India puts Satellite in Orbit around Mars

chimera

LE
Moderator
So far sensors have detected no signs of benefits offices or free housing.
 

Rab_C

LE
For a country where 1.1 BILLION people live below the poverty line (http://www.ruralpovertyportal.org/country/home/tags/india) that is a real achievement. So good to know that the UK Aid Budget was put to such good use.

50 million people in the USA population live below the poverty line to the degree that they are food-insecure - doesn't seem to stop them as a nation galavanting around the globe blowing stuff up, nor nosing around in the Solar System.

The Indian space programme has brought direct benefits to their rural economy and although the Mars mission might not directly help the farmer with planning his crop it does help India as a technology-economy. That feeds back into employment and competitive advantages.

They're playing a long-game to dominate space technology as soundly as they do business software; first they have to demonstrate what they can do.
 
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Having worked with Indian trained professionals in my industry, I know I for one would not put my trust/life into the hands of an Indian trained medic unless absolutely nessacery.

Not disagreeing with your opinion but it does surprise me. When I taught at t University, I found that in most cases the Indian students were better educated and informed, with more enquiring minds and indeed usually a better standard of English, than their UK counterparts.
 
How much better off would the UK had been, had the government of the day not decided to hand over all the UKs rocket technology to France and walk away from space technology.

The rational was to invest more in social housing, which perhaps worked short term, but how much could have been invested in the longer term with a bit more fore thought
 

Rab_C

LE
Not disagreeing with your opinion but it does surprise me. When I taught at t University, I found that in most cases the Indian students were better educated and informed, with more enquiring minds and indeed usually a better standard of English, than their UK counterparts.
My experience has been that trying to get them to actually make a decision or think outside the box is a painful endeavour. To get them to own up to not knowing something is nigh on impossible, this is what scares me about their medical profession. I do not work in medicine but in a technical job so I am dealing with "qualified" engineers.
 
Not disagreeing with your opinion but it does surprise me. When I taught at t University, I found that in most cases the Indian students were better educated and informed, with more enquiring minds and indeed usually a better standard of English, than their UK counterparts.

Within the aerospace industry its widely accepted that certain groups provide fantastic hard workers, who will do whatever they are told to a high standard.

The crucial word s though is as they are told, something about their culture, education or training or perhaps just a natural deference and lack of confidence makes most of them (in general) hopeless at fault finding. Perhaps that's wher Rab C is coming from


Edit to add beaten to it
 
Having worked with Indian trained professionals in my industry, I know I for one would not put my trust/life into the hands of an Indian trained medic unless absolutely nessacery.

Having had Acute angle closure Glaucoma, misdiagnosed last year as migraine by a Scottish born educated and trained doctor, and as a result being in acute pain for two days, before being blue lighted to hospital and having four operations in a week,I wonder. I now have permanent damage to the sight in my left eye.
 
T

trojan

Guest
My experience has been that trying to get them to actually make a decision or think outside the box is a painful endeavour. To get them to own up to not knowing something is nigh on impossible, this is what scares me about their medical profession. I do not work in medicine but in a technical job so I am dealing with "qualified" engineers.

I also work in a technical job and agree 100% with your comments, you have totally hit the nail on the head
 
Pity it isn't a Bangladeshi satellite, they would have opened a take away by now.
 

4(T)

LE
I wonder at the same old same old criticism regarding India's space program, and if it does not stem from a little bit of envy.


Envy and sadness that we, UK, have turned our backs on aspirational and visionary projects in favour of spending every last penny on welfare instead.
 
My experience has been that trying to get them to actually make a decision or think outside the box is a painful endeavour. To get them to own up to not knowing something is nigh on impossible, this is what scares me about their medical profession. I do not work in medicine but in a technical job so I am dealing with "qualified" engineers.

I know where you are coming from regarding Indians owning up, however we are the world leaders in passing the buck. Septics can out do us all in back stabbing, the French excel in blank looks and walking away from balls ups and the Germans are the best at hiding cock-ups from everyone else. god bless the Irish for not giving a toss.
 
My experience has been that trying to get them to actually make a decision or think outside the box is a painful endeavour. To get them to own up to not knowing something is nigh on impossible, this is what scares me about their medical profession. I do not work in medicine but in a technical job so I am dealing with "qualified" engineers.

A number of years ago I was tasked with teaching selected bods of the Indian air force isotopic radiography, at an air force base a couple of hours drive from New Delhi.

On the first morning I walked into the class room to be confronted with 24 immaculately uniformed young pilot officers all looking keen and eager. My first question after introducing myself was: "Is there anyone here today who does not understand basic physics" (i.e. matter vs energy, atomic structure of elements and so on).

24 hands immediately shot into the air.

Now, I'd have thought that a knowledge of basic physics was essential to pilot officers. So I binned the first days training and started on the makeup of the hydrogen atom and took them on from there. It was heavy going, but what I found was that once they had grasped the principles they didn't forget them and, as someone else has pointed out, once you get them to do something they do it very well as long as you are there to supervise.
 

Tool

LE
I've not had too much exposure to the Septics/French/Germans/Irish in the technical environment where I work, but I agree with the "sub-continent" not being able to take a decision without a group hug. A decision, right or wrong, made by my counterparts here in Pomland is acted upon, and fixed by (usually) the same person pretty quickly. Our off-shore colleagues take a collective decision and then one person is tasked with fulfilling the decision. If the decision is wrong, the collective decision is reviewed by the group that made it, and a new decision is taken. Someone (perhaps the same person who fulfilled the original task, perhaps not) is then tasked with the new decision. This is time-consuming, especially when a team member involved in the original decision is not available for the new decision meeting. It also means that the person who completed the decision (ie. did the work) is not to blame, as the actions were as a result of a group decision.

I find our Sri Lankan teams are more likely than their Indian counterparts to take individual decisions, so I guess it is a cultural thang.
 
Envy and sadness that we, UK, have turned our backs on aspirational and visionary projects in favour of spending every last penny on welfare instead.

Something the Indians could do a lot more of in order to do something to tackle their widespread poverty, malnutrition, disease, sanitation, infant mortality, over-population, inequality and corruption problems.

I think that you may be confusing aspiration with nationalistic hubris.
 

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