Independent running as prime minster

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#21
5.56short said:
I'd never join any party that would have me as a member.

Besides, I want to know more about OFNH's "spuse". Sounds very dodgy.

Comeon biglad, spill the beans, what's a spuse? I've heard of a spunkbowser and a rangepasteglugger, but I've never hear heard of a spusevoter!
Sigh! Ok. Spuse; noun Colloquially a resident of a northwestern coastal area. verb to effect results in a specialised way. eg " she spused him until his legs went bandy"
adjective to describe amazement or awe. " It was a spusingly accurate stream of urine!"


Hope that helps?
 
#22
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Odinist_and_proud said:
Old Fat and Hairy,

Whilst I agree that being a one issue party will not bring much success, what needs to be remembered is that the one issue party can make enough waves to help gain the agenda wanted. For example, should a group of ex-soldiers band together and form a party which was to help improve the MOD, in particular the pay and life of the soldier/sailor/airman, then they would get a lot of support from the thousands of service personnel.

At a time when a large percentage of the electorate are not voting, then taking away those thousands of votes from the major parties would at the least make them sit up and take notice. This is what happened with the Green Party, now all of the major parties are trying to prove their green credentials.

Mind you, this would only happen if all soldiers made sure that they were able to vote!
This is a prevailing problem. The turn out at last couple of elections has been abysmal. The populace are afflicted by a severe case of apathy, and this applies even more to Armed Forces.
The problem is compunded by a large number of voters serving overseas, which makes voting complicared. The generally poor turnout of the election explains why certain elements of the parties are able to be elected. To put it into context, it is similar to the bad old days when the unions held supreme. Some 70-80% of membership were far from militant, and in fact, verged on the very moderate, but general misinformation, intimidation and a huge degree of apathy meant that most if not all vital meetings were attended wholly by dedicated militants who pushed the votes forward and played to their own agenda.
The same thing applies to local and general elections. It is - for the most part - the dedicated, the fanatical and the militant who make a great effort to vote, and to marshal votes.
We have to change the habits of the general puclic, the voting public in order to bring about a balanced result.
Is it apathy? Or is it a case that the major parties all tend to be more or less the same these days? I would say that a lot of people within the UK have ideals that are close to the BNP, but will not vote for them because of the Nazi connection.

Another group that a lot of peoples ideals mirror is the UKIP, but they have the problem of looking like a bunch of loonies who have been kicked out of the Monster Raving Loony Party.

The problem with fringe political groups is that they are on the fringe for a reason, whether that is through bad connections/history or due to bad PR.

Another reason is that there are so many people who will vote Lab or Tory just because their parents do!

Or, it could just be the fact that people do not like politicians, regardless of their political affiliations, because we just do not trust them!

I personally say that we get rid of political parties altogether and just have a government completely made of independant MP's, this would then have the need for them to work for their constituents, not keeping the boss happy to get a cabinet job!
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#23
Tradition voting really does exist. There are areas, especially in the northern industrial towns, where people would vote for a monkey if it was of the traditional party. In fact, in Hartlepool, they did vote for a monkey!
It was the same in my part of northern Durham/Newcastle. People voted Labour because the fathers had, and thier fathers before them. As a young child I recall marching through the streets with my friends chanting a slogan exhorting people to vote for the local candidate, and I had no interest nor idea of politics then.

There is a great danger of a right-wing backlash, and this is evidenced by the growing popularity of BNP, and the ever increasing exposure it gets in the media. It is now almost seen as the third party.

The problem with a government of independents is that there will be no cohesion, no support from other members as each will have their own agenda. This is evident in the US Congress and Senate, where the party system is not so binding, but rather local electorate interests hold sway.
 
#24
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Tradition voting really does exist. There are areas, especially in the northern industrial towns, where people would vote for a monkey if it was of the traditional party. In fact, in Hartlepool, they did vote for a monkey!
It was the same in my part of northern Durham/Newcastle. People voted Labour because the fathers had, and thier fathers before them. As a young child I recall marching through the streets with my friends chanting a slogan exhorting people to vote for the local candidate, and I had no interest nor idea of politics then.

There is a great danger of a right-wing backlash, and this is evidenced by the growing popularity of BNP, and the ever increasing exposure it gets in the media. It is now almost seen as the third party.

The problem with a government of independents is that there will be no cohesion, no support from other members as each will have their own agenda. This is evident in the US Congress and Senate, where the party system is not so binding, but rather local electorate interests hold sway.
My bold.

Have you seen our three major parties recently? I think cohesion can be a term left well away from them! :D
 
#25
The whole system is corrupt to the core and isn't going to change anytime soon.
All the parties, elect their mate to stand as MP, he then greases their palms as a thank you. Then when in Parliament, he scratches his mates back and is put into the Cabinet, where he greases the palms of those who helped him get there. They then make rules up to fill their pockets ie lets pay for your 2nd mortgage, travel to home, employ wives and family, oh more money for them.
The only way this would stop if if you weren't allowed to stand for Partliament unless you could pay your own way for the term of Parliament. Then we would have 600 odd MPs who were independant.
 
#26
OFNH, highthangu, that does help. If by the word "help" you mean:

Verb, "to help" - to forcably expel quantities of black coffee through nasal passage onto expensive new flat screen monitor whilst unimpressed client whines about extensive capital purchase of equipment destroyed during routine use.

Oops.

Made my 2ic giggle. Smarmy little cnut.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#27
5.56short said:
OFNH, highthangu, that does help. If by the word "help" you mean:

Verb, "to help" - to forcably expel quantities of black coffee through nasal passage onto expensive new flat screen monitor whilst unimpressed client whines about extensive capital purchase of equipment destroyed during routine use.

Oops.

Made my 2ic giggle. Smarmy little cnut.
Always my pleasure to assist businesses to prosper in any way. A small commission would be very welcome.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#28
Odinist_and_proud said:
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Tradition voting really does exist. There are areas, especially in the northern industrial towns, where people would vote for a monkey if it was of the traditional party. In fact, in Hartlepool, they did vote for a monkey!
It was the same in my part of northern Durham/Newcastle. People voted Labour because the fathers had, and thier fathers before them. As a young child I recall marching through the streets with my friends chanting a slogan exhorting people to vote for the local candidate, and I had no interest nor idea of politics then.

There is a great danger of a right-wing backlash, and this is evidenced by the growing popularity of BNP, and the ever increasing exposure it gets in the media. It is now almost seen as the third party.

The problem with a government of independents is that there will be no cohesion, no support from other members as each will have their own agenda. This is evident in the US Congress and Senate, where the party system is not so binding, but rather local electorate interests hold sway.
My bold.

Have you seen our three major parties recently? I think cohesion can be a term left well away from them! :D
Agreed entirely. Not even a pretence at it at the present time.
 

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