Insurance for learners

Discussion in 'Cars, Bikes 'n AFVs' started by Fang_Farrier, Nov 24, 2010.

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  1. Fang_Farrier

    Fang_Farrier LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    The car is only worth £1680 so why will it cost £1500 extra to insure it for Miss Fang to learn to drive in it? (£20 for me to drive it bumped up to £140 for me and her)

    That's with Post Office Insurance, it's a 52 plate, 1.2 Ford so it's no big whizz machine.

    Any suggestions?

    And is it better for her to have her own insurance from start or just be a named driver on mine?
     
  2. The_Duke

    The_Duke LE Moderator

    Why so expensive? Because novice drivers have a habit of driving into things. It is not the value of her car that matters, it is the repair cost to the Aston/Ferrari/Porsche (insert high value car of choice) that she hits.

    Own insurance vs named driver - it entirely depends on the usage. If it is genuinely your car and she uses it on the odd occasion then fine, add her to your policy. If it is her car and you are insuring it with her as a named driver to keep the cost down then stand by if she has a shunt. You are not the first to follow that route and it will be investigated by the insurer. In effect, you are making a fraudulent statement of usage. Expect to have your cover rescinded or any claim massively reduced to reflect the difference between what you told the insurer and the truth.

    Best option is to take the pain on the cheapest car to insure you can find, and hope she keeps it in one piece for long enough to build up some NCB.
     
  3. Fang_Farrier

    Fang_Farrier LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    I know about the cost and it's not just about own car, just having a rant!

    It's my car (until she passes her test apparently!), she'll only be doing wee runs here and there as she learns to drive.
     
  4. Best is to get her her own really shitty little car and insure it in her name but with yourself as a named second driver. That way you will be legal and above board and reduce the costs for her insurance now and potentially in the future.

    Also look into companies that offer multi-car policies.
     
  5. Just been through all of this with our son, we ended up with the NFU, they do a couple of different deals that may be for you and were by far the most competitive as far as costs go.

    Best of luck, though you seem to be getting a good deal, we were quoted over £5000 for our son to be the principal driver after passing his test for a Citroen Saxo 1.1.