Injured Troops placed in Mixed Civilian Wards

#2
Jesus, so these taxpaying lads are in unsecure enviroments after the NHS has had its budget doubled.
 
#5
Joe public is being distracted John...Look! A Celebrity!!! Over There!
 
#6
I'd be more concerned we have so many wounded we have to do this
 
#7
PartTimePongo said:
I'd be more concerned we have so many wounded we have to do this
But surely as the MOD 'do not collate information on wounded British servicemen' there are actually none - prehaps PTP you should 'get with the program'
 
#8
Dear God, how can they do this? What a Morale Killer that must be. Get hit with Schrapnel in A-Stan and put into an Open ward next to Heroin Addicts, Or Mentally Unstable persons. Totally unsecure from a Force Protection standpoint as well, any Lunatic with a grudge can get at them.

Dont You have anyone who will stand up for these Lads & say "ENOUGH"? They deserve the best treatment Your Country can give, not to be shunted off & Hidden.
 
#9
Mixed wards are an abomination. Imagine your mothers, wives, sisters, girlfriends and daughters being made to exist together with male junkies and alcoholics.
To disperse wounded Service personnel willy-nilly into civilian hospitals around the country is a national disgrace.
Trouble is, over the last nine years this country has become a disgrace and I have a pretty good idea how this has come about. T BLIAR & Co.
The thought of T Bliar being given the Knighthood of the Garter and 'Lady' Bliar parading about accepting freebies makes me want to vomit. Would North Vietnam or Southern Sudan be good places to escape too? Anyone know? Maybe Zimbabwe? By comparasion with Bliar, Mugabe doesn't sound too bad. Then there is the thought of Kim-Il Broon! Stand by for more cuts in the Armed Forces.
What has Great Britain done to deserve this unreconstructed bunch of grinning spivs running the place?
 
#10
This is disgraceful, our mates and colleagues being treated in this way.

I would like to say i am surprised, but i would be lieing if i said so. :(:(

Sparky
 
#11
Erm... When the military hospitals were open, most servicemen and women were treated in mixed wards alongside members of the public... at least in the ones I worked in (five of them). I don't think any of the 'military' hospitals excluded civilians and- as far as I know- not many had single sex wards. They all certainly took NHS patients on the basis of need when on take, etc..
 
#12
lsquared said:
Mixed wards are an abomination. Imagine your mothers, wives, sisters, girlfriends and daughters being made to exist together with male junkies and alcoholics.
To disperse wounded Service personnel willy-nilly into civilian hospitals around the country is a national disgrace.
Trouble is, over the last nine years this country has become a disgrace and I have a pretty good idea how this has come about. T BLIAR & Co.
The thought of T Bliar being given the Knighthood of the Garter and 'Lady' Bliar parading about accepting freebies makes me want to vomit. Would North Vietnam or Southern Sudan be good places to escape too? Anyone know? Maybe Zimbabwe? By comparasion with Bliar, Mugabe doesn't sound too bad. Then there is the thought of Kim-Il Broon! Stand by for more cuts in the Armed Forces.
What has Great Britain done to deserve this unreconstructed bunch of grinning spivs running the place?
The civvy junkies and alcoholics were generally no problem and grateful to be being looked after. It was the pissed up squaddie/matelot who'd lost a fight outside 'Ye Olde Kebab and Calculator', and wanted to start another with the ward staff to get his own back, who caused all the nausea. :D
 
#13
More of an issue is the pyschological effect.

It is widely accepted that depressurisation amongst colleagues/your ilk helps the adjustment back into society helping reduce the pyschological trauma. For those not injured we have an improved process but for those injured they will not go through the process and find themselves coming around next to god knows who and with no way of being able to relate/unburden.

The sooner Des gets off his fat arrse and starts sorting it out rather than the half arrsed statement that was quoted from the MoD in the article the better.
 
