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Interesting stats from Iraq

#2
"Interesting" indeed. And here's what the Iraqi President has to report today:

BBC said:
Iraqi President Jalal Talabani has called on Iraqis to help stop sectarian violence after figures showed it killed 1,091 people in Baghdad last month.
...
Mr Talabani cited a report from a Baghdad morgue saying 1,091 people were killed between 1 and 30 April.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/4756911.stm
Over a 1,000 killed in one month in one city - and it's not civil war, apparantly!
 
#3
The country has been in a state of Civil War for decades. It's just hasn't made front page news because it was considered "brown on brown" violence by those who sort news stories.
 
#4
#5
From May 2003 and April 2006, between 1,000 and 3,000 anti-Iraqi forces have been killed each month
Wonder what they mean by anti-Iraqi. If anti-coalition, there can't be many left (surely?). If pro-coalition, this statement doesn't do much for "hearts and minds."
 
#6
http://allthingsconservative.typepad.com/all_things_conservative/2006/05/iraq_index_show.html

On an index of political freedom for countries in the Middle East, Iraq now ranks fourth, just below Israel, Lebanon, and Morocco.
How happay are Iraqis to live in so democratic country. Their rank is even higher that one for Kuwait. It is a bit strange but Kuwait was liberated long ago. I'm intresting who does appont these ranks? Can it be called as statistics?

Electrical output is almost at the pre-war level of 3,958 megawatts. April's production was 3,600 megawatts. In May of 2003, production was only 500 megawatts. The goal is to reach 6,000 megawatts.
So current electrical output is 90% from a pre-war level. Not an impressive result. The goal is great, but goals are statistics only in football.

The unemployment rate in June of 2003 was 50-60%, and in April of this year it had dropped to 25-40%.
The pre-war level was not mentioned of course.

In May of 2003, Iraqi Security Forces were estimated at between 7,000-9,000. They numbered 250,500 in March of this year.
...including soldiers on paper. I wonder what coalition troops do in Iraq that has so huge own security forces?

The number of foreign terrorists fighting in Iraq was estimated at between 300 and 500 in January 2004. That number increased in April of this year, to between 700 and 2,000.
Previously I thought that estimates are not statistics.

http://washingtontimes.com/national/20051128-100829-2969r.htm

November 29, 2005

The U.S. is seeing significantly fewer foreign fighters on the battlefields of Iraq, because the coalition has killed or captured scores of terrorists in recent months and is doing a better job of securing the long border with Syria.
...
U.S. officials always have had a difficult time estimating the number of Zarqawi's terrorists in Iraq, giving ranges of several thousand up to 10,000.
 
#7
Editted to add - Having quickly look at the details of the 'Iraq Index' make pretty bad reading, data sourced mainly from the US government and of 57 odd pages of stats the best evidence for improvement is 18 bullet points -FFS lets admit it has not gone to plan and it will take years to 'normalise' Iraq. Is it really worth the money and lives that have been/are being lost?

1. Per Capita GDP (USD) for 2005 is forecast to increase from the previous year to $1,051. In 2002 it was $802.
Not that remarkable when you consider the $Bns of pumped into the country, it could be argued that the sheer amount of money put in should have made a greater impact. - Perhaps some of the grievances are that more of the work is outsourced to foreign nationals rather than Iraqi citizens.

2. Increases in GDP for the next five years: 16.8, 13.6, 12.5, 7.8, and 7.2.
Based upon what? Further money invested in the country by the World or an increase in revenue from oil? Both of these subject the success or failure of the government.

3. Actionable tips from Iraqis have increased every month this year. In January, 4,025 tips were received; February, 4,235; and March, 4,578.
Against whom? Tipping off police is always likely to help settle scores that do not relate to the Insurgency. Tips are a start but unless smuggling/insurgency declines then they are not a good measure of success.

4. On an index of political freedom for countries in the Middle East, Iraq now ranks fourth, just below Israel, Lebanon, and Morocco.
Who’s index? Aspirational or real freedoms. Yes they can vote, but when it is the man with a gun who decides to whether you get to work or whether you are dragged off and shot, political freedom is fairly insignificant.

5. Crude oil production reached 2.14 million barrels a day (MBD) in April of this year. It had dropped to 0.3 MBD in May of 2003.
So they remain at pre-war levels.

