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International Morse Code Day.....

#8
I learnt it back in the late 70s. By the start of the 80s it had all gone:( Skill fade is a bitch!

One for you @Gusset_Major

She was only a copper's daughter. But she knew how to handle her Morse.
 
#10
I learnt it back in the late 70s. By the start of the 80s it had all gone:( Skill fade is a bitch!

One for you @Gusset_Major

She was only a copper's daughter. But she knew how to handle her Morse.

I learnt it in the 70s and used it for 10 years then left the sea. In 1993 someone at work downloaded a morse program onto his PC and bet me I couldn't still read it at 20wpm. He lost unfortunately :mrgreen:
 
#11
I learnt it in the 70s and used it for 10 years then left the sea. In 1993 someone at work downloaded a morse program onto his PC and bet me I couldn't still read it at 20wpm. He lost unfortunately :mrgreen:
Smart arse:cool:
 
#12
Thought to post this now - mainly to give us all time to brush up on a ( mostly ? ) forgotten mode of contact , as it's currently a load of dots & dashes to me....

Morse Code Day | Days Of The Year
The problem with Morse code is that it took training and practice to become fluent and competent with it. Add in procedures and shorthand codes and there's even more to learn.
All that: INT ZBA K jargon meant that it became a skill of telegraphists, provided they kept in practice.
It's a big step from: "Primary Morse receiving, stand by - Read..." plus there's learning to send with the key as well.

It's not even Dots and Dashes either. Because Morse is an Audio code really not a visual one. The "dots" are a dit bleep and the "dashes" are a longer bleep about 3 dits long. With a gap between letters of about one dit and between words of one dah. In fact the dits are so short that when they run together they're just di, with only the last one sounding like a dit. Such as the; "di di dit" of S (Sierra) as heard in di di dit dah dah dah di di dit of SOS.

Newcomers are not going to learn this in a day. Even if they did, who would they communicate with?

(From Wiki)
NATO phonetic alphabet - Wikipedia
 

MrBane

LE
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#14
Do you think if we brought Morse back on a large scale, just like text speak has crept into daily life, that kids would be stood about going:

"haha, yeah and remember that time I di di do dot dot dot di dot it was hilarious!"
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#16
All I can see is her rack and thigh flash. Would.

This also makes me realise just what they said about how you could identify an operator of Morse from their 'style' which came with the message. Looking at her hand movements really makes sense.
 
#18
All I can see is her rack and thigh flash. Would.

This also makes me realise just what they said about how you could identify an operator of Morse from their 'style' which came with the message. Looking at her hand movements really makes sense.
Looks like she’s using a paddle rather than a ‘key’. One side does dashes (dah), the other does dits (di)
 
#19
This also makes me realise just what they said about how you could identify an operator of Morse from their 'style' which came with the message. Looking at her hand movements really makes sense.
It's called a 'fist'. Everyone's is different. The best in the business belonged to David Nancarrow at Landsend Radio/GLD. When you heard him you knew you were nearing home.
 

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