#14
There was a television programme shown some moths ago regarding soldiers being flown home and treated in civillian hospitals. Selly oak was featured in that. That the problem is still ongoing does not surprise me in the least.
What angers me above all is that our service men and women are being treat in such a shoddy appalling way, considering how they have come to end up on the wards to begin with. They are in pain and quite often in shock, they need to be amongst medical staff and other patients who can emphasise with this, not some head banging loon or some little old lady who natters the very ears off him.
If a soldier is brought in because of a saturday night drunken punch up, then fine. But our armed forces deserve better, much better.
Its not just that they are placed on an open, mixed public ward with a doctor who is like God, you are told he exists but you never see him, but that they are placed in these wards where they are amogst patients and visitors who can become very hostile once they find out what his job is and where he's from.
Its a bloody disgrace! :twisted:
 
#15
Most MDHUs have never had wards only for military patients with military staff. They have had a couple of wards managed by the military, but these have treated civilians too, and have also had civilian staff. After all, the whole point of closing the military hospitals was to expose military med staff to a full range of patients - they couldn't do this if they only looked after military patients.

It's worth remembering that whilst RCDM is based at Selly Oak, patients are dispersed over several hospital sites.

As mentioned by Neuroleptic, civilians were also treated in military hospitals; that is nothing new - they had mixed wards but bays were single-sex, as I recall.

I wonder whether there have been any 'diversity- related' difficulties in Birmingham. I have personally seen a couple of incidents at another MDHU of military staff being berated (and spat at, on one occasion), just because they were military.

My own experience of working in an MDHU was that many of the NHS staff made no allowance for the specific needs of military patients.
 
#16
I find the conditions in which your wounded comrades find themselves in a disgrace. I also feel that every member of the Armed Forces should contact their Member of Parliament and insist that the conditions of the individual injured members be improved forthwith.

I did my bit and served in a Dog Unit...if the dog had been injured it would have received better treatment and care than your mates are getting in the UK.

Remember T.Bliar had a severe case of 'Wind' and the might of the NHS surrounded him. I do not denigrate the NHS and Military Med staff just the ' Self Serving Bastards in # 10 and 11'
 
#17
I think a number of these posts have their facts mixed up. Yes sometimes we feel that we are not getting the care we deserve but it is not always the case.

I will try to cover a few points you all mentioned:

1. There has rarely been any military only wards in most hospitals including the old military ones.

2. The treatment you recieve in the UK is given by people who specialize in that area and have done for a long time. Selly Oak has a burns/plastics theatre and ward (one of the best in the UK) that most people are referred to by their doctors around the UK if it is deemed a requirement.

3. Flights are holted and helicopters are on standby at Birmingham International when a Aeromed is inbound. When they are on the helicopter they are flown directly to Selly Oak where the roads are shut down so that they can land.

4. The doctors and surgeons who work there are generally kn*bheads who think they are the best...but they are the best!

5. There is free accomodation (self contained flats) for families to stay at on the selly oak location when visiting from around the country.

6. There are welfare workers who basically will fetch you anything you want. They sort out people you can speak to insurance people to quicken up claims for injuries, padre if you so wish etc etc.

7. Those deemed a security risk (SF lads) know how to keep their gobs shut whilst on the ward but also their are protcols for visits etc. It is unlikely that a welfare officier from their unit will tip up wearing uniform as they know the score.

8. We do not send are troops all over the UK for no reason. It is done so they can recieve specialist care.

9. Birmingham will be the centre for defence medicine by 2010 which it already has a large number of military staff working at the hospitals while the students train at a university in the city centre. If you are permanent staff you get a shared flat all expenses paid with £500 chucked on top to live on.

10. What would you rather do? be treated in a hospital without specialist care just to be with your buddies or in a hospital that can give you all the right treatment there and then? That is one of the reasons they closed so many military hospitals...To expensive to run (Cobblers) but it never always had the areas of expertise that some trusts over the UK deal with on a day to day basis.

edited to add...