6. Revenues from oil export have only slightly increased from pre-war levels of $0.2 billion, to $0.62 billion in April.
Since the price of Oil has increased significantly all this show is how in-effective the Iraq Government has been at collecting revenue. Alternatively it shows just how expensive it is to protect the oil infrastructure

7. Electrical output is almost at the pre-war level of 3,958 megawatts. April's production was 3,600 megawatts. In May of 2003, production was only 500 megawatts. The goal is to reach 6,000 megawatts.
And?

8. The unemployment rate in June of 2003 was 50-60%, and in April of this year it had dropped to 25-40%.
Evidence? – A reflection of the sheer numbers of people employed in Sy no doubt. Where else are they employed?

9. The number of U.S. military wounded has declined significantly from a high of 1,397 in November 2004 to 430 in April of this year.
I fcuking hope so….Nov 04 was the first battle for Fulluja and the first Mehdi Army uprising. More telling would be an overall decline in attacks and there lethality.

10. Iraqi military casualties were 201 in April of 2006, after peaking at 304 in July of 2005.
So they are getting better but see above.

11. As of December 2005, countries other than the U.S., plus the World Bank and IMF, have pledged almost $14 billion in reconstruction aid to Iraq.
See point one and two. Lots of Cash in very little evidence of a return in Iraq.

12. Significant progress has also been made towards the rule of law. In May 2003 there were no trained judges, but as of October 2005 there were 351.
Who’s rule of law? You can have western trained Judges BUT if the religious community/parties continue to exert their strength that is a pretty meaningless stat.

13. As of January 2006, 64% of Iraqis polled said that the country was headed in the right direction.
Okay, that it the Shia and Kurds happy what about the Turkmen and Sunnis?

14. Also as of January 2006, 77% said that removing Saddam Hussein was the right thing to do.
It depends on how you ask the question and it is only significant if the country does not implode.

15. In May of 2003, Iraqi Security Forces were estimated at between 7,000-9,000. They numbered 250,500 in March of this year.
Erm, that because we fired them, how many of the ¼ million are loyal to government first (rather than a political party) and of the army hwo many can operate with US support (excluding Air Power)?

16. The breakdown of foreign terrorists by country of origin is interesting. The largest number come from Algeria, at 20%. The next two countries are Syria and Yemen, at 18% and 17%, respectively.
How is this good news? Who is funding them, is just as important

17. The number of foreign terrorists fighting in Iraq was estimated at between 300 and 500 in January 2004. That number increased in April of this year, to between 700 and 2,000.
Better intelligence rather than a real change I suspect

18. From May 2003 and April 2006, between 1,000 and 3,000 anti-Iraqi forces have been killed each month.
Definition of AIF? – Anyone shot and killed during military operations perhaps…Therefore a minimum of 24,000 AIF have been killed why has the insurgency not been broken, perhaps because not all those killed were insurgents.
 
#8
Chief_Joseph said:
The country has been in a state of Civil War for decades. It's just hasn't made front page news because it was considered "brown on brown" violence by those who sort news stories.
Ah, now it's all clear. The current state of chaos reported in the country is purely due to previous Western Media Bias, which has now been removed by the freedom loving, all inclusive new administration.

It's not due to a an ill-inspired post colonial military wet dream. Oh, please Chief Joseph, share more of your insight. The view must be so much clearer from the safety of a US High School, uncluttered by any first hand knowledge or experience.
 
#9
longtimeout said:
Chief_Joseph said:
The country has been in a state of Civil War for decades. It's just hasn't made front page news because it was considered "brown on brown" violence by those who sort news stories.
Ah, now it's all clear. The current state of chaos reported in the country is purely due to previous Western Media Bias, which has now been removed by the freedom loving, all inclusive new administration.

It's not due to a an ill-inspired post colonial military wet dream. Oh, please Chief Joseph, share more of your insight. The view must be so much clearer from the safety of a US High School, uncluttered by any first hand knowledge or experience.
I think you've misread my statement. I'm not saying that the media caused the violence, or that the war hasn't made it worse. I'm definitely saying something wrong if it sounds like I'm praising the Bush Administration.

I don't claim to be more informed than anyone on this forum, and I have no intention of plugging myself as an "expert" or of being "well informed". I don't expect any sort of reverance, I told people right up front who I am. I base my knowledge on what I've been told by friends who were there (and for the record, they aren't all "septics", a friend of mine who was in Telic 1 lead me to this site), and friends who are from there. I've made the aquaintance of several people in my hometown who fled Saddam's death squads, who will tell you that violence is not new.

And if you want to observe western reporting, check out the front page news about Darfur, or their stellar coverage of Rwanda way back when.


And for the record, I don't really trust the statistics this thread is about either.
 

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