IQ of 83 and below are untrainable, no matter the resources

Yokel

LE
I once said to my old RSM, who said "There are no Autistics in the Army."
"Sir, you've met them. You didn't know they were autistic and they probably didn't either."
They adapt.

The Second Sea Lord, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, has publicly announced he is autistic. One of the reasons he got appointed to that role is his ability to push through change.
 

jinxy

LE
All parents need to do is be honest. I posted a pic in the RedHeads thread, One of her daughters was an absolute nightmare around her, Me? not at all. I even took her to the child psychologist at Poole Hospital. He never got to see how bad she could be.
 
There is an outstanding book "The Reason I Jump" written by a 13 year old autistic Japanese boy whose autism is profound. He can't walk or speak, but managed to type it out. It's an examination of autism from the inside, trying to explain it to the the normal "neurotypical" reader.

He's written a book, which I haven't.
I presume his IQ must be of a level to please Jordan Peterson, but he is untrainable, because his broken CNS won't let him be.
But- how many other so called "low IQ" people are out there, but trapped in malfunctioning brains and bodies that won't allow them to reach their potential?
That's the kind of thought that keeps you awake at night.

Anybody interested in that book who cannot find it in the shops or don't shop online can find a copy here:

 
EDITED A couple of examples from Hans Eysenck's book Check Your Own IQ (published in the sixties - these are from memory but are roughly correct):
  • Which is the odd one out: TOOFLLAB, OPOL, CKCRIET, GLOF
The answer is POLO because it is played on a horse (but could equally be POOL to a Septic).

Rude to quote yourself I suppose but it is only for reference.

If the numerous different correct answers to this given by you lot (and the reasons for them) do anything they do at least show that Eysenck's IQ tests are bollox.

How can a test be regarded as a valid empirical determination of IQ if all the answers can be correct.
 

Nobody

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This , I think is one of arrse's strengths.

I've learned a few things on this thyread and...have had my opinion changed.

With thanks to @Toastie and a couple of others.

Cheers.

Edit: Not changed per se but.. I'm now aware of other aspects I never previously knew about and considered in jumping to my conclusion.

I'm not afraid of stating that - ive been educated.

I still think you are c*nts though.
 
A year or so back our HR department was looking to improve its neurodiversity stuff. (Basically it had a lot on dyslexia, and nothing on anything else.)

We updated it, and I have edited it down. There are some useful links in this.


Neurodiversity

  • Neurodiversity is NOT the same as Mental health, although poor awareness of ND often contributes towards mental health problems.
  • ND covers a wide variety of conditions and hidden disabilities, which have medical or physiological causes resulting in altered brain and/or central nervous system (CNS) function.
  • These can manifest as physical, sensory, behavioural, or psychological symptoms which are often misinterpreted.
  • As a ‘hidden’ disability, ND issues are often not recognised by the wider world, employers, managers and sometimes not even the patient themselves.
  • As a responsible employer, we should be aware of ND issues, and support those with them, to enable them to work to best effect in the workplace, and use their abilities..


Known Conditions:

There are over 600 types of neurological conditions, which are broadly categorised into:

  • Sudden onset conditions (e.g. acquired brain injury or spinal cord injury)
  • Intermittent and unpredictable conditions (e.g. epilepsy, ME, certain types of headache, or the early stages of multiple sclerosis)
  • Progressive conditions (e.g. motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, or later stages of multiple sclerosis)
  • Stable neurological conditions (e.g. post-polio syndrome, or cerebral palsy in adults)
  • Autistic Spectrum Disorders cover a group of complex neurodevelopment disorders.
Some conditions that are known to affect, (or are symptoms of), brain and Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, include:

  • Autistic Spectrum Disorders (Including Aspergers’ Syndrome) (ASD)
  • Attention Deficit Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD)
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dyspraxia (DCD)
  • Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Self Injurious Behaviour (SIB)


Mental Health issues:


People with Neurological conditions (which are often not diagnosed or treated) suffer from very high rates of:

  • Depression and;
  • Anxiety.

