In praise of Sir Roger Moore.

I've been watching The Avengers, starring a variety of suits, bowler hats and matching umbrellas being carried about the set by Patrick McNee. Also some awesome cars. Each episode is a mini bond film, well dressed guy and female sidekick (generally far stronger character than any bond woman), amazing gadgets, evil villains, fast cars, terrible fight scenes. Predictable ending.
The New Avengers appeared for a brief time over here across the pond. It was sold as a Canadian version of the original series - as if anything interesting ever happened in the Great White North. ;) :mrgreen: Patrick MacNee reprised his John Steed role, and Joanna Lumley was the eye candy. They tooled around in a Jag E-type; probably 12 cylinder petrol engine.

The New Avengers.JPG
 
The New Avengers appeared for a brief time over here across the pond. It was sold as a Canadian version of the original series - as if anything interesting ever happened in the Great White North. ;) :mrgreen: Patrick MacNee reprised his John Steed role, and Joanna Lumley was the eye candy. They tooled around in a Jag E-type; probably 12 cylinder petrol engine.

View attachment 601537
Sorry dude, I'm not sure Steed ever drove an E Type in the New Avengers.....he was normally in an XJ12....


The whole series was a bit of an advert for BL products of the time, hence Purdey's TR7 etc
 
Sorry dude, I'm not sure Steed ever drove an E Type in the New Avengers.....he was normally in an XJ12....


The whole series was a bit of an advert for BL products of the time, hence Purdey's TR7 etc
You are probably right. I haven't seen this show for 40 years or more.
 

Awol

LE
Sorry dude, I'm not sure Steed ever drove an E Type in the New Avengers.....he was normally in an XJ12....


The whole series was a bit of an advert for BL products of the time, hence Purdey's TR7 etc
TR7, my shameful passion. I think the same car appeared in an episode of The Professionals being driven by a rather attractive secret agent.
 
Old Bill doing his bit for the second round.
Oh yes

bmaxirknszfaxther.jpeg


Old Bill's creator, Bruce Bairnsfather, was given a US Army commission in WW2. This is him at Chelveston on May 15th 1943 after a 305th Bombardment Group B-17 bearing his handiwork was brought home from Wangerooge having been badly damaged in a head on attack by two German fighters. The attack killed the navigator and wounded both pilots, the Flight Engineer/Top Turret gunner and the Radio Man.
Bombardier Bob Barrell managed to fly the plane back to Chelveston on three engines without radio comms.


cvobmbmaxt reportsz.jpeg


cvrew posztiokn.jpg

20mm cannon damage to Old Bill

Bob Barrell was awarded the DSC for this action, and received it on 25 July at Chelveston. This is him being congratulated by his fiance, an army nurse.

bmaxrrell.jpeg



But as the war reporter Andy Rooney wrote - there were few happy endings on the US air force bases in 1943.
Barrell was killed on August 31st.
 

Awol

LE
That’s the Volvo P1800. My uncle had one (although it was the ‘shooting brake’ [estate…] version seen below.)

Anyway, Roger Moore - always thought he received far too much flak for his acting; he could thesp with the best of them, as The Man Who Haunted Himself illustrated, but he clearly had far more fun, particularly in his late 40s/50s, playing Roger Moore giving a demonstration of his eyebrow movement.

That’s not meant as a criticism, since it always looked as though he was enjoying himself and made the film engaging - the fact that he sussed early on just how ludicrous the Bond franchise was becoming (laser watches, Lotus cars which actually worked, etc) and then played it in that spirit always seemed the best way of doing things to me. He might not have been the best Bond (however you define that) but he was the most entertaining.View attachment 601157
No sorry, he was the best Bond. For a start Bond was the quintessential English gentleman, so that immediately rules out Connery despite any claimed acting ability.

Moore always had a sense of humour front and foremost. One of the things I like best about The Saint is that at the beginning of each episode he does a two minute piece to camera, at the end of which, he gets recognised as the famous/infamous/notorious Simon Templar and a halo magically appears above his head. Talking to the viewer like this is pretty unusual today, but as far as I know it was unheard of in the mid-sixties.

In almost every role (with the exception of The Man Who Haunted Himself) he was always laughing at himself throughout the programme. The raising of an eyebrow is classic. I can raise my left eyebrow only, but oddly when I do it, women don’t drag me into bed, and bloody hell, I’ve tried.

He was special and I just hope he bedded as many of those co-stars as possible.

What surprises me is that at 19 he was a jobbing actor and was struggling to find work. One would have thought that he would have been snapped up by the first production company he came across, what with his boyish good looks and genuine acting ability.

So at 19 he was scrapping together enough change to feed his wife and stepson, and just half a dozen years later he was world famous and presumably raking in a fortune.

How fickle is life.

