Infantry Roles

Most people get disillusioned and leave the army after 3 years in a rifle company, regardless of any premature enthusiasms for specialist roles. If the OP is strongly attracted to a particular skillset, he should possibly consider joining the relevant corps.
Thanks for all the replies above!

As for joining relevant Corps to trade, easier said than done.

Currently going through the reserves joining process, there is no Signals Reg or Engineer Reg near me here in South Wales.

Local unit is an infantry reserve unit, so thanks all for shedding some light in the subject.
 
Last edited:
Thanks for all the replies above!

As for joining relevant Corps to trade, easier said than done.

Currently going through the reserves joining process, there is Signals Reg near me hear in South Wales.

Local unit is an infantry reserve unit, so thanks all for shedding some light in the subject.
Good luck wherever you end up!
 
It's possibly a separate issue, but I think that the integration of women into the infantry will inevitably further damage morale. It won't happen immediately, but standards will slip, unit cohesion will be reduced, and the blokes will lose pride in cap badge and role. I'd be delighted to be proved wrong, but I'm convinced that will be the reality within a decade or so.

It’s happened, so it has to be got on with. I’d view it as a test of leadership and allocating the right tasks to the right soldier.

I watched an RA SMIG digging out a female gunner because she couldn’t load a missile onto the beam. It wasn’t possible because she wasn’t tall enough, she would have been fine on any other beam or if the other beams were free of missiles. You need to be 6ft plus to manage it, but the SMIG was determined it was her missile and she was to load it. I’d say the failure was the SMIG’s, not the lasses.
 
It’s happened, so it has to be got on with. I’d view it as a test of leadership and allocating the right tasks to the right soldier.

I watched an RA SMIG digging out a female gunner because she couldn’t load a missile onto the beam. It wasn’t possible because she wasn’t tall enough, she would have been fine on any other beam or if the other beams were free of missiles. You need to be 6ft plus to manage it, but the SMIG was determined it was her missile and she was to load it. I’d say the failure was the SMIG’s, not the lasses.

Just my take on the issue:

The infantry platoon or company is basically an extension of the male hunting bands and war bands that have (probably) existed since there were proto-humans on the planet. Men evolved to function in them, women didn't. The issue of physical standards aside, throwing women into the mix completely disrupts the (usually highly functional) pecking orders, structures and group dynamics. Apologies if that sounds like evolutionary psychobabble...

I know from friends in other armies that unit cohesion, mutual trust and respect, efficiency and effectiveness rapidly diminished when women soldiers were integrated into their infantry units. Reduced physical standards were simply a part of the wider issue. The net result was that male morale and motivation slumped and overall standards fell. Previously dependable units became questionable. The official response was essentially dogmatic and deceitful, further undermining morale.

If women want to be infantry soldiers - and make the physical standard - put them in female sub units with female officers and NCOs. The sub units can be led and administrated (within the military framework) in a 'female friendly' manner.

As you said, it's happened and has to be got on with. Unfortunately, I think it's a test of leadership that the army will comprehensively fail. The core quality of British infantry will decline significantly within a generation - or less. Perhaps technological advances will compensate for this to some extent, but I reckon it will still come down to 'boots and bayonets' in the end.
 

Latest Threads

Top