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Intelligence Doubt.

Kelzi

Crow
Good Evening people, I am a mum who at 00:14( I'm now reposting here at 06:35) I'm writing on here concerned.
I have a daughter who is only a few weeks away from completely her basic phase 1 training in Pirbright, she started this army journey over a year ago wanting to apply for the Intelligence corps linguistics/language role. She has been to uni, learnt Japanese, a Gcse in Spanish & has self taught some Korean. She saw all the positives, passed so many tests, vetting, drill, inspections & PT etc Her revision, perseverance & fitness has excelled (even though she is a creature of comfort) I am very proud of what she has achieved(especially under these virus constrictions). And with phase 2 in chicksands around the corner, she is well on her way to doing what she loves.
SO this week she has declared that the army path to translation/languages is now not for her!!!? I've tried to get to the bottom of it, its caused a lot of raised voices. To say I'm not disappointed is an understatement, I feel she will be making a huge mistake giving up now.
I believe she worries about the job role being still heavily PT & full exercises. She has been bombarded with lots of info, which I believe she's only hearing the negatives? She still wants to do languages/translation but on civi street. This does not compute in my head. What can I do? Is there anyone out there in this type of role who can give her an insight/realities of this role? Think she needs someone to speak to.
I'm gutted she's got this far to throw in the towel. She has a lot to offer but I feel she is now on a 'downer' and in flee mode.
Any advice, reassurance or help for both her & myself would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance,
Kindest regards
Kelzi. ☹
 
It’s a tricky situation because you don’t know the details of the job until you start doing it due to the sensitive nature of much of the work. There is NO money in languages in civ div, trust me I looked plus in the Corps role you make a difference. You save lives and influence decision making at all levels. She’s done the hard part getting through basic and will enjoy the intellectual challenges ahead. Try and get her to stick with it so her efforts aren’t wasted though if she wants to leave that is her choice. In that case get her to look at the Reserves
 

CRmeansCeilingReached

ADC
Moderator
@Kelzi - what does your daughter think? Because it sounds like you're primarily disappointed that she isn't following what you thought to be a good choice, rather than listening to what she actually wants. She is the one going through Army training, and she is the one who truly knows whether it is something she wants to do. You can't always tell that kind of thing until you've given it a bash.

If the Army isn't for her, a pushy mum isn't going to help proceedings. From personal experience, can I suggest a lot more time genuinely listening and understanding, rather than trying to influence her choice towards what you think is best?
 
I get the feeling that this is nothing to do with the role, sounds like being in the Army is too much like hard work when it comes to personal fitness and staying fit for purpose.

I suppose the advice of eat less (or at least better) and move more to make things easier would fall on deaf ears so maybe it's not for her - although she'd be absolutely mad to leave in the current climate, but I'm not a fan of those that can't motivate themselves to get basic levels of fitness in the Military, especially in their prime.

But make sure it's her choice - she has to live with it.
 
Many of us have doubts. OK, I joined the RAF, not the Army, but all the way through phase one and two training, all the "dicking" about that you get, all the grief that you aren't getting much right....of course we all thought about chucking in the towel.

All I can say is that until you've got out into the "real" Army, doing the real job, you just don't know how you will fit in.

I'm still serving, 36 years later! Loved every bit of it, once I was out of training (apart from the s**t bits, but you forget the cold, wet and tired bits once you are through them (yes, even we, in the Crabs have them, just not often!).

You won't be able to make up her mind for her, but if she can stick it into the proper job, things get better and then she can make up her mind with all the facts.

If she really doesn't like the Army, but still wants to do languages and have a career....


