Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

I know an armed robber who subsequently joined the army as an officer.
I always reckoned that there were small, but noticeable increases in the incidence of armed robberies that coincided with periods of block leave from Germany. Up until the mid-90s you could walk into a bank or building society and 'withdraw' between 10 - 20K in two or three minutes. That makes for a memorable summer leave.

The security technology and forensics were very basic. If you didn't boast about it afterwards, your chances of being caught were almost nil. It was essentially the perfect crime, you didn't have to function in a criminal milieu and your overall exposure to arrest could be limited to less than 10 minutes. You'd have to be really unlucky or stupid to get caught.

Quite a few members of HMF were at it, and not just mad squaddies.
 
I always reckoned that there were small, but noticeable increases in the incidence of armed robberies that coincided with periods of block leave from Germany. Up until the mid-90s you could walk into a bank or building society and 'withdraw' between 10 - 20K in two or three minutes. That makes for a memorable summer leave.

The security technology and forensics were very basic. If you didn't boast about it afterwards, your chances of being caught were almost nil. It was essentially the perfect crime, you didn't have to function in a criminal milieu and your overall exposure to arrest could be limited to less than 10 minutes. You'd have to be really unlucky or stupid to get caught.

Quite a few members of HMF were at it, and not just mad squaddies.
And you know this...how?
 
And you know this...how?

Through acquaintance with former armed robbers (of various backgrounds).

Traumatising innocent members of the public isn't my thing. I never really had the predatory sense of entitlement that you need to be an armed robber.

I didn't like the maths either. If it does go wrong, you'll have earned about 1 - 2 k for each year you spend in prison. Better to work for a living.
 
You have to wonder what will happen when he returns to his unit. His subordinates will regard him with contempt. His peers will shun him and his superiors will see him as worthless. He will be unable to hold any appointment that requires respect. Stores SNCO at a range out in the middle of nowhere will be about all he is fit for. He'll see out his days, then go outside into a world where the first thing any prospective employer does is Google the applicant's name.
The words " Static security " come to mind once he leaves
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
I always reckoned that there were small, but noticeable increases in the incidence of armed robberies that coincided with periods of block leave from Germany. Up until the mid-90s you could walk into a bank or building society and 'withdraw' between 10 - 20K in two or three minutes. That makes for a memorable summer leave.

The security technology and forensics were very basic. If you didn't boast about it afterwards, your chances of being caught were almost nil. It was essentially the perfect crime, you didn't have to function in a criminal milieu and your overall exposure to arrest could be limited to less than 10 minutes. You'd have to be really unlucky or stupid to get caught.

Quite a few members of HMF were at it, and not just mad squaddies.
I recall a tale of some REs in the late 80s, tried to rob a bank in Germany. Wearing nbc suits and respirators to disguise themselves.
Unfortunately they'd forgotten to remove their names from the suit fronts, and, when one threatened the German cashier with an army clasp knife it became armed robbery. 7 years each, in German prison iirc.
 
Something similar in Celle when I was up the road in Hohne. Robbery by a chap in a respirator carrying an SA80.

There was a certain regiment that recruited heavily in the London area. It was known to have blokes serving whose brothers and cousins were career armed robbers.

There was almost an epidemic of armed robbery during the 70s and 80s. Probably everybody knew somebody...

It was a major temptation for a lot of soldiers.
 
Was it not one of the guards regiments who had a couple of lads do an armed robbery in disguise... with their own weapons, signed out from the armoury...with bright white butt numbers clearly visible
 

Johned

War Hero
I’ll never forget the SSgt who placed my suppository in BMH Rinteln before I had my teeth out.
I remember her chiefly for her clean fingernails.
Forgive my medical and dental ignorance but I am intrigued. Why would a "suppository" be administered prior to dental treatment? Perhaps in my declining years, I should consult medical textbooks to check up on the functions of the human body; at school I was not much into biology, other than maintaining contacts with the inmates of the girls High School the other side of town. Of no relevance to this thread but I married one of the latter, 63 years ago!
 
Forgive my medical and dental ignorance but I am intrigued. Why would a "suppository" be administered prior to dental treatment? Perhaps in my declining years, I should consult medical textbooks to check up on the functions of the human body; at school I was not much into biology, other than maintaining contacts with the inmates of the girls High School the other side of town. Of no relevance to this thread but I married one of the latter, 63 years ago!
Maybe he paid extra for that bit?
 
I recall a tale of some REs in the late 80s, tried to rob a bank in Germany. Wearing nbc suits and respirators to disguise themselves.
Unfortunately they'd forgotten to remove their names from the suit fronts, and, when one threatened the German cashier with an army clasp knife it became armed robbery. 7 years each, in German prison iirc.
7 years each, in German prison Left with a taste for sauerkraut and a distinct waddle and cross eyes after meeting all those Turks in the shower.
 
