/statements.
I support CCM, so no cluster --- bombs.
The reading issue is likely to be solved by 50 Shades of Grey. People in authority have been quoted for many years as saying that the subsequent activity is supposed to lead to eventual blindness.
Stoneage usually refers to Glastonbury. And while tempted, I'm not willing to bomb them either, as they already are and wouldn't notice. Mullah that one for a while, if you wish. I'll drink my Lapsang while you do.
Meddling is a slippery slope and I ski very poorly.

It is a truism that women in the region are often underestimated and ignored. It is also a point of note that women and women's organizations have been remarkably visible in activist roles in recent events both within Iran and other nations. Push-back by controlling access to education, jobs etc. was to be expected. Noting when it occurs and the manner in which it is accomplished is informative. I think that many people would agree that there is a growing visible and vocal disjunction within Iran. Whether this will be meaningful in terms of change and in which direction is very much undecided. This was simply one aspect.

Dr. Fatemeh Haghighatjoo is one of the more interesting writers on this subtopic. I find her articles from the time when she first resigned as a MP Iran and her subsequent incarceration to be some of the most useful. Her analysis from the 2009 election was also insightful. I found her to be an excellent speaker and conversationalist and would encourage taking advantage of any opportunity to meet or hear her. Unfortunately for most of us, she is currently in the US.
Oodles of fancy words that are written with what purpose in mind?

I'm no more inclined now than 2 days ago to become any more interested in the opportunities for scholarship in far off places of one specific segment of their population. I see NOTHING in your words to suggest that you are particularly interested in the subject either.

What I do see is someone using this as a vehicle to deliver some other agenda - whatever that is.
 
#18
I don't see what the problem is, one of our biggest mistakes was teaching them to read in the first place!
In 1070, Omar Khayyám wrote the influential Treatise on Demonstration of Problems of Algebra, which laid down the principles of algebra, part of the body of Persian Mathematics that was eventually transmitted to Europe. In particular, he derived general methods for solving cubic equations and even some higher orders.

And that inverted Bowl we call The Sky,
Whereunder crawling coop't we live and die,
Lift not thy hands to It for help - for It
Rolls impotently on as Thou or I.

I don't think that either he or or his race needed any help from you in the matter of literacy or numeracy.
 

ehwhat

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
#19
Oodles of fancy words that are written with what purpose in mind?

I'm no more inclined now than 2 days ago to become any more interested in the opportunities for scholarship in far off places of one specific segment of their population. I see NOTHING in your words to suggest that you are particularly interested in the subject either.

What I do see is someone using this as a vehicle to deliver some other agenda - whatever that is.
A couple of points.
First, very gently said don't have an interest? Don't respond.
Second, most people have a black and white pasteboard image of Iran. The information was provided for anyone who might have an interest in reading about that issue. No other agenda. And for what it may be worth, I have a long abiding interest in Iran, albeit originally dealing with the Qashqai/Kashkuli.

You may not care to know, but Kashkuli women weren't mice. Nor did they wear black bags. If anything they tended to be as brightly coloured as a peacock. They were very vocal and valued members of that society with an open hand in setting policy. Kashkuli are Shia Twelvers (I know - a real surprise), they nonetheless wore religion very lightly. The government's brutally enforced insistence for settled life and religious conformity has had an unpleasant impact, the full extent of which depends on location and village. Unpleasant as defined by the Kashkuli themselves, not outsiders. They are not content with their lot.

At this point in time, a lot of people - urban and rural - are not content with their lot and not happy with the effectiveness of their government, which since 2009 has been increasingly and openly considered to lack legitimacy. The active and passive incidents of resistance are interesting and according to some mainly tied to educated women. The potential issues coupled to that are pretty obvious.

How women are treated and utilised within a society is a bellwether. The changes in their treatment are important. Iran is under terrific stress from practically every quarter. Most people focus solely on the foreign policy. Current events suggest that it might be a good idea to follow the domestic policy as well.

Or not, carry on in your own time.
 
#20
A couple of points.
First, very gently said don't have an interest? Don't respond.
I have a huge interest in preventing the warmongers in 'our' (political) hemisphere from creating a narrative that the gullible public will fall for. A narrative that 'allows' them to unleash killing machines for all the wrong reasons.

I also have a huge interest in giving societies the opportunity to develop in their own way and in their own time - without interference (however well intentioned) from either conservative, liberal, secular, religious or other persuasion. I am a firm believer that nobdody has the 'right' to determine another's fate. I appreciate this position is controversial, but I find the arguments for intervention in others' affairs, some of which carry significant weight, less than compelling.

I have ZERO interest, due to the wealth of far more important and interesting subjects out there to study or concern myself with than the higher academic opportunities available to a segment of the population of a far off place.

Fighting (from afar) for gender equality in an Islamic theocratic state has a similar level of credibility as pushing fog uphill with a pointy stick; it may have a more 'worthier' intent, but the chances of achieving the desired outcome are equally remote.

If you have no other agenda beyond a concern for the higher education opportunities for female Iranian students, then I sympathise with your loneliness and the lack of direction in your life. Surely there must be more effective and productive ways of using up your precious life than on 'lost' causes.

But, carry on wasting your own time, as you will.
 

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