Introduce Yourself... and your games

Now French Carabiner Heavy cavalry and Austrian Heavy cavalry..... Only basic difference is the Guidon..... hint.
 
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...but when the French trialled new (ie cheaper) uniforms in 1806-1807 the results were less than desired. For one thing the new white clothing really showed up the blood and had a serious effect on morale...



Yes but that's the French, les petit chaton du Europe :shaking2:
 
...but when the French trialled new (ie cheaper) uniforms in 1806-1807 the results were less than desired. For one thing the new white clothing really showed up the blood and had a serious effect on morale...

On a more serious note is there any hard information how many units a actually wore this kit in a meaningful campaign. Oudinot's French fired on their Saxon allies at Wagram on account of their white coats so I think it's safe to say not many in II Corps by 1809. I see from the text the 15 eme Ligne hung on to theirs but otherwise? Did any of the troops fighting the Prussians in 1806 get the kit in time or was that just blue on blue.
 
On a more serious note is there any hard information how many units a actually wore this kit in a meaningful campaign. Oudinot's French fired on their Saxon allies at Wagram on account of their white coats so I think it's safe to say not many in II Corps by 1809. I see from the text the 15 eme Ligne hung on to theirs but otherwise? Did any of the troops fighting the Prussians in 1806 get the kit in time or was that just blue on blue.
I'll have a look in some of my reference books.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
Anybody know of any ranges that do Royal Navy circa 1850-1900 in 28mm scale? The officer uniforms are ideal for a sci-fi setting I'm running a tabletop RPG in.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
On a more serious note is there any hard information how many units a actually wore this kit in a meaningful campaign. Oudinot's French fired on their Saxon allies at Wagram on account of their white coats so I think it's safe to say not many in II Corps by 1809. I see from the text the 15 eme Ligne hung on to theirs but otherwise? Did any of the troops fighting the Prussians in 1806 get the kit in time or was that just blue on blue.
Nah, after Waterloo, the manufacturers of white uniforms diversified into flag making.
 
Nah, after Waterloo, the manufacturers of white uniforms diversified into flag making.
They'd always been into flag making, French royal colonel's colours were white, it was only the battalion colour that had coloured squares and even that had a white cross.
 
On a more serious note is there any hard information how many units a actually wore this kit in a meaningful campaign. Oudinot's French fired on their Saxon allies at Wagram on account of their white coats so I think it's safe to say not many in II Corps by 1809. I see from the text the 15 eme Ligne hung on to theirs but otherwise? Did any of the troops fighting the Prussians in 1806 get the kit in time or was that just blue on blue.
Like Rodney, I'll have to check the sources, but a lot of regiments held on to the white uniforms for their 'Tetes de Colonne' (drummers, sappers, etc) for a few years after 1807 (as recorded in the Otto Manuscript and some other sources).

In the days of non-colourfast vegetable dyes, white uniforms did have the distinct advantage of being able to be scrubbed clean, without the risk of scrubbing the dye out along with the dirt.
 
Like Rodney, I'll have to check the sources, but a lot of regiments held on to the white uniforms for their 'Tetes de Colonne' (drummers, sappers, etc) for a few years after 1807 (as recorded in the Otto Manuscript and some other sources).

In the days of non-colourfast vegetable dyes, white uniforms did have the distinct advantage of being able to be scrubbed clean, without the risk of scrubbing the dye out along with the dirt.
From the usual reference books it seems that the following regiments are known to have been issued the white uniforms - 3rd, 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 32nd, 33rd, 46th and 53rd Line regiments.

Some of these were not officially scheduled to recieve them (but did anyway) while other regiments were scheduled to get them but didn't. The 53rd may not have had enough uniforms for the whole regiment. Some of the regimenst were wearing the white uniform at Eylau in Feb 1807.

Of course, once issued the white uniforms had to be used up and were not replaced until they wore out and the stocks had been used up (CS95 anyone?)...

Apparently Suchet reported in November 1809 that the last of the white uniforms had been replaced.
 
In the days of non-colourfast vegetable dyes, white uniforms did have the distinct advantage of being able to be scrubbed clean, without the risk of scrubbing the dye out along with the dirt.
You haven't tried to wash much real wool clothing have you; you don't scrub it if you want to be able to wear it afterwards. In practice I'd doubt it got washed at all, brushed down when dry more likely. Pure wool doesn't hold body odour like modern materials so it doesn't smell either.
 
You haven't tried to wash much real wool clothing have you; you don't scrub it if you want to be able to wear it afterwards. In practice I'd doubt it got washed at all, brushed down when dry more likely. Pure wool doesn't hold body odour like modern materials so it doesn't smell either.
Indeed, but I'm just repeating what the report said to Maria Theresa in 1761ish, when she was conducting a review into Austrian army uniforms... ;)
 

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