Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

In search of good news... A dashboard of how the vaccination project is going?

No idea where you apply. A lot on the radio in the last few days about volunteers having to jump through rather too many hoops, way beyond the essential training. Govt Minister promised to look at this.
Without knowing your experience, you may well be this level, if you want to vaccinate then you need to be NVQ 3 or higher qualified in healthcare (or very similar). That equates to an experienced healthcare assistant level. There are other non-vaccinator roles available.
 
Only posted here because of the thread title's "good news" bit. Please move or delete if it thread drifts.

It would be very useful if those in the know could explain how all we have beens can rally to one more effort for the greater good. I am entirely happy to raise or lower a barrier, manage morale (You're going to die, can I have your boots?), or to explain that broken off needles don't normally lead to sepsis, come back in a week if the COVID hasn't already seen you off etc.

So, what is realistic? If vast amounts of medical knowledge are required in order to stab someone with a needle what other opportunities to actually help the nation's main effort are there?

GH

You need to have NVQ 3 or above in a healthcare type subject to vaccinate, so experienced healthcare assistant kind of level. There are other support roles available for those without that.
 

Diko

Old-Salt
Vaccination at the Derby Velodrome, first your identification is checked, second a nurse asks a few questions on your state of health and tells you what’s going to happen, third you get vaccinated, fourth you go to a waiting area and are checked you are ok, given a card with vaccine details and batch number then off home about twenty five mins tops. Marshals guide you thro the whole process.
 

tiv

LE
Vaccination at the Derby Velodrome, first your identification is checked, second a nurse asks a few questions on your state of health and tells you what’s going to happen, third you get vaccinated, fourth you go to a waiting area and are checked you are ok, given a card with vaccine details and batch number then off home about twenty five mins tops. Marshals guide you thro the whole process.
SWMBO had her jab yesterday and had a similar experience, there were a couple of issues however. The venue was a local church where parking is difficult at the best of times and I ended up having to park some distance away having dropped her off. Then there was a long slow moving queue outside on the pavement in the near freezing temperature and pouring rain, not a good thing for 80+ year olds. She was told to be there at 09:51 but did not get her jab until 10:59 then had to wait for a further 15 minutes to check for side effects. Still, she has been vaccinated which is the main thing.
 
SWMBO had her jab yesterday and had a similar experience, there were a couple of issues however. The venue was a local church where parking is difficult at the best of times and I ended up having to park some distance away having dropped her off. Then there was a long slow moving queue outside on the pavement in the near freezing temperature and pouring rain, not a good thing for 80+ year olds. She was told to be there at 09:51 but did not get her jab until 10:59 then had to wait for a further 15 minutes to check for side effects. Still, she has been vaccinated which is the main thing.
Aye, fingers crossed by the time my turn rolls around the weather should be a bit better.
 
You don't have to wait your turn. I paid £100 online, turned up at some house, dropped my trousers, bent over, and 15 mins of the fella grunting while he tried to find the right vein and it was sorted.
 

3ToedSloth

War Hero
You don't have to wait your turn. I paid £100 online, turned up at some house, dropped my trousers, bent over, and 15 mins of the fella grunting while he tried to find the right vein and it was sorted.

If anyone wants to jump the queue I can sort them out with a fake over-75 ID card for a very reasonable price.
 

tiv

LE
SWMBO had her jab yesterday and had a similar experience, there were a couple of issues however. The venue was a local church where parking is difficult at the best of times and I ended up having to park some distance away having dropped her off. Then there was a long slow moving queue outside on the pavement in the near freezing temperature and pouring rain, not a good thing for 80+ year olds. She was told to be there at 09:51 but did not get her jab until 10:59 then had to wait for a further 15 minutes to check for side effects. Still, she has been vaccinated which is the main thing.
It was my turn yesterday and, although warmer and dry, there was still a queue along the pavement outside that had lengthened appreciably by the time I got out. And this was at 16:20. Clearly there is a missmatch between the number of people being sent for and the capacity of the system. Still, better that than having the inoculators waiting for customers. To be far to them there was a chap keeping an eye on the queue and he asked if I had problems probably as I have to use a stick due to leg problems and was wobbling about a bit. When I explained that I have trouble standing still he took me to the front of the queue.

It's not like the flu jab where you turn up, get jabbed and go. When you get in there is a registration process and you get issued with a card then on to an inoculator where, before the jab, there are a number of questions and a lot of computer stuff. Then, as it was the Pfizer vaccine, a 15 minute wait.
 
It's not like the flu jab where you turn up, get jabbed and go. When you get in there is a registration process and you get issued with a card then on to an inoculator where, before the jab, there are a number of questions and a lot of computer stuff. Then, as it was the Pfizer vaccine, a 15 minute wait.
Nothing is going to be perfect in a vaccine project designed to deliver in the region of 130 million doses. I'm bored already of the media (for which you may read the Nagging Muntjac) attacking the small deficiencies rather than praising the success - leave aside the fact the same people bemoaned Boris' refusal to join the EU scheme.

Whilst I am sorry that the elderly were held in a queue even you, quite rightly, acknowledged that time for the retired to queue is less of an issue than the vaccination team standing idle, the up shot of which leads to wasted doses.

All vaccines have a fifteen minute cooling off period.

The twelve week wait for the second jab, however, I am less supportive of.
 
Nothing is going to be perfect in a vaccine project designed to deliver in the region of 130 million doses. I'm bored already of the media (for which you may read the Nagging Muntjac) attacking the small deficiencies rather than praising the success - leave aside the fact the same people bemoaned Boris' refusal to join the EU scheme.

