Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

If the rag is to believed - and I don't automatically believe it - she was a known to be unstable and was considered a suicide risk. How the hell was she about to be passed out of Sandhurst and placed in charge of a troop of young soldiers?

Is that what the army has come to?
Or given access to weapons and live ammunition.
 
I overlapped with her at Gutersloh for a bit. I think the most polite thing I could say, IMHO, would be "unstable".
Do you rarely meet women?
 
One seldom heard of the formal sanctions junior officers received...but they did happen, many a 'subbie' just disappeared!
Best wishes,
BD
Disappeared for minor transgressions?
 
MH does not necessarily mean someone is unsuitable as a leader. Indeed, the point I make to my team is MH is no different to physical health: sometimes you’ve got a bit of a knock and you need RICE and a few days light duties; sometimes you need surgery, pins to hold things together and months of rehab afterwards.

Comments like “can’t believe she was about to Command soldiers” just adds to the stigma of talking about MH and are deeply unhelpful.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
All women are mental.
I've met her when I was heroically called upon to assist with Op Morlop (for about 10 minutes).
She was a captain at Tidworth. She seemed alright.
Good parachutist.
 
For offenses the average Jock would have been awarded 28 days and soldier on!
So they avoid jail time as well.
Nothing like double standards to should that values and standards is just a meaningless phrase.
 
MH does not necessarily mean someone is unsuitable as a leader. Indeed, the point I make to my team is MH is no different to physical health: sometimes you’ve got a bit of a knock and you need RICE and a few days light duties; sometimes you need surgery, pins to hold things together and months of rehab afterwards.

Comments like “can’t believe she was about to Command soldiers” just adds to the stigma of talking about MH and are deeply unhelpful.
As she killed herself over (possibly) quite a minor issue, it does suggest she wasn't really suitable for the armed forces.
 
It appears so. Mental health issues are something to be managed not avoided now.
I'm not insensitive to mental health issues - far from it.

Unfortunately, the army's attempts to manage this young woman's mental health issues resulted in her death. Had she gone to a working unit, she would have been a dangerous liability and a morale thief. It would have been utterly unfair to inflict her on a troop, particularly if they ever had to be deployed.

Basic training / Sandhurst should act as a filter and remove anybody who shows signs of instability. If I had a 17 or 18 year old child reporting to a unit, I'd want to know that they had competent dependable leadership and that their welfare was in the hands of a mentally and emotionally stable officer.
 
I'm not insensitive to mental health issues - far from it.

Unfortunately, the army's attempts to manage this young woman's mental health issues resulted in her death. Had she gone to a working unit, she would have been a dangerous liability and a morale thief. It would have been utterly unfair to inflict her on a troop, particularly if they ever had to be deployed.

Basic training / Sandhurst should act as a filter and remove anybody who shows signs of instability. If I had a 17 or 18 year old child reporting to a unit, I'd want to know that they had competent dependable leadership and that their welfare was in the hands of a mentally and emotionally stable officer.
Sandhurst was a far more pressured environment with far less support than a unit a decade ago. I doubt much has changed.

There have been many suicides in the the army in the last 20 years. Calling people you don’t know and have never met morale thieves and liabilities is a bit crass
 
I'm not insensitive to mental health issues - far from it.

Unfortunately, the army's attempts to manage this young woman's mental health issues resulted in her death. Had she gone to a working unit, she would have been a dangerous liability and a morale thief. It would have been utterly unfair to inflict her on a troop, particularly if they ever had to be deployed.

Basic training / Sandhurst should act as a filter and remove anybody who shows signs of instability. If I had a 17 or 18 year old child reporting to a unit, I'd want to know that they had competent dependable leadership and that their welfare was in the hands of a mentally and emotionally stable officer.
Are you actually as much as a cûnt in real life as you are in this post?

She wouldn’t have been a liability, and if treated properly, would’ve likely had a successful career.
 
Sandhurst was a far more pressured environment with far less support than a unit a decade ago. I doubt much has changed.

There have been many suicides in the the army in the last 20 years. Calling people you don’t know and have never met morale thieves and liabilities is a bit crass
Possibly it's a bit crass. That's perhaps inevitable when one speaks in general terms. I will reiterate that I am not insensitive to mental health issues.

I absolutely stand by everything that I said.
 
Possibly it's a bit crass. That's perhaps inevitable when one speaks in general terms. I will reiterate that I am not insensitive to mental health issues.

I absolutely stand by everything that I said.
You need orthopaedic shoes then.
 
Are you actually as much as a cûnt in real life as you are in this post?

She wouldn’t have been a liability, and if treated properly, would’ve likely had a successful career.
Be as abusive as you like.

I disagree with your assertion that she'd have had a successful career. She would have remained a potential liability and should have been discharged from Sandhurst the moment that she was identified as a suicide risk.
 

Issi

LE
It is possible, but you have to become LE at about 34-36, then clear every hurdle first time. I think that the new regs all but exclude it, but it can be done. I only ever knew one and he was a RLC (Ex RAOC) bloke. Absolute top fella. He was the one that told me about the stores coming ashore in the Falklands conflict only to find hods of skis, which they then promptly used as firewood.
We had an RAOC full screw in Cyprus as a Tech Storeman, fit as anything, dagger badged and a really good bloke.
I bumped into him many years later at the Rugby, and he informed me he was now a Colonel working in Glasgow. J.. W.....
 
Be as abusive as you like.

I disagree with your assertion that she'd have had a successful career. She would have remained a potential liability and should have been discharged from Sandhurst the moment that she was identified as a suicide risk.
I hope to god no one under you has a mental health problem.
 
Be as abusive as you like.

I disagree with your assertion that she'd have had a successful career. She would have remained a potential liability and should have been discharged from Sandhurst the moment that she was identified as a suicide risk.
Why? Different people have different problems at different times in their lives. Should a suicidal JNCO/SNCO/officer be discharged the moment they are identified as a suicide risk?
 
Why? Different people have different problems at different times in their lives. Should a suicidal JNCO/SNCO/officer be discharged the moment they are identified as a suicide risk?
In general yes, via the appropriate medical chain. The same as anyone with a serious physical injury.
 
I hope to god no one under you has a mental health problem.
I won't argue that particular toss with you because it would clearly be futile.

I will say this: If a recruit or officer cadet displays serious mental issues (I don't mean the psychiatric equivalent of a head cold) the single kindest thing you can do is to discharge them. That can be done compassionately and they can be eased back into civilian life with as much support as possible.

If someone has displayed suicidal tendencies, they should never, ever, be in an environment where they have access to weapons and live ammunition. Particularly when they will be also be confronted with stress, extreme tiredness and possibly traumatic events. It is tantamount to murder.
 

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