References:

NHS England » Neurological conditions

Autism Spectrum Disorder Fact Sheet | National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Dyslexia

Dyspraxia in adults

Causes - Post-traumatic stress disorder

Neurotransmitters

Overview - Clinical depression

 
The Second Sea Lord, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, has publicly announced he is autistic. One of the reasons he got appointed to that role is his ability to push through change.
This has advantages and disadvantages. He is very good at driving change; he is rather less good at understanding why that change may cause considerable upset and resistance. Not least because that change may be the solution he's latched onto, rather the best one.

ETA: apologies for moderate thread derail in what has been a fascinating and informative thread so far.
 
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I’ve gen seen someone try to check the fuel level on a petrol engined vehicle by opening the fuel cap and using a lighter to try and look inside.
A few years ago there was a fly on the wall documentary called Jamaica ER. Kingston hospital, guarded by Jamaican army, treating a wide range of shot, stabbed and drugged. TV crew comes across on fella in the corridor who is badly burned about the face and nurses cant be arsed to deal with. They try to provide basic first aid and in the course of this ask what happened. Man says he had a blocked drain and tried to clear it with sulphuric acid. Didn't work, so then tried pouring a gallon of petrol on top. Did that work, asked the crew....seeing where this was going. I wasn't sure said the man, as it was dark and I couldn't see, so I lit a match........
 
Remploy was originally an ex Services company set up by the government for employing disabled veterans.
A lot of webbing issue and textiles came through them.
The government of the day obviously decided it was more cost effective to use Chinese prison forced labour
Fixed.
 

Nobody

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It's a good way to look at society, how we look after those that can't look after themselves
Interesting point.

How many old folks homes do you see with residents who are not white or British born etc though.

An elderly muslim person in a British old folk's home would be a rare thing to behold.
 
Interesting point.

How many old folks homes do you see with residents who are not white or British born etc though.

An elderly muslim person in a British old folk's home would be a rare thing to behold.
Depends on where you live, and the demographics of age.
The main influx of Muslims was from Pakistan in the late 1960's. The youngest of that cohort would only be in their mid 50's early 60's.
The older ones would normally be looked after by relatives, in the traditional extended family style.
The West Indian migrations were about 20 years earlier, so the youngest of that cohort would now be in their 70's.
 

Nobody

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Depends on where you live, and the demographics of age.
The main influx of Muslims was from Pakistan in the late 1960's. The youngest of that cohort would only be in their mid 50's early 60's.
The older ones would normally be looked after by relatives, in the traditional extended family style.
The West Indian migrations were about 20 years earlier, so the youngest of that cohort would now be in their 70's.
I can speak with a certain degree of authority (empirical knowledge) that many towns in the North West of England that have a high demograph of asian populace - is most definately not reflected in the makeup of residents in care homes.

No - I am not a care assistant or whatever the role is referred to nowadays.
 
I can speak with a certain degree of authority (empirical knowledge) that many towns in the North West of England that have a high demograph of asian populace - is most definately not reflected in the makeup of residents in care homes.

No - I am not a care assistant or whatever the role is referred to nowadays.
As I commented. The Asian population still have a high degree of extended family care.
 
Depends on where you live, and the demographics of age.
The main influx of Muslims was from Pakistan in the late 1960's. The youngest of that cohort would only be in their mid 50's early 60's.
The older ones would normally be looked after by relatives, in the traditional extended family style.
The West Indian migrations were about 20 years earlier, so the youngest of that cohort would now be in their 70's.
Living in a retirement complex here in the north, the majority of inmates are 2nd or 3rd generation migrants from Ireland, a couple of Caribbeans, Ghanaians, Kenyans and Pakistan/ Indians. A fairly representative mix of Britons over the last century.
 
Living in a retirement complex here in the north, the majority of inmates are 2nd or 3rd generation migrants from Ireland, a couple of Caribbeans, Ghanaians, Kenyans and Pakistan/ Indians. A fairly representative mix of Britons over the last century.
Fairly standard demographic mix by the sound of it.
 

Nobody

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you'll struggle to find double figures of asians in any care home in Blackburn or Burnley.

My point being - certain cultures take care of their elderly.

Others put them in care homes and let others take care of them.
 

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