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Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

Drifting further. Four of his children (may have been five) served as officers. Ironically, given his father’s record, one blew the whistle on Airbus’ alleged corrupt activities in Saudi Arabia.
. . . . and that one continues to campaign very energetically on behalf of whistleblowers, whilst at the same time determinedly pursuing UK legal action against the erstwhile employers upon whom he blew his own particular whistle, which included (amongst other things) line management threatening him with being banged-up in a Saudi nick, and the key thrown away. The case is steadily moving towards court action in the UK in the near future, is my understanding from a long weekend in August when our little gang of best mates congregated oop north for a few days of appropriately socially-distanced conviviality when the lockdown was eased at the height of this summer just past.

And there's nothing ironic about it, either. He was devastated by the revelations about his dad, a blow that was aggravated by an awful lot of poisonous gossip and speculation among fellow officers at the time who took as read the idea that all the serving brothers were 'obviously' and 'knowingly' involved in their pater's sh!tty gig.
 
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Yeah but... What about those Sgt Majors that cease to be Sgt Majors because they have gone on to become holders of the Queen's Commission and then go on to become Sgt Majors?

WO1 (AcSM and then GSM Londist) Capt. ‘Vern’ Stokes refers... :salut:
I give up.

What about them?
 

Euclid

War Hero
. . . . and that one continues to campaign very energetically on behalf of whistleblowers, whilst at the same time determinedly pursuing UK legal action against the erstwhile employers upon whom he blew his own particular whistle, which included (amongst other things) line management threatening him with being banged-up in a Saudi nick, and the key thrown away. The case is steadily moving towards court action in the UK in the near future, is my understanding from a long weekend in August when our little gang of best mates congregated oop north for a few days of appropriately socially-distanced conviviality when the lockdown was eased at the height of this summer just past.

And there's nothing ironic about it, either. He was devastated by the revelations about his dad, a blow that was aggravated by an awful lot of poisonous gossip and speculation among fellow officers at the time that took as read the idea that all the serving brothers were 'obviously' and 'knowingly' involved in their pater's sh!tty gig.
And was the author of the Army chapter in the Backstabbers Handbook. Very amusing tome, still got a copy in the downstairs khazi.
 
Surely that just means you're on the (General) Staff. Didn't Capt Darling also wear them?

Yes, back at a time the British Army had Brigadier Generals and all staff officers wore gorget patches. Things have moved on since 1918 (a bit).
 
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And was the author of the Army chapter in the Backstabbers Handbook. Very amusing tome, still got a copy in the downstairs khazi.
That's him. Smashing bloke. Two artificial knee joints, and still he did the left-footer's Camino del wossname Santiago Del Compost Dealer a year or two back.
 
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And there's nothing ironic about it, either. He was devastated by the revelations about his dad, a blow that was aggravated by an awful lot of poisonous gossip and speculation among fellow officers at the time who took as read the idea that all the serving brothers were 'obviously' and 'knowingly' involved in their pater's sh!tty gig.
I think there is a degree of irony in the son of on of Defence’s biggest frauds becoming a whistleblower. I’m not going to comment further; one of them is a long term friend.
 

Euclid

War Hero
The first of your statements is as much a symptom of the institutional problem as the system around CEA. The organisation is institutionally inclined to preserve the old, not to anticipate or to prepare for tomorrow.
Because to succeed we emulated what we saw above us. Not everything of course - I generally dismissed as gauche anything done by gunners. And the way black bag jobs were dished our at Camberley has a lot to answer for.
 
Because to succeed we emulated what we saw above us. . . .
And the way black bag jobs were dished our at Camberley has a lot to answer for.
You shoulda seen the flat-out panic amongst the Camberley DS when the Berlin Wall came down (just after the term where we covered Corps Level Operations) and the framework with which they were so familiar started to unravel at the rapid rate - with still a term to go :-D :thumleft:
 
The first of your statements is as much a symptom of the institutional problem as the system around CEA. The organisation is institutionally inclined to preserve the old, not to anticipate or to prepare for tomorrow.
Isn’t preserving the old the default path of all institutions? How many self-regenerate without a complete change in leadership? And of those that do change, how many are truly successful?
 
There seems to be a good April Fool's joke to be had out of this. There must be some (plenty probably) long retired ARRSE veteran for whom a fake CM summons could be knocked up. Instructions could include reporting to a named guardroom on some date for him to be transported to the CM Centre in Bulford?

Also instructed to dress in very shiny shoes, razor sharp creases in his suit, haircut and shave etc. ready to be marched in and out, not sure if they do everything at the pace of OCs/COs but perhaps that could be worked in somehow.
And with Zimmer Frame or walking sticks bulled and brassoed.
 

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