Infantry Roles

Hi all, just wanting some light shed on two infantry Roles please.

British army website advertises a "Combat Communications" role within an infantry Reg, anyone know what is involved with training i.e go off and train with RSigs? And what does that job do "out in the field"?

Next question

Assault pioneer within an infantry Reg -what do they do? I see they do demolitions, build fortifications +traps and dig holes
Is it a frontline role or is it REMF within infantry?

Tah
 

offog

LE
Cheese and ham sometimes with pickles.

Carries a radio. works within the Coy/Bn CP.

Definitely not a REMF and blows things up in a small way.
 
Cheese and ham sometimes with pickles.

Carries a radio. works within the Coy/Bn CP.

Definitely not a REMF and blows things up in a small way.

Carries a radio. works within the Coy/Bn CP.

Recruited from anybody who doesn't die of boredom during the initial cadre.

Definitely not a REMF and blows things up in a small way.

Likes to boast of blowing things up and creating booby traps. Spends more time digging holes, filling sandbags, and getting dicked for any labouring or minor building jobs around the camp.
 

Dalef65

Old-Salt
Combat communications within the infantry sounds like what used to be called rear-link. Maybe it still is called that.
You could be carrying a radio while out on patrol with the section, or indeed as said providing a Comms link to/from coy/Bn CP as required.

Assault pioneer .... You will end up digging holes, filling sandbags, and other assorted manual tasks. You probably won't do much blowing up of anything. Matter of opinion whether that makes it a REMF role or not
 
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Hi all, just wanting some light shed on two infantry Roles please.

British army website advertises a "Combat Communications" role within an infantry Reg, anyone know what is involved with training i.e go off and train with RSigs? And what does that job do "out in the field"?

Next question

Assault pioneer within an infantry Reg -what do they do? I see they do demolitions, build fortifications +traps and dig holes
Is it a frontline role or is it REMF within infantry?

Tah

If you're joining the Infantry, there will be a lot of hard miles, cold sleepless nights, and a few hundred gallons of sweat before you even get to think about either of those roles.

Generally, you'd have to serve a few years as an ordinary infantry soldier before you can specialise.
 
Hi all, just wanting some light shed on two infantry Roles please.

British army website advertises a "Combat Communications" role within an infantry Reg, anyone know what is involved with training i.e go off and train with RSigs? And what does that job do "out in the field"?

Next question

Assault pioneer within an infantry Reg -what do they do? I see they do demolitions, build fortifications +traps and dig holes
Is it a frontline role or is it REMF within infantry?

Tah
Assault pioneers depending on regt are also the pipe band, corps of drums, bugles, etc.
 
Dead end roles career-wise. If you have ambitions to climb the ladder (as everyone initially enlisting should unless you're Ps & Ds or whatever) you'll want to stay in a duty (rifle) company or go recce/ snipers in support coy.
 
D

Deleted 166591

Guest
With Assault pioneers/Assault Engineer platoon you’ll dig. A lot.
In theory the platoon is trained to conduct explosive breaching, minefield breaching, infantry assault bridging and construction of field forts.

Signals platoon cadres usually take place annually and trains blokes to specialise as radio operators. They provide comm support to the battalion HQ and rifle companies. There is now a special focus on beyond line of sight (BLOS) systems including High-frequency and Tactical Satellite communications. Most run their cadres in house but yeah, you’ll have specific modules and courses ran by R Sigs. Rifle company exercises take place over a wide variety of locations. So wherever the coy groups find themselves they will have sig platoon elements with them.
On deployment we had sig platoon(s), whilst some of their lads returned to the rifle companies to distribute the critical skills and knowledge among their platoons.
 
If you have ambitions to climb the ladder (as everyone initially enlisting should unless you're Ps & Ds or whatever)

Jock - I might be misreading your comment

I know plenty of P&D's who went on to become SNCO's & WO's. 2 who became WO1 ( RSM ) and 2 that were commissioned - And I really do not know that many people from the P&D world.
 
Jock - I might be misreading your comment

I know plenty of P&D's who went on to become SNCO's & WO's. 2 who became WO1 ( RSM ) and 2 that were commissioned - And I really do not know that many people from the P&D world.

Not at all mate, numerous blokes who were in HQ coy, mortars, guns etc who still made SNCO/ WO2 through the years. However, with three duty coys in a battalion, you want to maximise access to the available PIDs (full screw, pl sgt, CSM) you'll be hitting juniors and seniors to stay on track.
 
Not at all mate, numerous blokes who were in HQ coy, mortars, guns etc who still made SNCO/ WO2 through the years. However, with three duty coys in a battalion, you want to maximise access to the available PIDs (full screw, pl sgt, CSM) you'll be hitting juniors and seniors to stay on track.

That was the point I was making

The P&D's guys I mentioned above all went Juniors, Seniors, stints in Rifle Coys as Sect Comds, Pl Sgts and where appropriate CSM's.
 
