IQ is Mainly Inherited According to Recent Genome Studies

#1
I'm hoping that this forum is a place where a reasoned and sensible debate can occur on the implications of these findings, rather than a place where such debate is suppressed by either deletion or the howling down of anyone suggesting such things by accusations of racism, etc. Anyway, it seems recent Genome Wide Complex Trait Analysis studies are bearing out what various twin and adoption studies have been suggesting for years, i.e. that general intelligence ("IQ") is overwhelmingly (up to 80%) down to genetics rather than environment.

Genome-wide association meta-analysis of 78,308 individuals identifies new loci and genes influencing human intelligence | Nature Genetics

Some articles discussing the findings:

Scientists just discovered 50 genes that are linked with intelligence

The Heritability of IQ

There is no intelligence gene… singular | Prospect Magazine

Anyway it seems Charles Murray may well have been largely right. If you've got the time, this recent conversation between him and Sam Harris is well worth a listen:

Forbidden Knowledge

Clearly this has implications in the spheres of education, welfare policy and other areas. I would suggest as a start that grammar schools and technical schools might not be such a bad idea after all.
 
#2
It's obvious to anybody who mixes with other humans that intelligence is hereditary, but proving it won't change anything. It's unfair and people don't like that.
 
#5
Well something has to make some people more intelligent than others. Its not a giant leap that the DNA you inherit from your parents which gives you every single attribute you have at birth also affects intelligence as well.
 
#6
Can we sue because our parents made us thick as mince? Please tell me yes, I'll be.... hmm, one dead and one penniless, I'll be, I'll be

Let me look at the question again!
 
#7
Well something has to make some people more intelligent than others. Its not a giant leap that the DNA you inherit from your parents which gives you every single attribute you have at birth also affects intelligence as well.
What about super geniuses?
Just a fluke mutation or the whole being better than the parts?
 
#9
It will depend, of course, on how you measure intelligence. There's little agreement about the validity of most testing methods. If there's any culturally specific element in the test regime, then it's likely these will correlate with some genetic factors, whether there's a causative link or not. If we are talking about 50 possible genes, the number of possible combinations is mind boggling and the statistics to map those against any reliable measure of intelligence far beyond me.
 
#12
Food chain. Bottom of.

Seriously, how many gifted BA officers do we have? Have you met one?

I met
Peter de la Billière

Now, however old he was, he would have kicked the crap out of me... He was impressive. The others?
IIRC he's also an old boy of the same Swiss school, Le Rosey, as Kim Jon Wotsit, currently in the news a great deal.
 
#13
Food chain. Bottom of.

Seriously, how many gifted BA officers do we have? Have you met one?

I met
Peter de la Billière

Now, however old he was, he would have kicked the crap out of me... He was impressive. The others?
Apart from self (in the past, naturally), but in the same vein, Mike Rose was up there with the best.
 
#14
It will depend, of course, on how you measure intelligence. There's little agreement about the validity of most testing methods. If there's any culturally specific element in the test regime, then it's likely these will correlate with some genetic factors, whether there's a causative link or not. If we are talking about 50 possible genes, the number of possible combinations is mind boggling and the statistics to map those against any reliable measure of intelligence far beyond me.
The study in the first link used educational attainment as a proxy for intelligence.
 
#15
I'm hoping that this forum is a place where a reasoned and sensible debate can occur on the implications of these findings, rather than a place where such debate is suppressed by either deletion or the howling down.
How long have you been a member?
 
#17
Apart from self (in the past, naturally), but in the same vein, Mike Rose was up there with the best.
the boat is out on him, surely? He was treading on egg shells in Bosnia when what was needed was some total and utter Serbian deaths - I can not judge, but your views and thoughts would be welcomed. Put the scales more in balance.
 
#18
Inherited ? That's the fruit of my loins screwed. No cash or grey matter from me then.
 
#19
No faith in this, dangerous ground.

After a series of tests over months, I ended up doing the Mensa Culture Fair testing at a local Uni, this put me way up the scale, like with Brains off Thunderbirds or something. Culture Fair is designed for low academic achievers with poor exam technique, like me, who seem to be able to solve problems without explaining how. Should mean that an Eskimo with no formal schooling would hit the same results as me.

Reckon mine was all guesswork in hindsight. Mam was a Scouse seamstress, and Dad was a violent R. Sigs who died from the booze. All I inherited from them was the ability to do me own stitches after starting a pub fight.
 
#20
the boat is out on him, surely? He was treading on egg shells in Bosnia when what was needed was some total and utter Serbian deaths - I can not judge, but your views and thoughts would be welcomed. Put the scales more in balance.
I'm going on the times I have met him - particularly in a non-military environment.
BTW, he pulled a fabulous stunt in Serbia, when he organised a football match. As part of the pre-match entertainment, the band of the Coldstream played, in full fig.
Then the Coldstream free-fall team displayed, landing in the stadium, from where they rapidly disappeared.
There may be those on here who will dispute the existence of a Coldstream free-fall display team ...
 

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