Instant Tracked Vehicle - one for Mobility Tp to play with

#1
Had this thrust under my nose the other day and I thought it looked useful and a good solution if you need to use a wheeled vehicle in a different setting. It is already being played with by various law enforcement agencies allowing them to use their SUV's and pick ups in snowy conditions.

Track N Go | Track N Go

 

goodoldboy

MIA
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#2
Had this thrust under my nose the other day and I thought it looked useful and a good solution if you need to use a wheeled vehicle in a different setting. It is already being played with by various law enforcement agencies allowing them to use their SUV's and pick ups in snowy conditions.

Track N Go | Track N Go

The promotional video shows it working well and could, indeed, have potential with the emergency services. Do you know the selling price?
 
#3
#5
Beat me. Yup, $25K............probably get discount for buying a few.
Which to be honest, isn't that bad at all for a tracked vehicle. A low-end tracked Bobcat is about $50K, and it's a construction tool only. For a bit over $50K all in, one could get a 4x4 truck and the tracked system.
 
#6
Which to be honest, isn't that bad at all for a tracked vehicle. A low-end tracked Bobcat is about $50K, and it's a construction tool only. For a bit over $50K all in, one could get a 4x4 truck and the tracked system.
It is not just the cost of the truck though, consider the kit fitted to a specialist vehicle and that probably doubles or trebles the base vehicle cost. This nice little system allows you to reverse into it, carry on with familiar kit without having to spend another humungous amount of money for a specialist tracked vehicle which will at most only get used for a few weeks a year.
 
#7
I bet it puts some undue pressure on the clutch

I reckon you'll need some chunky torque to use it too
 
#8
Which to be honest, isn't that bad at all for a tracked vehicle. A low-end tracked Bobcat is about $50K, and it's a construction tool only. For a bit over $50K all in, one could get a 4x4 truck and the tracked system.
I hadn't thought about it before, but this brought it to the fore. Help me out here please. There's a series running here, originally from National Geographic, "Life below Zero" - basically people who choose to live way off the grid in Alaska. There's a woman on that with a Bobcat. In summer it's three pairs of wheels, in winter, she just drives on to a pair of tracks, heaves them over, links in and off she goes. In summer I suppose one or more pairs of wheels steers as normal. In winter, it must be a track braking system with the steering pair locked off. Have you heard of or encountered one of these?
 
#9
Presumably you'd need an 'H' licence to use them on the roads? I'd also quite liked to have seen the pick-up attempting to tackle the same terrain sans tracks- I reckon it would have been okay on some of it- maybe with a few psi let out.
 
#10
I hadn't thought about it before, but this brought it to the fore. Help me out here please. There's a series running here, originally from National Geographic, "Life below Zero" - basically people who choose to live way off the grid in Alaska. There's a woman on that with a Bobcat. In summer it's three pairs of wheels, in winter, she just drives on to a pair of tracks, heaves them over, links in and off she goes. In summer I suppose one or more pairs of wheels steers as normal. In winter, it must be a track braking system with the steering pair locked off. Have you heard of or encountered one of these?
It’s an Argo she drives, and it steers the same with or without tracks. Those tracks have been available for a few decades at least and work pretty good. Our snowmobile club has one.
 
#11
It’s an Argo she drives, and it steers the same with or without tracks. Those tracks have been available for a few decades at least and work pretty good. Our snowmobile club has one.
How so, mechanically?
 
#12
I bet it puts some undue pressure on the clutch

I reckon you'll need some chunky torque to use it too
BFO American pickups, huge V8's, designed to tow a space shuttle - more or less, well Toyota actually did - so I reckon it would be fine.
 
#13
What's a clutch? :)
 
#15
Yes, mechanical rather than hydro. Mechanical has more power to weight than hydro systems do.
My fault for asking a question cryptically. If the steering system is same with wheels or tracks, does it mean:

1. That the beast is 6 X 6, and

2. That on 'left hand down' with wheels employed. LH wheels are geared to slow down, so that theoretically, full lock means neutral turn as would happen with a full-time tracked vehicle?
 
#17
Presumably the four tracks also distribute the kg/cm^2 much better.

Should give you several square feet per track rather than about four square inches per wheel.

Handy for driving on frozen lakes and very deep snow.

Jumbled up metric and imperial a bit there. Hey ho.
 
#18
Presumably the four tracks also distribute the kg/cm^2 much better.

Should give you several square feet per track rather than about four square inches per wheel.

Handy for driving on frozen lakes and very deep snow.

Jumbled up metric and imperial a bit there. Hey ho.
Think of them as rotary snow shooz for vehicles.;)

I would have a question for the makers: Having seen snowmobiles used on sand, and water, would these function on sand (ie. desert). Ok, so a second question, are these tracks indeed suitable for sand and road surface?

Time for some simple maths using my Touareg as an example.

As the Touareg sits:

My Touareg has tyres: 255 60 17. I did some clever measuring (with a ruler) and found they each have a contact area of around 6 inches x 8 inches.

4 (tyres) x 6 x 8 = 192 square inches total ground contact

My Touareg weighs just over 5000 lbs

5000 lbs / 192 sq ins = 26 lbs per sq inch

If the tracks are attached:

Track weight (gross for 4) = 1500 lbs

Therefore all up weight: 5000 lbs + 1500 lbs = 6500 lbs

The tracks have (according to the spec) a minimum contact area per track of 1680 sq in.

4 x 1680 = 6720 sq in

6500 (vehicle + track weight) / 6720 sq in = 0.96 lbs sq in.

So unless I monged the maths the per sq inch weight is reduced from 26 lbs per sq inch to 0.96 lbs per sq inch.

Impressive.
 
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#20
And how many miles guaranteed before the tyre/track interface has to be replaced ?
I had a read of their literature and they say it is guaranteed for one season. In my experience a white season in the northern US starts in late November and goes through to March/April.

I think they need to define that a bit more.h
 

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