Influence on singing styles

#1
I've noticed over the years that some singers have had more influence on singing styles than others. Bing Crosby's laid-back crooning style was behind such people as Dean Martin and Perry Como, while Ray Charles, once he became popular, influenced whole generations of singers such as Joe Cocker and Rod Stewart, who thought that a gravelly voice conveyed more emotion.

In the same vein, Adriano Celentano's vocal influence on Italy's singers is very evident even today, as is Charles Aznavour's distinct, quavering timbre on French singers.

Anybody else made similar observations?

MsG
 
#3
GDav said:
I've been too busy watching some paint dry on my fence to notice.
Lovely to communicate with someone as obviously cultured as yourself, GDav! :D :D :D

How're the air guitar lessons going, by the way?

MsG
 
#4
Actually I'm a music industry professional (NODUFF). I'm just having a day off :D
 
#5
You're not wrong Bugsy, although some artists dont always receive the recognition they deserve. A prime example is the influence of Windsor Davies and Don Estelle's "Whispering grass" on contemporary opera singers, and the entire gangster rap genre from Marshall Mathers to 50Cent, owes an enormous but rarely credited debt to, Chaka Demus & Pliers.
Whoever said life was fair?
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#6
As a MOD I like to watch all the threads in my Forum to ensure site rules are being followed. Looking at this thread.... Its going to be a long bloody day...

Kindly yours,

Mr 'Tone Deaf' Happy
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#7
Surely this can be looked at in a slightly different way. No, seriously...

Our pop star (are they still called that?) let's call him Randy Lawless comes up with a distinctive style. It's a mix of Jazz and Country with a bit of Rebel Rock thrown into the mix. He releases a record (album) and it goes straight to number one. So does his next, and then the one after that.

New kid on the block Danny Snake (who can't get past number 47 in the charts) sees this meteoric rise and thinks to himself - "Hmm, that style sells. I could copy that style and make myself a load of dosh". So he does. And so do the eleventy-twelve others that jump on the bandwagon.

And so it comes to pass that a whole generation sings in the Randy Lawless style, until someone, somewhere realises that they are all copycats, and starts a new trend, and the whole circle starts again.
 
#10
That's if you like baritones. I prefer tenors, rough tenors especially. Josef Locke every time.
 
#11
GDav said:
That's if you like baritones. I prefer tenors, rough tenors especially. Josef Locke every time.
Now there is a voice that is not heard enough......

Apart from the fact that he is dead

Anyway I am biased, as I am a baritone (= tenor who smoked too much!!!)
 
#12
sandmanfez said:
You're not wrong Bugsy, although some artists dont always receive the recognition they deserve. A prime example is the influence of Windsor Davies and Don Estelle's "Whispering grass" on contemporary opera singers, and the entire gangster rap genre from Marshall Mathers to 50Cent, owes an enormous but rarely credited debt to, Chaka Demus & Pliers.
Whoever said life was fair?
That's perzaklee what I mean, sandmanfez! I agree with you that many major and very important influences are, sadly, forgotten today (more's the pity) and will never garner the fame they truly deserve.

It's certainly far beyond me, but what I'd love to do is to document a progression of the more prominent influential singers as they occur. Some of them are in groups, Levi Stubbs in the Four Tops, Diana Ross in the Supremes. But there are always these quite awesome and very individual voices, Barbara Streisand, Dionne Warwick, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Solomon King, Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horn, Eartha Kitt, Billie Holliday, et al. All these people have had a lasting influence on the sounds we hear today in the spirit of a progession of talent.

It's not that I'm saying that singer A or B sound like a knock-off of singer X, but they all made a very great contribution to what we're listening today.

MsG

E2A Had to edit, coz sometimes I'm a spelling mong!
 
#13
Bugsy7 said:
sandmanfez said:
You're not wrong Bugsy, although some artists dont always receive the recognition they deserve. A prime example is the influence of Windsor Davies and Don Estelle's "Whispering grass" on contemporary opera singers, and the entire gangster rap genre from Marshall Mathers to 50Cent, owes an enormous but rarely credited debt to, Chaka Demus & Pliers.
Whoever said life was fair?
That's perzaklee what I mean, sandmanfez! I agree with you that many major and very important influences are, sadly, forgotten today (more's the pity) and will never garner the fame they truly deserve.

It's certainly far beyond me, but what I'd love to do is to document a progression of the more prominent influential singers as they occur. Some of them are in groups, Levi Stubbs in the Four Tops, Diana Ross in the Supremes. But there are always these quite awesome and very individual voices, Barbara Streisand, Dionne Warwick, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra, Solomon King, Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horn, Eartha Kitt, Billie Holliday, et al. All these people have had a lasting influence on the sounds we hear today in the spirit of a progession of talent.