That was the point I was making

The P&D's guys I mentioned above all went Juniors, Seniors, stints in Rifle Coys as Sect Comds, Pl Sgts and where appropriate CSM's.

Which is fine.

The point I was making to the OP (who probably won't be back regardless) is that when you get to battalion you want to try and hit the ground running, take in what's being taught to you, excel on exercise, get your name bandied about as a future bod for PJNCO or a recce/ sniper cadre.

Folks get broken, get unfit, discover they're not really as 'green' as they thought they were during CIC etc., it happens and they then find themselves in fringe roles like HQ coy, coy G4, less savoury support coy roles etc.

There are sound blokes in P & Ds, pioneers, signals etc, some of them are even mega keen & 'green', but most blokes aren't in these roles as future trail blazers to CSM/ RSM.

If you want to work with comms, go RS, if you want to pretend that you'll get to blow stuff up, go RE. You shouldn't be thinking of going into these roles before you've even past training.

I don't even know why I alluded to the P & Ds tbh, I had a couple of guys in my intake who were pipers and intended to go that route after finishing training, which is why I was trying to inarticulately make a distinction between that and sigs/ pioneers.
 
Most people get disillusioned and leave the army after 3 years in a rifle company, regardless of any premature enthusiasms for specialist roles. If the OP is strongly attracted to a particular skillset, he should possibly consider joining the relevant corps.
 
Dead end roles career-wise. If you have ambitions to climb the ladder (as everyone initially enlisting should unless you're Ps & Ds or whatever) you'll want to stay in a duty (rifle) company or go recce/ snipers in support coy.
P&D’s are made up of two types, mediocre players who are there just because they see it as easier than being in a rifle company, and high caliber players who know the army is about the only place you get paid to play and want to take advantage of credentials gained through the ASB&HD. If you’re a good player you could eventually make it to WO or higher, but the reality is that path is already laid out within your first 6 months and there will be more sideways movement than up for the majority of your career. Look at JC or DC, one came from the SG’s and the other from the RSDG’s, no room for movement in their regts so the Highlanders pushed their own aside to make room for them as they progressed up the line to become DM’s. The pioneer role is what’s keeping the P&D’s in existence these days, take that away and they end up like the P&D’s from 1 SCOTS, disbanded and relegated to the past.
 
There’s a massive issue right there. How do you change it?

It's the nature of the beast, coy NCOs need to accommodate for the lowest common denominator and unfortunately in a duty coy it's pretty low. I recall someone drinking bleach (no idea why) and the subsequent shit show that befell that duty coy for about a week.

Either get good (progress) or get out (civvy street/ support coy).

I can only assume RLC EOD attracted a higher calibre of individual to work alongside and you didn't have to worry about blokes drinking bleach and other similar brain dead pastimes.

CSM's despair, it's better for people to experience that growing sense of massive disillusionment first hand, but up until then, let's fill prospective soldiers heads full of crap about a career in the infantry :lol: :lol: :lol:

There's an ex-USMC infantryman that has a good comic summing up how shite the infantry is for privates. lowly JNCOs. It's Yank but very relatable for us too.
 
There’s a massive issue right there. How do you change it?


Frankly, I'm out of date. I can spout chapter and verse on what could/should have been done a generation ago. No doubt there are many constants and perpetual issues, but I'm not in a modern rifle company and don't really know the modern generation of soldiers. I'm not entirely sure how to change it, but everything eventually boils down to leadership.

At a guess:

  • Keep the bullshit to a total minimum - Drill, bulling boots, floor polishing, NO2s and barrack dress should be verboten.
  • Whenever possible, have the blokes out in the field in small groups, practicing the nuts and bolts of infantry soldiering. Make it challenging, but keep it informal. Make training fun, and ask the lads what they want/need to practice.
  • If somebody can't/won't make the grade, can't cope, or really hates it, get them out - ASAP.
  • Don't impose PT and tabbing on the blokes like it's some kind of punishment or ritual event. Just integrate it naturally into field training.
  • Don't promote unpleasant people - regardless of their 'military abilities' if you're a bully or morale thief, you're ultimately a crap soldier and a liability.
  • Do encourage JNCOs to show moral leadership and teach the lads that you can be tough - and even hard - without being anti social, hostile or thuggish. Camaraderie and esprit de corps aren't just archaic terms from some old training manual. They are realities that make the difference between a happy well-manned battalion and a unhappy undermanned battalion.
  • Treat soldiers like adults. If they don't behave like adults, take a long hard look at the standard of leadership that the battalion hierarchy is providing.
  • Study the highly successful recruiting methods that the Green Howards used. Adapt them as needed.
  • Soldiering - and army life - is supposed to be enjoyable. Someone forgot that somewhere along the line.

It's possibly a separate issue, but I think that the integration of women into the infantry will inevitably further damage morale. It won't happen immediately, but standards will slip, unit cohesion will be reduced, and the blokes will lose pride in cap badge and role. I'd be delighted to be proved wrong, but I'm convinced that will be the reality within a decade or so.
 
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