INF transfer to AGC (RMP)

Fraz34

Crow
Ladies and Gents,

Thanks for the time reading this I'll try to keep it sort and sweet.

I am looking to transfer to AGC (RMP) after serving 11 years in the Infantry holding substantial Cpl.
I feel that it isn't the job I joined up to do (not only lack of kinetic tours).
I am in need of a career change and the RMP has always been of interest, since before joining the army.

If anyone could shed some light on trade training/knowledge of other people in a similar situation as mine the help would be greatly appreciated

Thanks in advance
 
Ladies and Gents,

Thanks for the time reading this I'll try to keep it sort and sweet.

I am looking to transfer to AGC (RMP) after serving 11 years in the Infantry holding substantial Cpl.
I feel that it isn't the job I joined up to do (not only lack of kinetic tours).
I am in need of a career change and the RMP has always been of interest, since before joining the army.

If anyone could shed some light on trade training/knowledge of other people in a similar situation as mine the help would be greatly appreciated

Thanks in advance
This may help: https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/rmp-faq.299233/unread
 
What he said. The author of the indicated/linked thread should know what he is talking about as he is in the job.

Also @Fraz34, just trying to help here, if I may point out you hold a substantive rank and not a substantial rank, just remember that when you attend any interviews, it will prevent you potentially looking a plonker.

Career move wise, when I was in a mate of mine did the same move as you are intending from Inf to RMP as a Cpl., he loved it and moved up to Sgt very quickly after his transfer compared to his Inf promotion expectation. He had his eyes on CP or SIB as his final landing slot.

Good luck to you.
 
Ladies and Gents,

Thanks for the time reading this I'll try to keep it sort and sweet.

I am looking to transfer to AGC (RMP) after serving 11 years in the Infantry holding substantial Cpl.
I feel that it isn't the job I joined up to do (not only lack of kinetic tours).
I am in need of a career change and the RMP has always been of interest, since before joining the army.

If anyone could shed some light on trade training/knowledge of other people in a similar situation as mine the help would be greatly appreciated

Thanks in advance
Fraz, you'll be joining a long list of VTs into the Corps, good luck.

Ensure you've got the buy in from the right people, talk it over with someone you can trust. A lot of teeth arms get very hostile as soon as you talk transfer, especially to RMP, but persevere and its worth it.
 

Tiger-Monkey2

War Hero
I transferred from Inf to RMP as a substantive corporal in the late 1980s. For me it was a very good move and if I had not done it I doubt I would have had the good post-army career I have had so far.

I do not regret any of the time I spent in the infantry, indeed my infantry experience was a great help in doing my new job both directly and indirectly. For example I already knew how the army actually works and how to treat people with the respect they deserve be they more senior or junior to me etc. This is something the direct entry RMP LCpl has to learn on the job and it is not always easy.

However, RMP was much more interesting and gave a lot more exposure to the wider army that my own single battalion regiment did. The best bit was the level of personal responsibility and independence given along with really not knowing what would happen during the working day. In a single day you could be helping school children cross the road to dealing with fatalities, accidental or otherwise.

As a former infantry corporal it was quite a things when called into a unit to help them with their problem and the RSM asks me what we want him to do and what we need before calling in the RP Sergeant to tell him to assist us with anything we need. That may have been the first time in my career I was ever invited to actually sit down in an RSM's office. Not only that I was also offered a cup of tea!

Of course not everyday is chaos and blood and snot, but my own experience was that every couple of days you would get an interesting situation to deal with. In addition, I also saw a lot of things going on that I had no idea was so prevalent in the army such large amounts of domestic violence and sexual offences, deaths and injuries, and of course massive amounts of routine things that still take up time with repetitive paperwork.

I concur with the comment by Ninja Turtle about some being very hostile when you look into this. I had a captain actually say it was treason against the regiment. However, he appeared to be pleased to see me a few years later I managed to dig him out of hole with the German Civil Police.
 

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