Reading his wiki I can't see that he got bust to stripey

@stacker1 You're right! I had two things conflated. Douglas-Home was a straight Court Martial and off to nick. The guy I'm thinking about was in a very different place and some time later.

During the British advance northwards, they had to fight their way through the area around Winsen/Aller, just before they got to Belsen. Some years ago I took part in a battlefield tour there and we looked at some of the actions in the surrounding area. One of them involved two tanks taking on a couple of 88's that were holding up the advance along a road through the forest. I seem to remember that the 88's were being crewed by SS blokes who had no intention of surrendering whatever the odds. One of the tank commanders was a sergeant who had somehow been reduced in rank from major (Sqn Comd) after a court martial, but continued in the same unit. Unfortunately I can't remember which regiment it was or the name of the guy, although I am sure that some keen historian has this piece of info stored in their grey cells somewhere.
 
@stacker1 You're right! I had two things conflated. Douglas-Home was a straight Court Martial and off to nick. The guy I'm thinking about was in a very different place and some time later.

During the British advance northwards, they had to fight their way through the area around Winsen/Aller, just before they got to Belsen. Some years ago I took part in a battlefield tour there and we looked at some of the actions in the surrounding area. One of them involved two tanks taking on a couple of 88's that were holding up the advance along a road through the forest. I seem to remember that the 88's were being crewed by SS blokes who had no intention of surrendering whatever the odds. One of the tank commanders was a sergeant who had somehow been reduced in rank from major (Sqn Comd) after a court martial, but continued in the same unit. Unfortunately I can't remember which regiment it was or the name of the guy, although I am sure that some keen historian has this piece of info stored in their grey cells somewhere.
Could be a battlefield commission, but they were rare. In WW1, there was a fair amount of “informal” commissioning which wasn’t really commissioning at all. Just a short term expedient.
 
Could be a battlefield commission, but they were rare. In WW1, there was a fair amount of “informal” commissioning which wasn’t really commissioning at all. Just a short term expedient.
So a bit like an LE commission then.

Or as an ex CO of mine said 'polyfilla'.

Grrrr
 
Maybe I am taking your point out of context but I would argue (without wanting to have an argument) that forging someone else's name on a loan application is 'trivial'?

I sat on a CM as a WO2 many moons ago and we (the board inc 1 Maj and 1 Capt) effectively dismissed a LCpl from the Army, do not pass go, do not collect £200, for forging a Sgt's name on a few loans he had taken out.

Back story - The LCpl in question had been AWOL (but by all accounts was a bloody good lad) who was wrapped up with a woman, had a kid and was, somehow, in full civil employment. By us discharging him from the Army justice was done but he was able to crack on with his job, relationship and not spend Xmas in the MCTC away from his young child.

The Maj in charge of the board asked the judge if the above was do-able and the answer was yes so that is what 'we' did.

Secondly (due to a post further up thread) we were all accommodated (inc the 'spare' board member) in a lovely hotel in Salisbury to avoid bumping into anyone in any of the Garrison Messes who might be related to anyone in the cases.

Thirdly (if you are still awake) doing a CM just before Xmas (ours was mid Dec) means that just about everyone on charge who should have been on our CM, and I mean almost EVERYONE, did not turn up as they would rather go AWOL to spend Xmas with GF, wife, stereo etc, to then pop up again in Jan to re-face the music.

A factor that was taken into consideration for the LCpl I mentioned above who was 'considerate' enough to actually turn up!
I attended a DCM as the Junior Member at Scampton just before Christmas, almost 30 years ago (!). The place was pretty much locked up and although we were accommodated off-site in a hotel, the Mess was closed and couldn't provide us tea/coffee/sandwiches. The JA quite rightly made a bit of a scene to the OC Admin, who reappeared about 30 minutes later with his wife in tow with a tray of home-made sandwiches, scones, best china and a Silver teapot etc.

I won't (and can't) recount the details of the CM, but it was hard not to feel sympathy for the victim, who had been accused of assaulting two RAF Police Cpls at an off-site party. Suffice to say, a prima facie case was not established, but if it had, the accused would have had a lonely Christmas in Colchester.
 
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Commissions are that: QRs says so. Warrant Officers ain’t Commissioned. And don’t count. At the end of the day, they are just squaddies with ideas above their station.
Slight thread drift, soz.

Is it true that the difference between Warrant and Comissioned Officers dates to the Civil War? The former holding a warrant from the King, the latter being comissioned by the Parliamentarians?
 
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