INFO ABOUT MEDICAL IF YOU PLEASE?

#1
I am thinking about a transfer to AAC as a Pilot, the only thing from stopping me getting the ball rolling is the worry of a specific medical, if there is one, i only ask because i am used to working with big explosions, and my hearing is not what it used to be, any ifo will be greatly appreciated.

Cheers
 
#2
will bow to superior judgement on this, but wouldn't think it would be a problem if you can pass the hearing part of your PULHEEMS? Hearing test was bog standard 5 years ago (though in a very noisy background environment). Eyesight, however, was tested far more than anything I'd previously experienced.

SORRY, SHOULD I HAVE SHOUTED ALL THAT?!??! :)
 
#3
LOL, i have requested a full PULHEEMS with the doc, hopefuly all will be ok, its amazing how hard it is to get information on such matters, especially when making a big career change, - but thanks for your time.

shouting not necessary, i just need to move my ear horn to your general direction, a bit like direction finding LOL
 
#8
PMSL@this thread!

I've "heard" that even sub-perfect hearing is accepted - to what degree I'm not sure. Best advice has already been given - go and have a PULHHEEMS done and see what they say. At least if you're not accepted on medical grounds, it's something out of your control - rather that than being told "Fcuk off - you're a dcik" isn't it?!

:twisted:
 
#9
there is a specific medical for joining the AAC as a pilot, mostly they worry about body measurements, length of leg from hip to knee, and knee to ankle and hip to shoulder if i remember rightly. this is due to helicopters not being as adjustable for different sizes as the average car, and being able to use the controls properly. your medical centre should be able to give you the full info.
 
#10
oh yeah, they are keen on good eyesight, although it is possible to get in with goggles, they can't be too strong
 
#11
theoriginalphantom said:
there is a specific medical for joining the AAC as a pilot, mostly they worry about body measurements, length of leg from hip to knee, and knee to ankle and hip to shoulder if i remember rightly. this is due to helicopters not being as adjustable for different sizes as the average car, and being able to use the controls properly. your medical centre should be able to give you the full info.
I seem to remember that most of the measurements are to make sure you can fit into an ejection seat! I heard a story that someone tried to join (who was v tall, I have to say) and was told to bugger off due to his elongated stance . . .

Turns out he investigated and found that his rejection was on the grounds of leaving his legs (from the knees down) behind in any ejection. He pointed out that if he ejected from a helicopter, leaving his knees etc behind would not be at the "head" of his list of problems.

Good news is, he was accepted!!
 
#12
when have helicopters had ejection seats????
 
#14
Doesn't the eurocopter also have a bang out option? The whole cabin, I believe?

Or maybe I've been watching too much James Bond?!?!

No, really though . . . :wink:
 
#15
cometherevolutionbrother said:
I am thinking about a transfer to AAC as a Pilot, the only thing from stopping me getting the ball rolling is the worry of a specific medical,
Hearing is important. "Selective hearing" to filter out all the piss taking pilots get, and of course good eye sight is vital to detect totty who might be impressed by your pilot wings. I also understand that "they" prefer people with blue eyes - avoids a clash with the beret! A small chopper (cus the pun) also helps........................
 
#16
SpeckledJim said:
cometherevolutionbrother said:
I am thinking about a transfer to AAC as a Pilot, the only thing from stopping me getting the ball rolling is the worry of a specific medical,
Hearing is important. "Selective hearing" to filter out all the urine taking pilots get, and of course good eye sight is vital to detect totty who might be impressed by your pilot wings. I also understand that "they" prefer people with blue eyes - avoids a clash with the beret! A small chopper (cus the pun) also helps........................
Don't forget the inflated ego :wink:
 
#17
Inflated ego isn't medically tested, however it can be signed out on your 1157 if yours is too small.
 
#18
maybe the ejection seat was a mistake, they don't want you 'ejecting' in/on the seat?
 
#20
I've come close to evacuating myself on a few flights, especially the crypto run from Bessbrook.

Brown adrenaline anyone?
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads