Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

One of the most difficult US officers I worked with was an Irish-American Brigadier General and his staunchly Catholic Irish American wife. They were both rabidly anti-British believed that a diddly-de Ireland would have existed if it wasn't for the nasty old English (they both said as much). A British colonel, who had numerous tours of Ulster under his belt, eventually tackled these two at a reception, castigating the BG for allowing his distorted view of history to have a direct and deleterious impact on operations.
Should someone with opinions like that be posted to a multi- national HQ? Gen later Pres Eisenhower gave some sage advice on this topic '' You can call anyone a son of a bitch, but if you call someone a British SOB - you are out''.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Should someone with opinions like that be posted to a multi- national HQ? Gen later Pres Eisenhower gave some sage advice on this topic '' You can call anyone a son of a bitch, but if you call someone a British SOB - you are out''.
Well, yes, but consider how often you might have seen British officers being unbearably supercilious and patronising to US ones - my experience is that, on balance, they're much nicer to us than vice versa.

Some of their 'senior NCOs' are a bit fragile as well - a number of exchange/integree types on long attachments found themselves quite badly broken after exposure to a Sgts' Mes.
 
Well, yes, but consider how often you might have seen British officers being unbearably supercilious and patronising to US ones - my experience is that, on balance, they're much nicer to us than vice versa.

Some of their 'senior NCOs' are a bit fragile as well - a number of exchange/integree types on long attachments found themselves quite badly broken after exposure to a Sgts' Mes.
I always got on with them well, at all rank level , and never any problem either way. Mind you I did hear tell of one Jock Officer who reminded some US Officers ''My Regt burned down the White House'' would not say that myself. Sgt's Mess is alien territory to them not an NCO Club (yet ?)
 
Well, yes, but consider how often you might have seen British officers being unbearably supercilious and patronising to US ones - my experience is that, on balance, they're much nicer to us than vice versa.

Some of their 'senior NCOs' are a bit fragile as well - a number of exchange/integree types on long attachments found themselves quite badly broken after exposure to a Sgts' Mes.
The only experience I have of this syndrome was at the NCO Club at Clayallee, when someone at a neighbouring booth decided that my accent was that of the enemies of Ireland, and was to be destroyed. My host, a very large Hawaiian of the 66th MI Brigade, stood, walked around to the relevant booth and gave the gentleman a couple of lumps on his head. Returning with the gentleman, both apologised for the offence to a guest, and we all had another Budvar.

Not the same atmosphere in a Reno bar later (now a civilian) when a group of locals took a dislike to the accent, and I and my host had to do a swift runner or get involved in one of those chairs-and-bottles bar scraps I enjoy when other people are participating. It was just the 'damned English' thing on that occasion; maybe I should have deployed my Gleskie glottals.

Unlike many here, I never had much to do with the US military while I was in uniform, but have had quite a lot of interaction with their mining/oily types subsequently; enthusiastic, certainly, but trusting them over any Canadian or Aussie would always have been a mistake. Brits: always perfidious, and therefore predictable. It's the way of things.
 

conjurer

Old-Salt
According to property folklore, the landlord of the old American Embassy in London, the Duke of Westminster, said that he would be delighted to sell the freehold on one condition: the US government would have to give back all the territories that were confiscated from his family when the country declared its independence. When asked what these territories consisted of, the duke replied “Florida”.
 
According to property folklore, the landlord of the old American Embassy in London, the Duke of Westminster, said that he would be delighted to sell the freehold on one condition: the US government would have to give back all the territories that were confiscated from his family when the country declared its independence. When asked what these territories consisted of, the duke replied “Florida”.
1200 Acres of real estate there, not the whole state, was my understanding.
 
My host, a very large Hawaiian of the 66th MI Brigade, stood, walked around to the relevant booth and gave the gentleman a couple of lumps on his head. Returning with the gentleman, both apologised for the offence to a guest, and we all had another Budvar.
He should have told him that they can have NI back when the USA returns Hawai back to their King and his subjects. The thieving gits.
 
This one
One of the most difficult US officers I worked with was an Irish-American Brigadier General and his staunchly Catholic Irish American wife. They were both rabidly anti-British believed that a diddly-de Ireland would have existed if it wasn't for the nasty old English (they both said as much). A British colonel, who had numerous tours of Ulster under his belt, eventually tackled these two at a reception, castigating the BG for allowing his distorted view of history to have a direct and deleterious impact on operations.
 
According to property folklore, the landlord of the old American Embassy in London, the Duke of Westminster, said that he would be delighted to sell the freehold on one condition: the US government would have to give back all the territories that were confiscated from his family when the country declared its independence. When asked what these territories consisted of, the duke replied “Florida”.

A legendary tale, with variations on American territory locations. It's based on the tradition of the Embassy presenting a gold peppercorn annually to the Duke ( RIP ). These are in an open presentation case behind Grosvenor's main reception desk on Upper Grosvenor St. The signification was that the late Duke, Gerald, charged only a peppercorn rent to our Cousins.

At the annual Christmas party which the late Duke hosted for our Cousins, he was sounded out on one occasion to move from the current agreement and sell them the ground freehold and so the tale was born, however, it does have a basis in fact
 
Any of the Officer contingent want to admit to knowing this outstandingly fine brother Officer :) :)

A retired Army Major who set up a charity for military veterans stole more than £160,000 from his mother-in-law and blew it on a casino, a court has heard.

Dundee Sheriff Court heard that Mr Grantham - a designated Help for Heroes co-ordinator - stole large sums of money from Elizabeth McIntosh, who had Alzheimer’s, for more than three years.

She also told the court that Mr Grantham had a number of convictions in England which related to fraudulent activity and had previously spent time in jail.


I guess he is not one of @Danny_Dravot mates either :):)
 

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