I have served in teeth arms and was a soldier before transferring to the medical world. I have numerous tours under my belt.

Im not justifying how they treat us at times but I have seen all of these things for myself and I have never spoken to a soldier who has complained that they are not recieveing what they deserve. Yes there are a few in the media but the press wouldn't report on how well they were getting treated because that wouldn't be exciting enough for the SUN or channel 5 news.
 
#18
Thanks for the points, Devils. But isn't the difference that civilians were allowed into military wards as needs dictated but they were still military wards - whereas this is service personnel being dropped into civilian wards?

Aside from the sheer shabbiness of this, what about the security aspect? Selly Oak has as part of its catchment some substantial number of Muslim-heavy districts. There have been hair-brained and evil plots by radical Muslims to attack service personnel on the their return from Iraq and Afghanistan. This is worrying - all it takes is Grandpa Mohammed to be on the ward, a sweet old fellow for sure, but then his d*ckhead grandson turns up and twigs onto something about the bloke in the next bed. Next day maybe said grandson turns up with some of his mates.
 
#19
The principle of patients being treated is on a first come first serve principle, which is only fair, ethical and moralely correct. I have never seen a soldier turned away with a leg missing. There is always a bed somewhere for them as with all other patients. We are not hard done by or given unfair treatment.

The civis I work for tend to look at the soldier with pride and they always give the treatment they deserve.

Security is not that bad. Yes we have to wear military uniform if we work there but the average soldier doesn't wear his DPM PJs whilst on a ward. Also the military staff there treat all patients on the ward so you can't really identifiy the squaddie who has been injuried in Iraq unless he starts blabbing his mouth off. You might be thinking "but hes easy to recognise because his leg is missing"...well no, most people on that ward have lost a limb or been badly burnt in an indsutrial accident.

I can't go to much into what security measures that are in place but they seem to have worked so far. If this is comprimised Im sure it would have been addressed already.
 
#20
Devils_Kin said:
3. Flights are holted and helicopters are on standby at Birmingham International when a Aeromed is inbound. When they are on the helicopter they are flown directly to Selly Oak where the roads are shut down so that they can land.
Most aeromed patients arrive at RCDM by road - from Brize Norton.

5. There is free accomodation (self contained flats) for families to stay at on the selly oak location when visiting from around the country.
The accommodation, and there is nowhere near sufficient to manage the numbers involved, is not self contained. It consists of small bedrooms which share ablution facilities with a dormitory for soldiers. There are no proper kitchen facilitis. It is situated in a Victorian block and relatives of the wounded have to go to the ablutions past people working in offices in the building. Though it has recently been redecorated (just after Dispatches), it can not be seen as anything other than very basic.

6. There are welfare workers who basically will fetch you anything you want. They sort out people you can speak to insurance people to quicken up claims for injuries, padre if you so wish etc etc.
There are 3 Welfare Officers (welfare workers are Army Welfare Service SNCOs, and there aren't any of them at RCDM). They are based at Selly Oak and cover 5 hospital sites + the Priory. They do a 1:3 on call. There aren't enough of them and they have a high staff turnover.

7. Those deemed a security risk (SF lads) know how to keep their gobs shut whilst on the ward but also their are protcols for visits etc. It is unlikely that a welfare officier from their unit will tip up wearing uniform as they know the score.
No doubt true. What about local civilians or staff who have sympathies with our enemies?

8. We do not send are troops all over the UK for no reason. It is done so they can recieve specialist care.
So, you can categorically confirm that no patient has ever been sent to a hospital other than RCDM because there were no beds? Is there no knock-on effect on the local population?

9. Birmingham will be the centre for defence medicine by 2010 which it already has a large number of military staff working at the hospitals while the students train at a university in the city centre. If you are permanent staff you get a shared flat all expenses paid with £500 chucked on top to live on.
Quite true. It's just things like Messes and the military ethos they miss out on.
 

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