INT CORPS Reservist Officer direct entry

#1
Good afternoon all,

I recently applied to join the Army Reserve as an officer and would like to find out more about joining INT CORPS.

The information shared here already is both interesting and useful but I was wondering if anyone would be able to shed any light on how the selection process differs for soldiers and officers?

Thanks in advance.
 
#3
Hello and thank you for responding.

I am in North East England - 52 MI Coy in Gateshead would be my nearest detachment.

My interest in INT CORPS is three fold:
1) The role of Military Intelligence is in itself interesting and I expect very challenging which makes it attractive. If it were possible to 'work' at evenings and weekends as opposed to primarily training for deployment that would also be very appealing.

2) In the time that I volunteer I would like to make sure that I make the most valuable contribution to the Army that I can. I have transferable skills and experience from civvi street which I imagine could be beneficial when commanding Intelligence Operatives in particular.

3) Human communication is an interest of mine. Although I have applied to the Army Reserves as an officer, in the case of the INT CORPS I wonder if a role as a soldier could open up alternative attractive opportunities, such as going on to specialise in hands on Human Intelligence.

Thanks again.
 
#4
As a rule of thumb, especially in the Corps, officers command stuff, soldiers do stuff. If you're interested in intelligence work, you might find enlistment as a soldier a better bet; if you want to exercise command over difficult, challenging, clever, subversive and intolerant soldiers, then officer would be the preference.
 
#5
As a rule of thumb, especially in the Corps, officers command stuff, soldiers do stuff. If you're interested in intelligence work, you might find enlistment as a soldier a better bet; if you want to exercise command over difficult, challenging, clever, subversive and intolerant soldiers, then officer would be the preference.
Not to mention the Warrant Officer running interference to keep you away from the troops.
 
#6
Thank you both, I understand and will be interested to hear more from the unit.

If anyone has any further info on if the selection process is significantly different that would still be of interest too.
 
#7
Frankly I've been away from the AR (9 years now) that anything I say will be so out of date as to be useless.
 
#10
Hello and thank you for responding.

I am in North East England - 52 MI Coy in Gateshead would be my nearest detachment.

My interest in INT CORPS is three fold:
1) The role of Military Intelligence is in itself interesting and I expect very challenging which makes it attractive. If it were possible to 'work' at evenings and weekends as opposed to primarily training for deployment that would also be very appealing.

2) In the time that I volunteer I would like to make sure that I make the most valuable contribution to the Army that I can. I have transferable skills and experience from civvi street which I imagine could be beneficial when commanding Intelligence Operatives in particular.

3) Human communication is an interest of mine. Although I have applied to the Army Reserves as an officer, in the case of the INT CORPS I wonder if a role as a soldier could open up alternative attractive opportunities, such as going on to specialise in hands on Human Intelligence.

Thanks again.
As an officer, you will not do anything of use. All of the fun stuff is done at NCO level so you will mainly be doing paper work.

From my experience of INT corps stabs you will find that your junior NCOs often have more life experience than you do.

Going back a few years but one of the company's I had dealings with had an officer who was a trainee supermarket manager having to look after a LCpl who was the deputy head of the local regional Special Branch and a full screw who was a country manager for a large private security firm. The staff Sgt was a barrister. Basically they did it for a laugh.

One of the best put downs I heard was on a selection weekend where one lad stated he wanted to be an officer because he's had a degree. The full screws response? 'I've got a PhD, what makes you so f**king special.

They're an odd bunch. I've dealt with many if their JNCOs on tour and to a man and woman, once you overcame the poorly shaped berets, inability to march, and general lack of military bearing, to a man and woman they were outstanding and in a lot of cases would outperform my NCOs.

The officers however tended to be sidelined into unimportant staff roles.

Just saying, if it interested. Try looking at joining as an NCO as you can always go for a commission later.
 

jrwlynch

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
Hello and thank you for responding.

I am in North East England - 52 MI Coy in Gateshead would be my nearest detachment.

My interest in INT CORPS is three fold:
1) The role of Military Intelligence is in itself interesting and I expect very challenging which makes it attractive. If it were possible to 'work' at evenings and weekends as opposed to primarily training for deployment that would also be very appealing.
As others have pointed out, if you want to actually do G2/J2 work, you'd be better off going in as a private - Int Corps JRs and NCOs seem to do all the actual practical work, their officers run the admin.

If you want a mixture of officer role and actual intelligence work, have you considered the Navy Reserve? They let their junior officers actually handle and produce product and get involved in the tasking...
 
#12
I'm about a year out of date but the comments made by Afghan Andy are valid. The quality gap between soldiers and officers is invariably non-existence and often the only real difference is the level of annoyance each cohort generates. Like many on here I have experience of both but additionally I've recruited both. I have also seen both cohorts perform on their respective Op MI/Of MI foundation courses. The soldiers are often better. The people Afghan Andy describes are also known to me and he does not exaggerate beyond the fact that the barrister was a solicitor (although he owned a very large legal firm). In addition to this the soldier cohort contains many experienced people from law enforcement whose skill-set sits quite well with the regular Corps and vice versa.

There are reservist soldiers who work and have worked in law, civil service, banking, industry, nuclear science, cyber and politics (check out Bob Seely MP). The point is that the soldier cohort in the Reserve Corps is unique across the Army and I've seen my share of it. The officer cohort looks pretty similar to other parts of the Army. I'm not saying they're not talented but if you deploy as a young officer in the Corps you probably won't be given anything decent to do unless you have a real force of personality and a niche expertise which adds genuine value to the commanders mission.

The soldier entry option will put you in impressive company. Becoming a Warrant Officer is the ultimate achievement for the soldier Reservist. The majority of WOs are graduates. Many have a masters. Some of the best soldiers have been recommended for a commission. I have made two such recommendations and both declined. That should tell you something.

The choice has to be yours but if I was you I wouldn't deny yourself at least some time as a soldier. You can apply for a commission at any time if you wish and there will always be a need for young officers if you decide to apply later.

Good luck with your decision.
 
#13
For once in my life I agree with WB. The Soldiers in the Corps, and the AR in particular, are quite a 'special' group of people. I was always amazed at the skills that they brought to the Corps compared with Old Duffers like WB and I.

Junior Officers were all very bright, keen and enthusiastic (which is great), but in the real world they don't get to do much in the way of exciting jobs. That is left to the soldiers. The LE officers get the decent officer jobs as they have years of experience and a proven track record.

In my humble opinion, you are probably better off joining as a soldier and then deciding on commissioning at a later stage, if it's really what you want. Most of the best officers I have come across in the Corps have all started out as 'proper' soldiers.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
 
#15
For once in my life I agree with WB. The Soldiers in the Corps, and the AR in particular, are quite a 'special' group of people. I was always amazed at the skills that they brought to the Corps compared with Old Duffers like WB and I.

Junior Officers were all very bright, keen and enthusiastic (which is great), but in the real world they don't get to do much in the way of exciting jobs. That is left to the soldiers. The LE officers get the decent officer jobs as they have years of experience and a proven track record.

In my humble opinion, you are probably better off joining as a soldier and then deciding on commissioning at a later stage, if it's really what you want. Most of the best officers I have come across in the Corps have all started out as 'proper' soldiers.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
With all due respect you and WB do not qualify as Old Duffers, that tag is reserved for the gentleman from Oldham, a certain other gent from deepest Essex and myself.
 

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