Whilst I am sorry that the elderly were held in a queue even you, quite rightly, acknowledged that time for the retired to queue is less of an issue than the vaccination team standing idle, the up shot of which leads to wasted doses.

All vaccines have a fifteen minute cooling off period.

The twelve week wait for the second jab, however, I am less supportive of.
I agree, this is a genuinely good news situation and shows that for all its faults the UK can still do things right.

Sure there must be a lot of issues with oldies having to queue in the cold, messed up appointments etc but overall the country is doing the right thing. The entire system of government has been put at the disposal of those who are trying to protect the most vulnerable people in the country, that's impressive. It's only a few weeks in, mistakes are inevitable but I must say I raise my hat to those who are doing this (and I am no happy clappy fan of the NHS).

My dad got the jab last week, I mentioned this to an American friend, a guy who travels around the world a bit and has family, including elderly parents in NYC, and he said that my father was the only person (outside of people covered by the media) that he had any knowledge of anywhere in the world who had actually been vaccinated yet.

The UK is doing OK on this one, let's give credit where it's very much due.
 
Vaccination at the Derby Velodrome, first your identification is checked, second a nurse asks a few questions on your state of health and tells you what’s going to happen, third you get vaccinated, fourth you go to a waiting area and are checked you are ok, given a card with vaccine details and batch number then off home about twenty five mins tops. Marshals guide you thro the whole process.
Oxford vaccine no 15 min wait required.
 

crow_bag

War Hero
When it comes to the media focussing on all the little problems, which are inevitable when it comes to a project of this size, I think it is down to Boris/Tories, Grrrrr!

And bad news sells papers, gets more clicks
 
Did anyone catch BBC Breakfast this AM? (Fri 22nd Jan)?

Naga Munchetty was interviewing carehome owners/managers about the vaccination process, the latter wanted to highlight the high number vaccinated residents who had since become infected by this disease!! The makers claim an immunity of approx. 60+%, these people thought the success rate should be as low as 20%!

The owners/managers belong to a forum (like arrse) where they swap experiences, advice, etc. So it seems the consensus from the early subjects is that the vaccine is not as successful as we are led to believe.

Anyone else catch this? It was quite disconcerting
 
Did anyone catch BBC Breakfast this AM? (Fri 22nd Jan)?

Naga Munchetty was interviewing carehome owners/managers about the vaccination process, the latter wanted to highlight the high number vaccinated residents who had since become infected by this disease!! The makers claim an immunity of approx. 60+%, these people thought the success rate should be as low as 20%!

The owners/managers belong to a forum (like arrse) where they swap experiences, advice, etc. So it seems the consensus from the early subjects is that the vaccine is not as successful as we are led to believe.

Anyone else catch this? It was quite disconcerting
The problem is PCR testing. It was never designed as the sole diagnostic tool: even the designers are keen to stress that it needs to be used along with other diagnostic tools such as a doctor's appointment where symptoms are taken into consideration.

Coupled with the high cycle rate of PCR tests which would record dead fragments of viral RNA as a positive test, you're looking at a massive amount of false positives; a casedemic rather than a pandemic.

The purpose of the vaccine is to reduce the symptoms and deadliness of the virus so that we can live with it and get back to normal.

However, as long as we're recording cases based on just a PCR and covid deaths as anyone who tested positive within 28 regardless of co-morbidities or other factors, it can't possible be a silver bullet.

The WHO has recently updated its advice to include the fact that PCR tests should not be used as the sole diagnostic tool. However, much like its advice on lockdowns not being an effective tool when the societal effect is taken into consideration, it'll probably get a stiff ignoring.
 
...The purpose of the vaccine is to reduce the symptoms and deadliness of the virus so that we can live with it and get back to normal...

Would you like to buy a bridge? Very clean, school teacher...

There's a whole industry grown up around the fear porn and govts are loving their new found hold over the populations in their countries. If you think this will go back to the way things were, the bridge in question is going cheap.
 
The problem is PCR testing. It was never designed as the sole diagnostic tool: even the designers are keen to stress that it needs to be used along with other diagnostic tools such as a doctor's appointment where symptoms are taken into consideration.

Coupled with the high cycle rate of PCR tests which would record dead fragments of viral RNA as a positive test, you're looking at a massive amount of false positives; a casedemic rather than a pandemic.

The purpose of the vaccine is to reduce the symptoms and deadliness of the virus so that we can live with it and get back to normal.

However, as long as we're recording cases based on just a PCR and covid deaths as anyone who tested positive within 28 regardless of co-morbidities or other factors, it can't possible be a silver bullet.

The WHO has recently updated its advice to include the fact that PCR tests should not be used as the sole diagnostic tool. However, much like its advice on lockdowns not being an effective tool when the societal effect is taken into consideration, it'll probably get a stiff ignoring.
Well, it might be partly that. I suspect that it is more likely that a lot of people don’t understand that the immune system reacts gradually to the vaccine and it is several weeks before the full (60% or whatever) level of immunity is reached. So, it should really not be a surprise that more than 40% are catching C19 after having a vaccination.
 
There's a whole industry grown up around the fear porn
It certainly looks like it, all these conspiracy theorists running around proclaiming that the sky is falling.
If this ”fear porn” business didn’t interfere with the very real business of trying to control a dangerous pandemic, the sane people wouldn’t be so bothered by it.
 
Pretty sure you can thank the media for the breathless hyperbole and turd trawling bottom feeding muck raking journalism, where rational and factual reporting would be far more beneficial for all parties.
 

Latest Threads

Top