IQ is Mainly Inherited According to Recent Genome Studies

#21
No faith in this, dangerous ground.

After a series of tests over months, I ended up doing the Mensa Culture Fair testing at a local Uni, this put me way up the scale, like with Brains off Thunderbirds or something. Culture Fair is designed for low academic achievers with poor exam technique, like me, who seem to be able to solve problems without explaining how. Should mean that an Eskimo with no formal schooling would hit the same results as me.

Reckon mine was all guesswork in hindsight. Mam was a Scouse seamstress, and Dad was a violent R. Sigs who died from the booze. All I inherited from them was the ability to do me own stitches after starting a pub fight.
I did that mensa thing ages ago and got an invite to join.
I was bright enough to know that £60 was a lot of money for a poor benighted Lcpl.
 
#22
Being adopted this is fcuk all use to me! I still don't know if I'm supposed to be a smart, or as thick as ****. I'll stick with lower end, seems easier there.
 
#26
Food chain. Bottom of.

Seriously, how many gifted BA officers do we have? Have you met one?

I met
Peter de la Billière

Now, however old he was, he would have kicked the crap out of me... He was impressive. The others?
British Airways?

I worked out, aged 18, that bluffing my way through Sandhurst was a decent move...but I've never professed to be intelligent...
 
#28
The study in the first link used educational attainment as a proxy for intelligence.
Hmm, I've known some very intelligent people who achieved zilch in school, because their family never valued schooling, or needed them to leave and get a job ASAP. Some of them finally realised their potential in the forces. I've also known people thick as pigshit who got A-levels and even degrees because mummy pushed and pushed, paid for private tutors, paid for re-marks when exam results didn't come up to scratch. So the match between educational achievement and intelligence is doubtful at best. Throw into the mix the lack of equivalence of quals between systems, different educational costs and opportunities between countries, and my doubts about the validity of this study are growing.
 
#30
Hmm, I've known some very intelligent people who achieved zilch in school, because their family never valued schooling, or needed them to leave and get a job ASAP. Some of them finally realised their potential in the forces. I've also known people thick as pigshit who got A-levels and even degrees because mummy pushed and pushed, paid for private tutors, paid for re-marks when exam results didn't come up to scratch. So the match between educational achievement and intelligence is doubtful at best. Throw into the mix the lack of equivalence of quals between systems, different educational costs and opportunities between countries, and my doubts about the validity of this study are growing.
Of course there are exceptions and outliers, and nobody is claiming environment has zero effect. However, on average, for large sample sizes, educational attainment is a good proxy for g.

The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence
 
#32
Most, if not all, veterinarians whom I have known (my father amongst them),have expressed the belief that genomes are a very important influence in animals of all types and sizes.

Furthermore, breeders of livestock attach considerable importance to an animal's ancestry - e.g. Thoroughbred - Wikipedia , The Kennel Club - Wikipedia , and British Cattle Breeders Club

Humans are animals; so I see no reason to believe that we are not also subject to inherited genomes.
 
Last edited:
#33
the boat is out on him, surely? He was treading on egg shells in Bosnia when what was needed was some total and utter Serbian deaths - I can not judge, but your views and thoughts would be welcomed. Put the scales more in balance.
I don't think the UN mandate allowed for total and utter Serbian deaths.

And I do recall in his book making some comment about if he was going warfighting he wouldn't choose to wear a blue beret and paint his IFV white:)
 
#34
AndyPipki [URL="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4210287/ said:
The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence[/URL][/I]
We will have to agree to differ, I still think social background has a bigger impact on educational achievement in the UK than intelligence, at least in the UK, and so can't see how you can split out nature from nurture
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#35
We will have to agree to differ, I still think social background has a bigger impact on educational achievement in the UK than intelligence, at least in the UK, and so can't see how you can split out nature from nurture
By conducting twin studies. It's a pretty effective way to measure the impact of inherited intelligence vs environment. Robert Plomin (listed as an author on the paper at the start of this thread) is probably the key name in such studies globally.
 
#36
The great nature versus nurture debate continues - round 43.

To rely solely on genetic inheritance as a guide to anything would seem to be a bit lazy. Your parents will gift your body the framework, fulfilling your potential in any area is down education, effort and luck in no particular order.

Parental wealth can, not necessarily will, contribute lots to your development.
 
#39
The study in the first link used educational attainment as a proxy for intelligence.
Then it's a bloody poor proxy. Some of the sharpest individuals I met in the mob were less than gifted, academically, and that's before answering the question 'intelligent at what?'

Educational attainment is at the very least greatly aided by training for the types of assessment by which it's measured. Access to this sort of training can be 'inherited' along with access to resources rather than genes.

The methodology could basically be summarised as 'intelligence is the ability to answer the sort of exam questions wealthier kids do better at.' It may be a eugenicist's wet dream but it's not exactly rigorous.
 
#40
As I've said, of course there are exceptions, and of course nurture plays some part in outcomes. But when you consider large samples the findings are made out - a considerable element of general intelligence is down to genetics. Of course, the extent to which latent genetic capability is realised may have a lot to do with environmental factors.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top