Although, if she does go for the RAF, I hope she like Lincolnshire.....
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Thanks for reposting this as I suggested. As noted elsewhere, I had a fantastic time and a thoroughly enjoyable career as a linguist, but there are a couple of things to take into account (including what @CRmeansCeilingReached hints at):

  • An intelligence linguist is an intelligence specialist who may use la foreign anguage. Language isn't the primary focus, it's one of the skills needed for the job.
  • The work is extremely varied, from static roles in essentially shirt-sleeve environments, to quite demanding field roles, in austere conditions, with an element of physical danger.
  • Ultimately, she's an adult and must make her own decisions. I suspect your disappointment at what you see as a poor decision on her part will probably not help her make a sensible decision about her future. Has she explained in a bit more detail what her concerns are?
  • As @devexwarrior notes, there's no money in pure languages in civilian life. Both he and I were extremely highly qualified in various languages thanks to our service, but both elected to follow non-linguist career paths outside. My own languages have been useful, of course, but have been enablers and additions to the other skills and aptitudes the military gave me, rather than a primary focus. As a rule, former Int Corps types do very well in civilian life, earning (generally) comfortably above the national average, in many cases, by several multiples.
  • For what it's worth, I'd encourage her to stick with it.
 
A mix of what everyone has said but worth remembering;
The next few years are going to be hard in the civvie world.
Int Corps looks great on a CV. If she sticks with it she will leave with a range of experience and abilities that no university degree can give.
She's an adult and must make her own decisions
Most recruits feel as she does.
 
It’s a tricky situation because you don’t know the details of the job until you start doing it due to the sensitive nature of much of the work. There is NO money in languages in civ div, trust me I looked plus in the Corps role you make a difference. You save lives and influence decision making at all levels. She’s done the hard part getting through basic and will enjoy the intellectual challenges ahead. Try and get her to stick with it so her efforts aren’t wasted though if she wants to leave that is her choice. In that case get her to look at the Reserves
Dev - does Ph 2 not start with indoctrination (or 'site visit') for all any more? I realise that many things have changed since my (and @Whiskybreath 's) day). It was only after the 'site visit' that I realised exactly what was for me. And it was not the dark side.

To the OP (for whom what I have typed is probably gibberish) all the best for your daughter's future.
 
If she's been through university, I would assume that she has the brains to research her choices and make her own decisions. Has she discussed this with anyone who is better placed than most people on this site (such as people currently in the Int Corps) who could give accurate and up to date advice about the future role?
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
If she's been through university, I would assume that she has the brains to research her choices and make her own decisions. Has she discussed this with anyone who is better placed than most people on this site (such as people currently in the Int Corps) who could give accurate and up to date advice about the future role?
Nice bit of passive aggression, there, matey. Neatly and deftly done. For info, the OP has been separately advised on the counsel she might give to her daughter in terms of who to approach *and* directed here in the hope of a serving Corps member stepping up with, as you so perceptively note, accurate and up to date advice.
 

NSP

LE
Many of us have doubts. OK, I joined the RAF, not the Army, but all the way through phase one and two training, all the "dicking" about that you get, all the grief that you aren't getting much right....of course we all thought about chucking in the towel.
Would that not be the point of it, though? - to weed out and dispense with through a form of natural self-selection those without the right level of drive and commitment, and the will power to put up with a bit of stress and hardship and still get the job done, before it's cost too much public money and people's time finding out down the line, or in the midst of some critical operational moment?
 
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Dev - does Ph 2 not start with indoctrination (or 'site visit') for all any more? I realise that many things have changed since my (and @Whiskybreath 's) day). It was only after the 'site visit' that I realised exactly what was for me. And it was not the dark side.

To the OP (for whom what I have typed is probably gibberish) all the best for your daughter's future.
I don’t know. My involvement with phase 2 was limited to the language training side only.
 
Would that not be the point of it, though? - to weed out and dispense with through a form of natural self-selection those without the right level of drive and commitment, and the will power to put up with a bit of stress and hardship and still get the job done, before it's cost too much public money and people's time finding out down the line, or in the midst of some critical operational moment?

No, it's at best a feeble justification for poor admin.

