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Interesting court martial on the horizon, General in the dock.

Euclid

War Hero
M
I'm guessing if you googled Bracknell you'd be getting pretty close!
A useless turd indeed - one of those choppers who bloats his military experience while camouflaging that he was a loggie. Which is fcking inexcusable - wherever you served be proud of it!

The list of ex army MPs is not exactly a roll of honour (Fatty Soames excluded - good bloke, and Julian Brazier - a STAB but a good man)

Paddy Ashdown (yes I know, not Army but RM) - still a Throbber.
Patrick Mercer (my boss once) bellend
Bonking Bob - (shagging an intetpter! Grow up FFS)
Eric Joyce - hold my aching sides
Tom Turdhat - ex Int Corps. Nuff said
The list goes on.
 
You said your kids wouldnt like boarding school. If everything else was to your satisfaction you would have thrown them under the bus?

If you are talking about James hes a great bloke, turned up about twice a year for COs PT, one time stopping to go for a piss in Aldershot athletics track while the whole regiment paused their run.

You found civvie street to be easy as did I, some people dont, including officers currently claiming CEA with the threat they will leave if its changed.
There would have been a discussion. They might not have liked it, but they would have got on with it. Throwing them under a bus is a bit over stating it.

Otherwise Mr Stacker, it seems we have found a subject we both agree on. :D:D:D:D:D
 
It was part of the consideration.
If you go the CEA route then you have to stay the course and risk becoming that bitter passed over Maj doing a range of crappy SO2 jobs. It is colloquially called "the boarding school trap".
Its serves a purpose for MoD as it helps retain those SO2s and SO1 its needs for the less thrilling jobs. Not everyone wants to/can be WTE.

If I chose to stay then CEA would have enabled it. Without it I was deffo out at the 16yr point. So the possiblity of it got them another 12 months out of me.
But I was also done with the constant erosion of the "package" , schleping from one crappy quarter to another, not knowing where you will be living next Xmas. All at the whim of some bloke in Glasgow, one of the worst of which is now a Tory MP, the useless turd. God help his constituents.

I always kept an eye on civvy street so I was under no grass is greener illusions. The transition was a little harder than anticipated. Its not really much harder than Military life, just different and there are far more shitty managers to contend with. The upside of which is the competition is easier and you can reap far more rewards far more quickly.

ETA: I don't think people realise what a colossal pain in the arrse it is to apply for CEA and much like JPA, any errors intentional or accidental can be devastating to your career. It just wasn't worth the grief. One of the reasons the Lt Col I mentioned didn't apply for it, so the grandparents were helping. (Which is very common, especially using equity release).
I have previously mentioned an RAO I knew didn't even claim on JPA "they are just waiting to bang you, its not worth the risk". I think that says a lot.
Amen - I gave up on JPA a decade ago after yet another MMA audit.
 
I'm guessing if you googled Bracknell you'd be getting pretty close!
Feck! Another common commissioning course product...

E2A he did PCD, he was a chunkie too!
 
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16 years, under AFPS 75. I know very few recently retired officers of my cohort who have taken a pay cut (actually I can't think of any), although the total package might be less due to the loss of subsidised housing, commuting (especially if London-based), pension and CEA. Most have hung out long enough to get their kids through the key stages of schooling. It is made quite clear during the transition courses that no-one leaving the Services should take a pay cut, (albeit that was before this current recession, tbf). But (again, pre CV-19) the bonuses that are on offer in many sectors of industry and commerce more than make up the delta - but you have to work hard - really hard - to get them.
With the very few exceptions who have reached VSO rank, those in my cohort who stayed have recently retired or are currently retiring after a full career. Of those, a minority have found good roles; one or two excellent roles. But most are struggling to find work that really motivates them and / or meets their financial expectations. Who employs an institutionalised 55 year old into a commercial role for the first time?

Of those of us who left at or soon after first pension point (I stayed a little longer to get promoted to Lt Col), most have done very well across a broad range of sectors. Many (I’m one) are displaying talents that were simply buried in uniform.

A key decider in my decision to leave was continuity of education for my kids. Actually, more than education. Our priority was to bring our kids up in a stable family home; no boarding, no bean steeling and no moves every two years. The perceived requirement for CEA was exactly why we left (we were both officers).

IMHO the system of which CEA is a part drives out talent and retains the journeymen.
 
I have always admired your modesty, Bob.
I’m not boasting. I think there are a great many talented individuals serving in the forces whose talents are buried or wasted by an MS system which pigeon holes people into top / middle / bottom thirds and encourages a culture of generalism. There are also many other individuals with talents they don’t know they have, who therefore hang on way too long, perhaps in CEA trap.
 
What was actually said:

1. Officers - Boarding School provided a better standard of education for their kids.

Twice you have quoted this and taken it out of context.

For the benefit of any doubt.

What I meant by a '' Better standard of Education '' Is that a continual education in the age range of 5 - 18 is far better than an education that is periodically ( every 2 years or so ) interrupted by moving location and the child changing schools

Perhaps I should have listed those points in this order, with the added proviso's.

1. JNCO's / Pte's - We did not have kids to send them to Boarding School.
( Primarily in the 0 - 10 year Service bracket with kids under 12. Unfortunately, even with BSA / CSA, would be highly unlikely to afford Boarding School )

2. SNCO / WO - It provided continuity of education in their kids Secondary Education.
( Primarily in the 10 - 22 year Service bracket with kids reaching 12 and above. They could afford, with BSA / CEA to send their kids to a Boarding School in order to achieve that continual education in the 12 - 18 bracket )

3. Officers - Boarding School provided a better standard of education for their kids.
( By virtue of the same BSA / CEA and possibly / probably backed up by family money, could make best use of a system that could ensure continuity of education, in one place for the duration of that kids complete education )

Points 1 & 2 are a logical progression, which is fairly easy to understand.

I don't know about nowadays, but when I was in, I did not come across too many 2Lt's, Lt's or Captains that were married or had kids ( there will always be exceptions ). Married and kids fell mainly in the domain of Maj and above.

Therefore, the comparison, if one really needs to be made is between SNCO / WO and Major and above. Unfortunately, the difference in length of Service will skew those figures.
 
With the very few exceptions who have reached VSO rank, those in my cohort who stayed have recently retired or are currently retiring after a full career. Of those, a minority have found good roles; one or two excellent roles. But most are struggling to find work that really motivates them and / or meets their financial expectations. Who employs an institutionalised 55 year old into a commercial role for the first time?

Of those of us who left at or soon after first pension point (I stayed a little longer to get promoted to Lt Col), most have done very well across a broad range of sectors. Many (I’m one) are displaying talents that were simply buried in uniform.

A key decider in my decision to leave was continuity of education for my kids. Actually, more than education. Our priority was to bring our kids up in a stable family home; no boarding, no bean steeling and no moves every two years. The perceived requirement for CEA was exactly why we left (we were both officers).

IMHO the system of which CEA is a part drives out talent and retains the journeymen.
I should qualify that by saying my cohort of RAF officers had no difficulty in get very well paying jobs.
 
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