Involvement in politics?

#1
I know that serving members of the military are not allowed to stand for Parliament without leaving...but can you get involved in helping out, such as exciting stuff like writing envelopes, door to dooring etc?

I have not got access to the rules at the moment.

Many thanks.
 
#2
No clue on the regulations, but I would suggest pretty much a NO WAY.

You are a servant of [a] The Queen and then The Government of the day.

I'd guess there's nothing to prevent you joining the Party of choice, making contributions and attending fund-raising functions. But active participation in the processes would be tricky.

I speak as one who got stuck in immediately AFTER retirement.
 
#3
Lanky I went to my boss and asked a question along the same lines once. He asked me which Party, I answered not the Labour Party and then he was happy..... :D

Turns out his wife was a treasurer.....
 
#4
Obviously it would not be in uniform and if door to dooring I would avoid the quarters.
 
#7
lanky said:
I know that serving members of the military are not allowed to stand for Parliament without leaving...but can you get involved in helping out, such as exciting stuff like writing envelopes, door to dooring etc?
When an MP can claim up to £24,000 quid a year Additional Allowance, put a claim in for £250 without a receipt, and can claim £400 a month for food, why should you volunteer to be one of their unpaid minions? Let the barstewards do it themselves! You'll only be spreading their LIES anyway, no matter which party you are assisting. If you are serving don't do it.
 
#8
DigitalGeek said:
lanky said:
I know that serving members of the military are not allowed to stand for Parliament without leaving...but can you get involved in helping out, such as exciting stuff like writing envelopes, door to dooring etc?
When an MP can claim up to £24,000 quid a year Additional Allowance, put a claim in for £250 without a receipt, and can claim £400 a month for food, why should you volunteer to be one of their unpaid minions? Let the barstewards do it themselves! You'll only be spreading their LIES anyway, no matter which party you are assisting. If you are serving don't do it.
I presume you don't vote either? :wink:
 
#9
If no one else beats me to it I'll come back later and give the quote from QRs.

There is a prohibition against members of the Regular forces "taking an active part in the affairs" of a political party. I dont believe this prohibits individual membership as such.

However I suspect that canvassing on behalf of a political party (ie the door to door bit) could well be regarded as playing an active part.

Attendance at political rallies (ie as a member of the audience) is specifically allowed, provided it is out of uniform.
 
#10
blue_sophist said:
DigitalGeek said:
lanky said:
I know that serving members of the military are not allowed to stand for Parliament without leaving...but can you get involved in helping out, such as exciting stuff like writing envelopes, door to dooring etc?
When an MP can claim up to £24,000 quid a year Additional Allowance, put a claim in for £250 without a receipt, and can claim £400 a month for food, why should you volunteer to be one of their unpaid minions? Let the barstewards do it themselves! You'll only be spreading their LIES anyway, no matter which party you are assisting. If you are serving don't do it.
I presume you don't vote either? :wink:
Nope, I'm a Bhuddist and I dont believe in making people miserable! :D
 
#11
DigitalGeek said:
blue_sophist said:
DigitalGeek said:
lanky said:
I know that serving members of the military are not allowed to stand for Parliament without leaving...but can you get involved in helping out, such as exciting stuff like writing envelopes, door to dooring etc?
When an MP can claim up to £24,000 quid a year Additional Allowance, put a claim in for £250 without a receipt, and can claim £400 a month for food, why should you volunteer to be one of their unpaid minions? Let the barstewards do it themselves! You'll only be spreading their LIES anyway, no matter which party you are assisting. If you are serving don't do it.
I presume you don't vote either? :wink:
Nope, I'm a Bhuddist and I dont believe in making people miserable! :D
Well, delivering leaflets would definitely be a no-no ... you might tread on an ant :wink:
 
#13
You are a marine. There is no such thing as speech that is free. You must pay for everything you say
 
#15
hackle said:
If no one else beats me to it I'll come back later and give the quote from QRs.

There is a prohibition against members of the Regular forces "taking an active part in the affairs" of a political party. I dont believe this prohibits individual membership as such.

However I suspect that canvassing on behalf of a political party (ie the door to door bit) could well be regarded as playing an active part.

Attendance at political rallies (ie as a member of the audience) is specifically allowed, provided it is out of uniform.
Below is the promised quote from QRs for the Army.

Political Activities

J5.581.

a. Regular Service personnel are not to take any active part in the affairs of any political organisation, party or movement. They are not to participate in political marches or demonstrations.

b. No restriction is to be placed upon the attendance at political meetings of such personnel provided that uniform is not worn, Service duties are not impeded, and no action is taken which would bring the Service into disrepute.
Comment: It is an interesting question whether activities such as canvassing are truly prohibited, assuming that uniform is not worn. "Taking an active part in the affairs of ..." arguably implies a more influential role, such as being a party constituency office-bearer. True, canvassing is an activity in the public eye unlike, say, envelope-stuffing. If anyone has direct experience of the application of this regulation I would be interested.
 
#16
My request involved organisation Hackle, I was merely asked if I was going to be Chairman. It was deemed OK to be vice-chair!

This would appear to be a very liberal interpretation of the rules, it also suggests that it is probably OK to be a leaflet stuffer.
 
#17
nigegilb said:
My request involved organisation Hackle, I was merely asked if I was going to be Chairman. It was deemed OK to be vice-chair!
This would appear to be a very liberal interpretation of the rules, it also suggests that it is probably OK to be a leaflet stuffer.
Enjoy, and beware of letter-boxes ... linky here, http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=89743/start=0.html , from which source ...
Once upon a distant, as a teenager, I used to do temporary work as a postman at Christmas. Once upon a more recent, I used to deliver Party political leaflets. I have therefore encountered many [and varied] letter-boxes, and speak with some experience.

Having a well-developed sense of self-preservation, I quickly learned [and later re-learned] the simple skill of pushing open the letter-box flap with one hand and inserting the mail with the other. This avoided being bitten if I encountered "stronger than usual" letter-box flap springs.
Also beware of dogs ... there was a silent biter at [43?] Epsom Close, Camberley who bit Mrs B_S and subsequently removed a Councillor's glove during deliveries. The GPO eventually made the resident put up an external letter-box :wink:

Enjoy! :lol:
 
#18
Beware of dogs in Camberley then Blue_Sophist. Nice to see that the UK Government has time on its hands, getting stuck into island affairs at the moment.

Maybe, ten years on from now, there will be a better representation of ex-forces pers, who get involved at the highest level of politics in this country?

Given the current treatment of our armed forces?- Maybe, just maybe, there will be enough retirees who will have absolutely seen it all during their time in, who feel strongly enough to get in and effect much needed changes and attitudes at the highest levels of British Politics.

Due respect to Patrick Mercer and Co. The small minority of those MP's with experience in the armed forces is reflected in just about every "debate" in the UK Parliament - and not just the very few which concern matters directly impacting the armed forces.

Who knows, we may even end up in that ludicrous situation whereby the Secretary of State for Defence has actually served his predecessors.

In the meantime, I reckon there could be great fun to be had and enough fiddles to keep the laziest part-time MP looking busy in the parliamentary system.

A la perchoine.
 
#19
Well said that man, the very limited risk of getting involved is far outweighed by the potential benefits to us all.

It is also a hell of a pension scheme. 8)
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads