Interesting one..

#4
Nice idea but, you and @ugly are the rifle blokes, I'm a simple pistolero, to me it look's like the mass of the extra gubbins cause's the thing to bounce around more.

Would it just be a general duty rifle or intended for a marksman role?
 
#5
Nice idea but, you and @ugly are the rifle blokes, I'm a simple pistolero, to me it look's like the mass of the extra gubbins cause's the thing to bounce around more.

Would it just be a general duty rifle or intended for a marksman role?
I was hoping @ugly or @stoatman would know something about it.
 
#6
#7
Didn't the Aussies experiment with turning SMLEs into SLs due to the fact the Japanese were getting closer and they had little in the way of MGs? So I heard.
 
#9
Nice idea but, you and @ugly are the rifle blokes, I'm a simple pistolero, to me it look's like the mass of the extra gubbins cause's the thing to bounce around more.

Would it just be a general duty rifle or intended for a marksman role?
Neither - LMG.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#10
As stoaty said the Howell and Charlton were attempts at producing an LMG via Heath Robinson! They work just not as reliable as the Lewis did! Apparently many ended up in NZ and were lost when the storage went on fire as they say in Glasgow!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#11
I saw this on you tube, to be honest the barrel doesn't move any more than an SMLE would during a mad minute. Most self loading and fully auto rifles have similar movement evident when watched in slow motion. The SMLE's converted weren't selected differently or fitted with heavier barrels and most were designed to be workshop conversions so kits could be shipped to France. Remember the original SMLE barrel is amazingly slim and frankly slimmer and therefore springier/whippier than most sporting barrels about today!
 
#12
I saw this on you tube, to be honest the barrel doesn't move any more than an SMLE would during a mad minute. Most self loading and fully auto rifles have similar movement evident when watched in slow motion. The SMLE's converted weren't selected differently or fitted with heavier barrels and most were designed to be workshop conversions so kits could be shipped to France. Remember the original SMLE barrel is amazingly slim and frankly slimmer and therefore springier/whippier than most sporting barrels about today!
Textbook of Small Arms has a comparison with its contemporaries - it's the lightest barrel per unit length on a military rifle of its era. It's amazing they got it to shoot as well as it does, even if it does require a "build a better mousetrap" bedding system...

What's more amazing is the Fulton's and AJ Parkers of this world got packed ones to shoot as well as P14's and centre-bedded No.4's!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#13
I have a Ruger in .243 with a barrel as slim as the SMLE, I doubt it would shoot match groups but then it wasn't meant to. The beauty of the Lee Enfield barrel is that when turned into sporters the barrels were already a lovely profile and not the mauser stepped monstrosities. I'm not sure if turning down the mauser barrels would cause issue with stress relief etc but it would be interesting to find out! I have a couple we could use!
 
#14
I have a Ruger in .243 with a barrel as slim as the SMLE, I doubt it would shoot match groups but then it wasn't meant to. The beauty of the Lee Enfield barrel is that when turned into sporters the barrels were already a lovely profile and not the mauser stepped monstrosities. I'm not sure if turning down the mauser barrels would cause issue with stress relief etc but it would be interesting to find out! I have a couple we could use!
They were cut rifled then profiled, so there shouldn't be stress relief issues.
 
#15
I have a Ruger in .243 with a barrel as slim as the SMLE, I doubt it would shoot match groups but then it wasn't meant to. The beauty of the Lee Enfield barrel is that when turned into sporters the barrels were already a lovely profile and not the mauser stepped monstrosities. I'm not sure if turning down the mauser barrels would cause issue with stress relief etc but it would be interesting to find out! I have a couple we could use!
The barrel on my 45 Ishy is also beautifully blued, to my great surprise! If I manage to get my work sorted in time, I'll be shooting it tomorrow evening.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#16
They were cut rifled then profiled, so there shouldn't be stress relief issues.
Cheers, I thought you would know. In theory a surpus barrel could be turned down but frankly its possibly almost as cheap to buy a good new or part used one for a sporter.
 
#17
Cheers, I thought you would know. In theory a surpus barrel could be turned down but frankly its possibly almost as cheap to buy a good new or part used one for a sporter.
You'd be amazed how old-school the production was - right through the war.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#18
You'd be amazed how old-school the production was - right through the war.
I was until about 20 years ago when I picked up a reprint of BSA the company at war.
To be honest the "improvements" made to weapons were usually driven by contractors like BSA who could see the corner and how it could be cut without sacrificing quality and function!
 
#19
I was until about 20 years ago when I picked up a reprint of BSA the company at war.
To be honest the "improvements" made to weapons were usually driven by contractors like BSA who could see the corner and how it could be cut without sacrificing quality and function!
Oh, I'm sure. I wonder which factory spotted that only the last 6" of the barrel needed to be properly straight, meaning it could be plug-gauged by a spanner monkey rather than hand-straightened by someone with 20 years experience?

And then things like induction heat treating and so on.

It's even more fascinating with STEN production - the constraints imposed on the subcontractors were basically the function-critical dimensions. How they got to them was their own problem. I don't think I've got 2 magazines with the same construction! I've got a bunch more arriving on Saturday, so we'll see if I can find a matching pair anywhere!
 

Latest Threads

Top