Indian Sub explosion

#1
#4
Horrible things D boats. Fire and batteries dont make good friends.

Hope they get the survivors out, least its dockside.
 
#7
Wonder if there is a Pakistani gentleman stood nearby whistling innocently?
 
#8
On the eve of India's Independence Day. No connection I suppose.
 
#9
Looks like it's had a previous explosion in 2010...

A fire broke out aboard INS Sindhurakshak while the vessel was in Visakhapatnam in February 2010. One sailor was killed and two others injured. Navy officials reported that the fire had been caused by an explosion in the submarine's battery compartment, due to a faulty battery valve that leaked hydrogen.[5][6]
Poor souls on board...not looking good for them:

Submarine INS Sindhurakshak sinks after major blast in Mumbai; all 18 feared dead | Deccan Chronicle
 
#10
Second fire on that boat, it had to have a russky refit after a battery/hydrogen fire in 2010....sounds like a lucky ship!
 
#11
In the article redshift links the last paragraph is quite telling;
In 2011, a surface warship INS Vindhyagiri caught fire when it collided with a merchant vessel near the Mumbai harbour while returning from a picnic with families of group of officers deployed on board. On its way back, it hit another ship leaving the harbour. Nobody was injured but the warship was virtually ruined.
 
#13
The problem the Indian Navy have is that they, in common with the other Indian Armed Forces and in order to counter accusations of nepotism and favouritism, use a single stream timed promotion scheme:

Navy - Promotion policy followed in the Navy is as follows :

By time scale

Ag.Su.Lieut to Sub Lieut Inducted as commissioned officer

Sub Lieut to Lieut 4 years of Commissioned Service

Lieut to Lieut Cdr. 10 years seniority as Lieut

Lieut Cdr. to Cdr. 20 years (reckonable commissioned service)

(if not promoted by selection)

By Selection

Lieut Cdr. to Cdr. 2-8 years seniority as Lieut Cdr.

Cdr. to Capt. 4 years seniority as Cdr.

Capt. to Rear Admiral and above. No service restriction

Basically join up, get married (important somehow) and wait...one day your ship will come!

Sadly, in the absence of other criteria, the sea has it's own methods to weed out incompetence.
 
#14
In the article redshift links the last paragraph is quite telling;
In 2011, a surface warship INS Vindhyagiri caught fire when it collided with a merchant vessel near the Mumbai harbour while returning from a picnic with families of group of officers deployed on board. On its way back, it hit another ship leaving the harbour. Nobody was injured but the warship was virtually ruined.
Well to be fair it's not as though our lot haven't had the occasional prang over the years, and in the captain of the Vindhyagiri defence at least it was a moving target, not like he hit a charted sea floor feature or anything. But as cernunnos pointed out their apparent automatic promotion system does seem somewhat questionable.
 
#16
Now it's back to the Indian Sub Continent.......



Ah I need more tea.
 

Subsunk

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#19
The blast is likely to be either from the batteries (if they were being charged, hydrogen is generated with the associated explosion risks) or the ordnance. The magnitude of the blast suggests ordnance.

Competence: Indian Navy is expanding massively, and so experienced personnel will be in short supply. Given their current nuclear attack submarine program's high profile, their experienced guys are likely to be assigned there in preference to their SSK flotilla. Also, a submarine is at greater risk when it is alongside in harbour - when systems are down for maintenance, when every man and his dog is on board doing trials, repairs etc and when the boat is often fully opened up (the RN nearly lost HMSM ARTEMIS when alongside in Gosport during this time).

From the submarine escape perspective, a downed submarine in a dockyard is as good as it gets, as the situation starts out with a known datum, so cutting out the search phase. Also, a lot of the required assets are on hand. Unfortunately in this particular case, the initial blast appears to have been catastrophic - it is unlikely that the boat was dived in harbour (unless conducting a static trim & incline dive) to begin with. It is far more likely that she was on the surface at the time - if internal bulkheads were open, the blast would have run through the entire pressure hull's internal volume, with greater comsequence for the crew and a greater chance of putting the submarine on the bottom.

In event of a sunken submarine, the relevant Navy can call on every declared international asset to help. The Indian Navy had the required assets in this case, as it is a shallow-water casualty allowing diver intervention (there is an image of the top of the fin with communications and ECM masts protruding from the surface). A SPAG's rapid but lightly-equipped capability would not have counted for much in this particular case.

Sadly, 5 days in, we're not hearing any mention of survivors. The Kilo is a diesel submarine, fairly small and with limited survivor endurance on board, although I suspect that the blast did for eveyone on board. I hope to be proved wrong on this but we're starting to move into miracle territory as more time passes.
 

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