If you want to select for drive and commitment, you can do it in a productive way (see: selection). "Dicking about" the troops is just that - someone wasn't thinking the things through, wasn't coordinating properly. Yes, sometimes it's unavoidable, even with good people doing their best, but I always reckoned it was best to be honest about the cockups, so that lessons could be learned. IMHO "It gets them used to real life" is just sloping-shoulder syndrome, too-often used to justify poor retention.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
I don’t know. My involvement with phase 2 was limited to the language training side only.
I taught on what would nowadays be called Phase 2 for three years, but things will have changed dramatically since then. Certainly, there used to be a mechanism to brief and inform potential 'darksiders' of their options, generally utterly trashed by the Op Int mafia on return to Ashford, of course.
 

green_slime

Old-Salt
As other posters have said, you don't really know what the jobs entail until you do them. Even then they can range from 14 Sigs (potentially lots of 'military' to almost office based working in a strategic centre.

From my (now a few years ago) perspective, join when young and enjoy one of the best Corps in the Army until you stop enjoying it or stop being good at it.
 

Arse_Bandit

Old-Salt
The way the Military is going, she could stay involved as a Reservist and change her mind when she realizes that it's interesting work?
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
The way the Military is going, she could stay involved as a Reservist and change her mind when she realizes that it's interesting work?
Unfortunately, the full range of Int Corps trades and specialisations isn't available in the reserve for direct entrants.

Some functions have a reserve backup, but require regular service first.
 
Good Evening people, I am a mum who at 00:14( I'm now reposting here at 06:35) I'm writing on here concerned.
I have a daughter who is only a few weeks away from completely her basic phase 1 training in Pirbright, she started this army journey over a year ago wanting to apply for the Intelligence corps linguistics/language role. She has been to uni, learnt Japanese, a Gcse in Spanish & has self taught some Korean. She saw all the positives, passed so many tests, vetting, drill, inspections & PT etc Her revision, perseverance & fitness has excelled (even though she is a creature of comfort) I am very proud of what she has achieved(especially under these virus constrictions). And with phase 2 in chicksands around the corner, she is well on her way to doing what she loves.
SO this week she has declared that the army path to translation/languages is now not for her!!!? I've tried to get to the bottom of it, its caused a lot of raised voices. To say I'm not disappointed is an understatement, I feel she will be making a huge mistake giving up now.
I believe she worries about the job role being still heavily PT & full exercises. She has been bombarded with lots of info, which I believe she's only hearing the negatives? She still wants to do languages/translation but on civi street. This does not compute in my head. What can I do? Is there anyone out there in this type of role who can give her an insight/realities of this role? Think she needs someone to speak to.
I'm gutted she's got this far to throw in the towel. She has a lot to offer but I feel she is now on a 'downer' and in flee mode.
Any advice, reassurance or help for both her & myself would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance,
Kindest regards
Kelzi. ☹
Is there any way that an authoritative voice from the Centre of Darkness could chat with your daughter freely? Could you get in touch with someone who could get in touch with someone (etc) to arrange that? It may be profitable, and be the cost-efficient solution.

(I'm not of that persuasion; my Corps life was a dreary and tedious cycle of proper Op Int & Sy postings, with bullets, bombs, chinagraph and spies and stuff, and an appalling failure to grasp any languages at all. However, I believe that those who go that way find it rewarding; a current, informed and empathetic voice might make the difference).
 
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I speak from a position of ignorance - however, were I advising my child, I would note this.

The forces as a whole are upskilling mahoosively on Cyber. Were you to be a person with experience at high level with languages and technically competent, you will be in demand in civilian employment. I don't mean over at Cheltenham; I mean in other cyber threat intelligence and large companies.

For the Russian speakers for example, the only thing more fun that translating what Vlad is going to do to us is probably translating what Vlad Jnr is going to do to us in a financial crime forum.

I foresee a good market in the future in cyber threat intelligence, as the world has just woken up to this. And they don't all speak English.

Future proofing is an excellent Corps skill.

;)
 
OP not seen since 15 Jan. I wonder what the outcome was ?
 

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