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Inf or RAMC

#1
I'm in a bit of a fix and I'm wondering if you lot can help me out.

I'm currently at medical school, and I am certain about embarking on a career in the army. There are a number of attractions to being an army doctor, but I'm actually having my doubts about medicine altogether.

The alternative is to join as an infantry officer, which does have its attractions. However, I'm very concious that I have a good awareness of the downsides to medicine (having spoken to more than a few doctors who hate it) whilst I'm not sure that I'm aware of all the downsides to being an infantry officer.

So, in the interests of making a fully informed decision, can you lot (particularly those who are infantry) tell me the worst aspects of the job. It sounds like an odd question, but any sensible answers will be really helpful to me. thanks
 
#2
I should add that I'm on a six year course leading to a batchelors degree after three years, not the usual five year course. If I decide to leave the medical career path, it will be ath this three year point.
 
#3
had someone in the last intake who was a qualified vet but decided to sack that off and commission into the engrs. halfway through the course changed mind and went to the vet corp after all. Moral of the story is that you can always change your mind. I'd say finish the medical training then make a decision thus giving yourself more options
 
#5
blobmeister said:
Why not stay medical, do pilots course, become SAM (senior aviation medicine)...you will then need to purchase a huge rake for all your money!!
Whats an SAM, and do they really let MO's do the full pilots course?
 
#6
Yes I know...letting medics do the course? Senior Aviation Medicine (SAM) they are the specialist when regarding Aviation Medicine. Each Regiment in the AAC has then (and they are on a shed load of dosh (more than the CO))
 
#7
If I go into medicine, I'm more up for the surgical side of things. Besides, medical officers earn a fair amount whatever they do. Thanks for the replies so far.

If I join at 24 (after clinical school) will it then be too late to join the infantry?
 
#9
jew_unit said:
If I go into medicine, I'm more up for the surgical side of things. Besides, medical officers earn a fair amount whatever they do. Thanks for the replies so far.

If I join at 24 (after clinical school) will it then be too late to join the infantry?
No.
 
#10
If it's not too late to become an infantry officer at 24 then I'll complete clinical school and leave my options open. Thanks for the help guys.
 
#11
There is a regulation on the QRs stating that any medically qualified officer HAS to be capbadged RAMC.

At least that true in the TA (couldn't find the appropriate reference in regular QRs):

"4.016.

c. Qualified medical practitioners and dentists are eligible only for appointments as medical officers in the RAMC
or in the RADC respectively."

Whether or not that is enforced, I do not know, but you will have a hard time persuading them to ignore the medical qualification and let you go infantry.

Better plan (I suspect): get your medical degree, get through the PQO recruitment process, and apply to be a GDMO of an infantry unit. You'll be far enough forward at the RAP to feel the heat.

FF
(RAMC(V))
 
#12
I'll bite,

so your thinking about being a Doctor, you've not even qualified yet your still looking toward Inf, perhaps you ought to question your personal drving forces.

Personally; I don't think you either/or; Cadets boring?
 
#13
Dr or Inf?? if this is real here are my thoughts...

A year at RMAS after Med School will almost certainly put you off of the life of the Infanteer for the rest of your Army career.

Why do you think the aforementioned vet retraced his path?

It all sounds very romantic but don't be fooled - look beyond the age that you can no longer do CFTs and you're knees are shot away...

The best advice I've seen here is the Av Med route - Pilot and Dr = an interesting time.

Have fun whichever way you go.

G
 
#14
I know of someone who was in the same position. He was fully qualified as a doctor and had done 4 para as a tom. He rocked up to our platoon in jan and just cracked on like one of the gus. I don't know how he got so far but he had managed to get onto the reg rmas course. Three weeks later he was off, having had the coy cmmdr and above work on him. He reappeared in october with three pips on his chest and then did tarts and vics and was fully commissioned before we had finished seniors. If I recall correctly he had spent the period in between having a look see at the army and helping out with various bits and pieces.
 
#15
Stay with medicine but while you're at Uni join the local TA infantry unit. If you like it that much then sure bin the Medical Degree and join the Regulars.
By that stage you will have had a good few years as a TA infantryman/Officer.
 
#16
I agree with bell, you could even do a tour after you finish your med degree as an infantrymen/officer, and then go to RMAS and beomce a reg MO. Just a thought.
 
#17
There has been recent enforcement of QRs with reference to commissioning of medically qualified officers (in the regular Army).

Specialist in Aviation Medicine appts are via the occ med route, and require you to GP train first. Most RMO appts are now assigned to qualified GPs - expect to be a GDMO.

If you want to do surgery, you have to really want to (speaking as someone doing it). If you're so unsure you'd consider binning medicine or want to be "greener", don't pile straight into surgical training.
 
#18
I know of at least 2 Doctors that were required to leave the 44 week CC and convert to PQO and badge RAMC. It seems the same does not apply to other allied health professionals / PQO CEG's - I know a physio that did 6 years RE after uni before switching to RAMC as a physio when his 6 year SC was drawing to a close. There are a few young docs sporting para wings that they acquired through 4 Para, 21 SAS and 144 Para Med Sqn while going through med school. I know a retired RAMC Lt Col who started as a inf sldr, commissioned into infantry, left, did a medical degree and came back as an MO. You are young enough to do RMAS, serve a stint in the inf as an officer and then return to med school, complete your medical studies and come back as a MO with a good deal of credibility as an Officer. You will be very unlikely to get away with commissioning into the inf with a medical degree. The choice is yours. However there is scope to be a doc and do a whole load of green army stuff, including SF / Airborne Forces / 3 Cdo Bde. From a purely mercenary perspective, as a qualified doc on completion of PQO and AMS EOC (after FY2) you will be a Capt on £50k+, as a 2Lt in the inf you will be on.....
 
#19
captainchaos said:
I know of at least 2 Doctors that were required to leave the 44 week CC and convert to PQO and badge RAMC. It seems the same does not apply to other allied health professionals / PQO CEG's - I know a physio that did 6 years RE after uni before switching to RAMC as a physio when his 6 year SC was drawing to a close. There are a few young docs sporting para wings that they acquired through 4 Para, 21 SAS and 144 Para Med Sqn while going through med school. I know a retired RAMC Lt Col who started as a inf sldr, commissioned into infantry, left, did a medical degree and came back as an MO. You are young enough to do RMAS, serve a stint in the inf as an officer and then return to med school, complete your medical studies and come back as a MO with a good deal of credibility as an Officer. You will be very unlikely to get away with commissioning into the inf with a medical degree. The choice is yours. However there is scope to be a doc and do a whole load of green army stuff, including SF / Airborne Forces / 3 Cdo Bde. From a purely mercenary perspective, as a qualified doc on completion of PQO and AMS EOC (after FY2) you will be a Capt on £50k+, as a 2Lt in the inf you will be on.....
Thanks for that. I'm certainly considering taking time out in the middle of my course to serve as a subbie for a bit.

If I am succesful in selection for a cadetship, and then accept it, would I be allowed to serve with 144 through clinical school? I assume that 4 PARA and 21 SAS are out as I would be comissioned into the RAMC.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#20
21 SAS had a squadron commander who was a well-known cardiologist, for what it's worth.

In a vaguely related vein, I worked with a a guy who qualified as a vet and then joined SIS, and my late father in law was a doctor who served as a cavalry officer. These things are possible though I would suggest that if you take sponsorship from the army, then you will have to go down the RAMC route.

As it happens, my brother was a Naval medical cadet. Apart from doing an advanced BTLS course with the US Navy, he did s0d-all military stuff whilst at medical school.
 

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