As regards his knighthood, I like to think it was actually suggested by HMQ herself. We expect grubby politicians to get knighted as part of political life and The Boss just signs it off, holding her nose, but occasionally there are individuals that pop up that you can just tell HMQ wanted to knight or award an MBE etc. There’s only few admittedly, but I’m pretty sure Sir Rog was one of them.
 
A little known tale of Sir Rog,

Despite him playing the part of the world's most famous secret agent, he wasn't able to fire a gun without blinking. He tried and tried but he just couldn't.
So in all films, if you see him fire a gun, he isn't, it is a sound effect added later.

There's very few who can. Clint Eastwood being one of them.
 
TR7, my shameful passion. I think the same car appeared in an episode of The Professionals being driven by a rather attractive secret agent.
S

The whole series was a bit of an advert for BL products of the time, hence Purdey's TR7 etc
By christ... advertising BL products in the 70s was peddling sit, wasn't it?

Awol, the professionals used BL for a season, before moving over to Ford. Did wonders for Capri sales
And yes, the production house had a 'stable' of cars, and just swapped number plates around. Muc to the annoyance of Plod.
Some uber nerds run a website where they detail what cars appeared in what episodes of different shows.

Back to Moore. Drove a lovely Rover and a Lambo in Man who Haunted Himself.
 
That ‘ooh nice arrse’ was mentioned by Mr J Clarkson as iconic and as an example of tv that, although completely harmless in any age, even today, would never past the censor now.

Sad times we live in, but I’m not going down without fighting.

I’m thinking of producing tee shirts with logos such as ‘Greta who? What?’ and other dangerously rightwing slogans such as ‘Yes, I’m a Tory, want to complain about it? Because I’m bigger and stronger than you.’


Or the much more succinct ‘Yes, I’m an Arrser, one day you’ll know what that is’.

Some bloke in Devon (I think) was selling tee shirts with the slogan ‘No, I haven’t got a fçuking loyalty card’ For use in supermarkets. They were selling like proverbial hot cakes.

Any more provocative slogans welcomed, I genuinely might do this, or start a thread asking for ideas.

I'll start to care, when you stop being a twat!

Edit: that's a slogan, by the way.
 
Last edited:
I used to build the Quasar, the motorcycle with a roof (and a Reliant 850cc engine). Out of the 22 that were ever built, myself and another bloke who tragically died about 25 years ago from a brain tumour, we built most of them 12 out of the 22.

As I I recall the engine was bulletproof. It had gradually increased in size over the years to a maximum of 850cc.
We never had a single bike returned. One bloke, who was bit of a knob in the first place (Simon something), rich, but dim, argued about the colour and he got the right colour (Post Office Red), but he didn’t like it so we sent it back to the spray shop and it ended up some bloody awful dull red colour, but otherwise the bikes were delivered and there was never a problem with anything. Like I said, the engines were bulletproof.

My mum had about four Reliant three wheelers. She failed her car test about six times, but she passed her bike test the first time, although the bloke mentioned above, who was my boss who died of the brain tumour, was the test inspector which might have helped her pass, but anyway, several Reliants from Regals to Robins and never a single problem in any of them over fifteen years, except your normal service parts, batteries, brake shoes etc.

Everyone laughs at Reliants (thanks Del Boy), but in fact they were brilliantly engineered and having a quite poky engine and a very light, plastic body, were actually very fast.

I've seen a regal being used as a trailer. Two brothers who run a local bike engineering service. Inventive.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
The New Avengers appeared for a brief time over here across the pond. It was sold as a Canadian version of the original series - as if anything interesting ever happened in the Great White North. ;) :mrgreen: Patrick MacNee reprised his John Steed role, and Joanna Lumley was the eye candy. They tooled around in a Jag E-type; probably 12 cylinder petrol engine.

View attachment 601537
I think not, my colonial friend, McNee drove a Jaguar XJ12-C, a 5.3 liter, V12 model built for the track, Purdey drove a Jaguar XJS and Gambit drove a Triumph TR7.
 
I think not, my colonial friend, McNee drove a Jaguar XJ12-C, a 5.3 liter, V12 model built for the track, Purdey drove a Jaguar XJS and Gambit drove a Triumph TR7.
In one episode, McNee chased a chap in an F2 car round the track, and caught up with him.
Oooh ooh oooh.
 

syrup

LE
By christ... advertising BL products in the 70s was peddling sit, wasn't it?

Awol, the professionals used BL for a season, before moving over to Ford. Did wonders for Capri sales
And yes, the production house had a 'stable' of cars, and just swapped number plates around. Muc to the annoyance of Plod.
Some uber nerds run a website where they detail what cars appeared in what episodes of different shows.

Back to Moore. Drove a lovely Rover and a Lambo in Man who Haunted Himself.

Ford Marketing struck a deal with ITV to provide the cars for free BL charged them for their products
Hence in the shows in the 70's the bad guys always drive BL or Foreign and the good guys are in Fast Fords
 

Latest Threads

Top