Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

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My favourite was a lovely petite QARANC called Rosie H. She was lavverly, absolute delight of a girl.
Ok, my turn.

Any photos at all? Asking for a recruiter friend of mine.
 
This has been discussed before. I think officers went to civvie nick via MCTC after a day or so of processing. Also I think they can be held on the equivalent of remand there.
I recall an RAOC (I think) Major in Verden getting court martialed in the mid 80s for sexually assaulting a female taxi driver. I’m sure he went to civvy nick via MCTC. Story did the rounds when I was a subaltern in 1XX.
Edited to add - late 80s.
 
I’m not sure it would be legal under GDPR or Rehabilitation of Offenders Act to disclose the reasons why someone was sacked if due to a conviction. Or to mention convictions in a reference. Do you know otherwise?

I recall being informed that a company reference I was asked to write (long ago, whilst in the UK) should include only the start and finish dates of employment and the job-function(s). That was to avoid legal problems if anyone complained about something that wasn't documented. The personal referees could be more adventurous, though how often the applicant discovered what the referee had written I don't know.
 
I recall being informed that a company reference I was asked to write (long ago, whilst in the UK) should include only the start and finish dates of employment and the job-function(s). That was to avoid legal problems if anyone complained about something that wasn't documented. The personal referees could be more adventurous, though how often the applicant discovered what the referee had written I don't know.
They can request it. Data Subjects Access Rights.
 

9.414

War Hero
This has been discussed before. I think officers went to civvie nick via MCTC after a day or so of processing. Also I think they can be held on the equivalent of remand there.
Correct on all counts
 

QRK2

LE
I recall being informed that a company reference I was asked to write (long ago, whilst in the UK) should include only the start and finish dates of employment and the job-function(s). That was to avoid legal problems if anyone complained about something that wasn't documented. The personal referees could be more adventurous, though how often the applicant discovered what the referee had written I don't know.

That is the policy across a number of employers in the 'city', including 'professional firms'.
 
Or you could simply spend five minutes of your time doing some research rather than depending on others to do it for you.

Right then, employment references are exempt from disclosure under a Subject Access Request as they are confidential between the two employers.


Consent is not required to include personal data in an employment reference and as above the detail of that information does not have to be disclosed to the individual (data subject)

From the ICO Guide to the GDPR:

Confidential references​

This exemption applies if you give or receive a confidential reference for the purposes of prospective or actual:

  • education, training or employment of an individual;
  • placement of an individual as a volunteer;
  • appointment of an individual to office; or
  • provision by an individual of any service.
It exempts you from the UK GDPR’s provisions on:

  • the right to be informed;
  • the right of access; and
  • all the principles, but only so far as they relate to the right to be informed and the right of access.
Example
Company A provides an employment reference in confidence for one of its employees to company B. If the employee makes a subject access request to company A or company B, the reference will be exempt from disclosure. This is because the exemption applies to the reference regardless of whether it is in the hands of the company that gives it or receives it.
Thank you. Probably took the same amount of time to type that as the other message. And that one actually moves the conversation forward.
 
I consider myself fortunate that I was in an Army that had no female officers( apart from WRAC)
And the thought of female RSMs eeek!
Same here. We did have a *non-PC bit alert* MO who was female. She could fill a pair of lightweights.
Work elsewhere now, but when I did work for the MOD some of the female SNCOs and WOs put their male counterparts to shame. They were much quicker to deal with bad behaviour, for example.
 
If that's the same WO1 I'm thinking of, then I know him (via his brother in law) - a good bloke when I knew him (Sgt-SSgt).

Re your earlier statement (officers don't go to MCTC) - are you Certain? I'm sure I heard of one or two heading there when I was serving; it wasn't that they couldn't, it was just that there are fewer officers, therefore fewer get sentenced, and it was extremely rare.

There was a depot Pl Cmdr from (I think the Cheshire Regiment) whose concept of discipline involved forcing recruits to strip naked on the drill square. He'd then beat their bare buttocks with a stick. He'd also force them to strip naked and set his dog on them. Nice chap.

Court martial, a couple of days MCTC and then a civilian prison.
 
Something occurs to me. If a WO can be bust and sentenced to detention at MCTC - whether or not he gets discharged after his sentence or soldiers on in whatever rank - why does this not happen with commissioned officers?

What is wrong with revoking their commission and sentencing them to detention prior to discharge? I appreciate that in times gone by, this was “just not cricket”. Times appear to have changed, if newly-bust SSgts can do MCTC, why can’t shortly-to-be-ex-officers? Certain offences, such as desertion, refusal to perform a duty etc (I’m thinking of Malcolm Kendall-Smith) are purely military discipline issues, and time at MCTC would seem to be a most appropriate sentence.
 
Something occurs to me. If a WO can be bust and sentenced to detention at MCTC - whether or not he gets discharged after his sentence or soldiers on in whatever rank - why does this not happen with commissioned officers?

What is wrong with revoking their commission and sentencing them to detention prior to discharge? I appreciate that in times gone by, this was “just not cricket”. Times appear to have changed, if newly-bust SSgts can do MCTC, why can’t shortly-to-be-ex-officers? Certain offences, such as desertion, refusal to perform a duty etc (I’m thinking of Malcolm Kendall-Smith) are purely military discipline issues, and time at MCTC would seem to be a most appropriate sentence.
Commissions are that: QRs says so. Warrant Officers ain’t Commissioned. And don’t count. At the end of the day, they are just squaddies with ideas above their station.
 
Something occurs to me. If a WO can be bust and sentenced to detention at MCTC - whether or not he gets discharged after his sentence or soldiers on in whatever rank - why does this not happen with commissioned officers?

What is wrong with revoking their commission and sentencing them to detention prior to discharge? I appreciate that in times gone by, this was “just not cricket”. Times appear to have changed, if newly-bust SSgts can do MCTC, why can’t shortly-to-be-ex-officers? Certain offences, such as desertion, refusal to perform a duty etc (I’m thinking of Malcolm Kendall-Smith) are purely military discipline issues, and time at MCTC would seem to be a most appropriate sentence.

Any normal short (under two years) criminal sentence could be served there as well.

It would be ******* hilarious.
 
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