Interesting programme about the Battle of the Atlantic

I've long been fascinated by the Battle of the Atlantic, this gives a nice potted history IMO

 

mcphee1948

Old-Salt
I tried to watch the video but it was too long.
 
There was one thing the sailors on the Corvettes had which even the American sailors envied, and that was their rum ration. Given the Atlantic weather the Brit sailors must at times have thanked God for it. Some of the U Boat crews had a similar but smaller ration if their Kaleuns (Skippers) ignored regulations and smuggled a bottle on board.
 
Let me guess, Sean Bean, in a mournful voice, saying everything British was shite? That's my basic recollection of the decisive weapons series.
They also peddle a lot of myths in those.
 
Good Museum to visit in Liverpool,HQ Western Approaches.Shows positions of Convoys and Escorts on one particular day.Quite eerie walking round,Silence notices everywhere,you can hear sound track of footsteps echoing everywhere.Rooms look like everyone had just walked out 30 minutes earlier,coats on backs of chairs,invitations to drinks,tickets to Grafton. Stand by generator salvaged from U Boat. Quite spooky.
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The Battle of the Atlantic was the only theatre that was in operation from day 1 to endex. There was arguably more un-sung heroism on display there than anywhere else. I have on my bookshelves several books written by participants in the battle and the overwhelming theme to all of them is the battle was not only with the enemy but the weather and one's self with grinding tiredness as a constant along with the tension that any moment could bring a torpedo into your life.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
On the back of this, I recommend the book;


Which I will post a review about Soonish.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
On the back of this, I recommend the book;


Which I will post a review about Soonish.
I read a review in a Sunday paper a couple of months ago. Fundamentally changed ops against U-boats and helped turn the tide.
 
Captain Walker has long been a hero of mine.
The Cruel Sea is fiction, but based on the author's experiences, I gather. A fantastic book and film.

Jack Hawkins tears as he says, "its just the bloody war" were apparently genuine and brought on at his realisation of the horrors faced at sea.
 
The Battle of the Atlantic was the only theatre that was in operation from day 1 to endex. There was arguably more un-sung heroism on display there than anywhere else. I have on my bookshelves several books written by participants in the battle and the overwhelming theme to all of them is the battle was not only with the enemy but the weather and one's self with grinding tiredness as a constant along with the tension that any moment could bring a torpedo into your life.
Indeed.
I once watched a three part series on the Battle of the Atlantic, produced by the BBC I think, in which one story told how the survivors of a convoy attack had to spend 60+ days in an open life raft before they were rescued.
An amazing story of human endurance.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I've long been fascinated by the Battle of the Atlantic, this gives a nice potted history IMO

Bravo can I suggest you read 'Walker RN' if you have not already done so. He sank more U-Boats than any other and rarely left the bridge of his ship, even to the extent of keeping a pee bucket to hand. He died from overwork just at war's end. What a man!
 
Bravo can I suggest you read 'Walker RN' if you have not already done so. He sank more U-Boats than any other and rarely left the bridge of his ship, even to the extent of keeping a pee bucket to hand. He died from overwork just at war's end. What a man!
Heart attack wasn't it?
 
The Battle of the Atlantic was the only theatre that was in operation from day 1 to endex. There was arguably more un-sung heroism on display there than anywhere else. I have on my bookshelves several books written by participants in the battle and the overwhelming theme to all of them is the battle was not only with the enemy but the weather and one's self with grinding tiredness as a constant along with the tension that any moment could bring a torpedo into your life.
I think it lasted longer, escorted convoys continued to early June 1945 until every U Boat had been accounted for. There was concern that the odd U-Boat captain might go rogue.
 
Bravo can I suggest you read 'Walker RN' if you have not already done so. He sank more U-Boats than any other and rarely left the bridge of his ship, even to the extent of keeping a pee bucket to hand. He died from overwork just at war's end. What a man!
One of my favourite books.
 
I@m not sure if it's positive or not, but I've got all those books.
 
For those recommending reading "Walker RN", may I also suggest "Relentless Pursuit" by Cdr. D. Wemyss who was Walker's deputy (he was second ranking captain in the flotilla), "The Fighting Captain" by Alan Burn who was Walker's gunnery officer and for another view of the battle, "Escort" by Cdr. D. Rayner who was the highest ranking RNVR officer by war's end. The last mentioned was another officer who nearly worked themselves to death but his mental collapse at sea saved him.

For a view from the other side, "Teddy Suhren: Ace of Aces", an autobiography by one of the very few original u-boat officers who were still alive at the end of the war. His survival was in no small part due to his skill and that that skill was recognised and despite being a renegade re National Socialism, he was given senior shore postings. There are some interesting insights into the changing face of service politics as Donitz became leader of the Kriegsmarine and the ever increasing loss rates of u-boats.

Captain Walker has long been a hero of mine.
The Cruel Sea is fiction, but based on the author's experiences, I gather. A fantastic book and film.
Try and get Montserrat's book "Three Corvettes". He evidently wrote a series of columns during the war and this book was a collection of those columns. You will quickly find where most of the contents of "The Cruel Sea" were drawn from.
 
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I can't recall if it was Teddy Suhren, but one of the Aces recalls in his memoirs how, at one point, the top scoring Kaleuns for a particular period attended Doenitz' HQ where the Admiral revealed a table absolutely covered in 24 and 18K gold and silver cased wristwatches, pocketwatches and other such things. It was, yer man wrote, fairly obvious whence all this plunder came; you didn't have to be a QC to figure it out. Doenitz waved his hands munificently over the table. "Help yourselves, gentlemen!" Which most, if not all of them did. Yer man added, although whether genuinely or not I couldn't say, that thereafter he had rather less respect for Doenitz than he'd previously had.
 
HMS Ulysses is one of my favourite books. I think Alistair MacLean painted a very accurate description of service on the Russian convoys. Max Hastings, while not my favourite, did do a fair job of covering the Battle of the Atlantic, and the Russian passage in his book "All Hell Let Loose".
Some truly, truly hard men, and some acts that really damaged the image of the Senior Service.
 

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