Incident at Castle Martin 14-06-2017

@Stonker Shot, out...

"There are a couple options. You can use a pick & shovel to dig down to softer ground if possible. If not a couple layers of sandbags underneath the plate and just past the circumference, but not enough to get in the way of the bipod helps."
If that's a Cousin answering, I think it translates as "We ain't got Jack Shit" :)
 
On rounds in the air, 11 seconds for 8km is a bit short, as the projectile will lose velocity. Assuming that it stays supersonic, time of flight is going to be at least 16 seconds, not accounting for vertical component.

Still not very long for reloading though
 
On rounds in the air, 11 seconds for 8km is a bit short, as the projectile will lose velocity. Assuming that it stays supersonic, time of flight is going to be at least 16 seconds, not accounting for vertical component.

Still not very long for reloading though
Woo hoo, thank god we’ve got a prominent ballistics expert on board.
 
Woo hoo, thank god we’ve got a prominent ballistics expert on board.
Don't get sarky. Anyone can have a brainfart. Vent tubes in Cents indeed.
 
Corners were cut and it was openly discussed by mortar men. Speed was the thing. Which can cause the above scenario. I also remember Army boards meeting behind closed doors deciding how to hide their dirty washing.
Anything from theft to drownings and deaths on ranges. Personaly I'm happy to see this stuff in the public domain. Lessons can be learned and potential recruits and understand training for war has inherent dangers. No bad thing.
You used to be on the Army Board?
 
Don't get sarky. Anyone can have a brainfart. Vent tubes in Cents indeed.
Do fück off you one nature wonder.

The “7 in the air” is a HESH myth that seems to pop it’s head up with each calibre, last I heard it was BATUS with 120mm and I remember working out it couldn’t happen then, considering three part rounds.

The point about ballistics is that they are not as simple as the poster alluded to, but I don’t you’d understand that. He didn’t make a mistake, he made an assumption.
 
Possibly the first few rounds and he was treading on the base plate to help it bed in.
The first two rounds were normally sufficient to do that Dinger, the order "Bed in , charge 6, two rounds mortar fire" springs to mind.
 
not sure he seemed to be doing it at arms length, the camp seemed to be in a shit location hills overlooking on all sides, the yanks were putting out an eyewatering amount of fire
The yanks do strange things, like feeding the rounds single-handed, and "hanging-it" as a matter of course which is something of a taboo in the British Army, with good reason.
 
Do fück off you one nature wonder.

The “7 in the air” is a HESH myth that seems to pop it’s head up with each calibre, last I heard it was BATUS with 120mm and I remember working out it couldn’t happen then, considering three part rounds.

The point about ballistics is that they are not as simple as the poster alluded to, but I don’t you’d understand that. He didn’t make a mistake, he made an assumption.
Oh dear. Another gob who doesn't know me.
I never mentioned "7 in the air"
As far as 120mm goes, you'd be lucky to get two in the air.
Don't get all snotty with me because I mentioned the fact you made a wrong post.
Errors can have bad outcomes.
 
I'm guessing here, being an anti-tank man, but if the baseplate was on bare rock, he'd mebbe be fretsome about it not being able to bed in.
With good reason, fire off bare-rock with no preparation of the baseplate and you're likley to see all three constituent parts of the mortar going in different directions at high speed, followed by the crew. Where the round would go is anyone's guess and likely to prove embarrassing when it arrives.
 
I doubt you could fire one off of bare rock. There is a system with these large canvass bags that go under the baseplate and bipod legs for fibua. I’ve seen it but never fired from it.
They were called "Rasschen Bags", after Dan Rasschen of the SASC (I think) who invented them. They came about as a result of experience in the Falklands War when Mortar Platoons had the predictable problem in firing from very soft boggy and waterlogged ground.
 
They were called "Rasschen Bags", after Dan Rasschen of the SASC (I think) who invented them. They came about as a result of experience in the Falklands War when Mortar Platoons had the predictable problem in firing from very soft boggy and waterlogged ground.
There's an echo in here.

See my #404 for correct details.
 
Myth.

HESH range is 8000m, Muzzle velocity is 732m/s, giving 11 secs to get 6 more loaded and fired. Including a reload of TVEs.
Forgive my ignorance,I am unfamiliar with the term TVE's
 
Forgive my ignorance,I am unfamiliar with the term TVE's
[nowah]

Tube, Vent, Electric?



The things that look like rounds without a bullet inthe centre picture.

[/nowah]
 
Ok #CaptainPlume , calibre of a Chieftain vent tube?
God alone knows, it's more than 25 years since I used them, although I reckon I could still do the loading drills (if not the stoppage/rammer out ones) in the CIM or whatever it was called.

Will have to look in a drwer at home. I have a single vent tube I was going to convert into a lighter, but packed in smoking & didn't need it any more!
 

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