It's not that I'm saying that singer A or B sound like a knock-off of singer X, but they all made a very great contribution to what we're listening today.

MsG

E2A Had to edit, coz sometimes I'm a spelling mong!
Now you're talking. These were pioneers who had nothing to copy. Each one unique in their own way. I'm not saying there isn't any originality in today's recording industry, there most certainly is but it's very often a studio sound. These people were recording with a basic rhythm section and the vox to the fore.

Yes there is still some good, unexplored talent out there but the halcyon days are over.
 
#14
GDav said:
Now you're talking. These were pioneers who had nothing to copy. Each one unique in their own way. I'm not saying there isn't any originality in today's recording industry, there most certainly is but it's very often a studio sound. These people were recording with a basic rhythm section and the vox to the fore.

Yes there is still some good, unexplored talent out there but the halcyon days are over.
GDav! If ever I get this project off the ground, I most certainly will quote your "These were pioneers who had nothing to copy" as one of the truest and starkest statements I've ever heard.

MsG
 
#15
Yes there is still some good, unexplored talent out there but the halcyon days are over.
I seriously hope not , but I can see where that comes from. As far as I am concerned modern music is over produced,
with the lead companies looking for pretty groups rather than real talent. How many of the modern groups can actually
play an instrumentl, let alone read music or even write their own material? All part of celeb culture. Would any talent scout nowadays
promote a Meatloaf or Jean Michel Jarre on their looks ( or even Jim Steinman for that matter)?

The sooner we get back to having live music in clubs rather than "DJs/MCs" the better.
 
#16
Bugsy7 said:
GDav said:
Now you're talking. These were pioneers who had nothing to copy. Each one unique in their own way. I'm not saying there isn't any originality in today's recording industry, there most certainly is but it's very often a studio sound. These people were recording with a basic rhythm section and the vox to the fore.

Yes there is still some good, unexplored talent out there but the halcyon days are over.
GDav! If ever I get this project off the ground, I most certainly will quote your "These were pioneers who had nothing to copy" as one of the truest and starkest statements I've ever heard.

MsG
Oooohh-errrr Missus 8)
 
#17
Gremlin said:
Yes there is still some good, unexplored talent out there but the halcyon days are over.
I seriously hope not , but I can see where that comes from. As far as I am concerned modern music is over produced,
with the lead companies looking for pretty groups rather than real talent. How many of the modern groups can actually
play an instrumentl, let alone read music or even write their own material? All part of celeb culture. Would any talent scout nowadays
promote a Meatloaf or Jean Michel Jarre on their looks ( or even Jim Steinman for that matter)?

The sooner we get back to having live music in clubs rather than "DJs/MCs" the better.
Yes a lot of modern music relies on studio technique but there are thousands of new bands who write their own stuff and play their own instruments. They have styles to copy however whereas the people Bugsy was talking about had no influences other than what they had heard in church etc.

There are new musical acts being promoted all the time but they are aimed at a certain market - the mass market and our genres are no longer in that bracket.

If you want live music in clubs go to Jumpin Jaks, Chicago Rock Cafe or Jam House. Just three names of many brands who provide live mucis in the categories we're interested in. They don't cater for the teen market.
 
#18
i went to see Tony Bennet with my old fella at the Albert Hall last year, and i have to admit i was blown away by the old f ucker...

I remember hearing his dulcet tones coming through the floor of my bedroom whn i was a kid, and another party was in full swing downstairs, but was a little nervous of going to see him in case age had reduced him to a croak...

i needn't have worried.

half way through his set, he placed down the microphone and sang his version of "fly me to the moon" sans mic to the entire audotorium, and it was crystal clear and powerful enough to hear every note.... legend.

Indeed Frank Sinatra once described him as "the best damn singer i ever heard"

Praise indeed.
 
#19
I was thinking about this thread on me way back from the office and I think we're being unkind to real talent.

For a start, studio sound has been around for a while. Phil Spector used it to create his 'wall of sound' and Buddy Holly double tracked guitar and vox.

I was also listening to a CD of one of my own bands. They're Zimbabwean and I marvelled aty the way they used production techniques to mix African percussion sounds on europop tracks and even in gaelrock. The I started thinking of original bands like the Cardigans and the Cranberries and people like U2, Brian Kennedy, Liam Reilly, Eric Bogle, Harvey Andrews, Neill Diamond and the list goes on.

The talent is there and I think we'll continue to see it come out but there's no doubt that in most cases they owe their sound to those who came first.

But what if there had been no styles to copy? These people would still have talent and they would still create music for us.

I mean of Mozart had been alive today (the first musical superstar) would he have used studio techniques? Time Rice and Andrew Lloyd Weber do?

I think there's still enough to enjoy in the world of music. I of all people should be thankfull for it too because it's my living.

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