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In memory of the 207th Sqn - Lancaster F for Freddie september 3rd 1943

In memory of the crew of Lancaster F for Freddie 207th Sqn Bomber Command - and also of the men and women on both sides in the air war.

"F For Freddie" september 3rd 1943 is well known due to the fact that a reporter and sound technician from BBC reported live from a bomb raid on Berlin. I hope that my video will give you some new facts, and a little glimpse of what these men went through.

Search on YouTube for my channel: Historiespanarna to find the video "Experience a bomb raid on Berlin" and some more RAF related stories..
 

Dumbas

Swinger
Ex-216 Sqn RAF bod with my pedant hat on. :)

I believe the "two oh seven" and "two sixteen" squadron pronunciations come from the Naval heritage of these squadrons.

When the RAF was born on 1 April 1918, the RNAS Squadrons like 7 & 16 which went to the RAF had the number "2" put in front to recognise their naval heritage. To ensure history recorded the heritage, the word "two" remains.

For example, many of the old and bold would have gone on exciting adventures with like minded individuals courtesy of the RAF Tristars. (Some even arrived at the correct airfield during the correct month!!). The Tristar Squadron was known as "Two sixteen Squadron". Understandably, people often called us "two one six Squadron", but around the Squadron it was always "two sixteen". I never knew why until I got joe'd to give the squadron presentation to visitors.

Every day's a learning day....
 

aardvark64

War Hero
VR visualisation based on some of the F for Freddy audio recordings.

 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
Ex-216 Sqn RAF bod with my pedant hat on. :)

I believe the "two oh seven" and "two sixteen" squadron pronunciations come from the Naval heritage of these squadrons.

When the RAF was born on 1 April 1918, the RNAS Squadrons like 7 & 16 which went to the RAF had the number "2" put in front to recognise their naval heritage. To ensure history recorded the heritage, the word "two" remains.

For example, many of the old and bold would have gone on exciting adventures with like minded individuals courtesy of the RAF Tristars. (Some even arrived at the correct airfield during the correct month!!). The Tristar Squadron was known as "Two sixteen Squadron". Understandably, people often called us "two one six Squadron", but around the Squadron it was always "two sixteen". I never knew why until I got joe'd to give the squadron presentation to visitors.

Every day's a learning day....
In a similar sort of way, 208 Squadron is known as Naval Eight.

Jack
 
Wynford Vaughan-Thomas, who made that recording, used to live next door to my aunty in Fishguard. He was quite definitely the most interesting person I have ever met. He was a spellbinding story-teller and had an astonishing number of stories to tell. Sadly though, I was still only a kid and I just wish I could have met him as an adult and fully understood (and remembered) what he was telling me.
 
Wynford Vaughan-Thomas, who made that recording, used to live next door to my aunty in Fishguard. He was quite definitely the most interesting person I have ever met. He was a spellbinding story-teller and had an astonishing number of stories to tell. Sadly though, I was still only a kid and I just wish I could have met him as an adult and fully understood (and remembered) what he was telling me.

Thank you! Thats fantastic that you meet him! I will post your comment to the video.
 
Thank you! Thats fantastic that you meet him! I will post your comment to the video.
Cool. He's sadly long dead now (died in the 80s, when I was about 16). I don't know if you're aware, but he had a long career with the BBC and landed at Anzio and Normandy, then followed the French/US armies through Burgundy and then found himself in a Buffalo during the assault-crossing of the Rhine in 1945. As a kid growing up in Wales during the 1970s and 80s, his documentaries about the history and geography of Wales were always on TV.

When I first went to Normandy on my own personal battlefield tour, I went to the village of Creully, a few miles south of GOLD Beach, because it has a memorial to 4/7th Dragoon Guards and the chateau nearby housed Monty's field HQ for most of the campaign. However, when I got there I suddenly noticed that there is a bloody great mediaeval castle dominating the place and something suddenly came back to me...

Wynford had landed on GOLD Beach, recording all the while on a primitive device that was essentially like a record-player, rather than a tape-recorder that we would recognise. As he advanced north with 50th Division, he searched frantically for some high ground where he could set up his antenna and broadcast back to London and then suddenly spotted the castle tower! He managed to get to the top of the tower and successfully send his recording back to London, providing the BBC with some of the first (possibly THE first) eyewitness footage from Normandy.

As soon as I saw Creully Castle, his words came back to me and I knew that must be the place, so we went in (completely out of tourist season) and the owners let us climb to the top, where I presumed he must have made his broadcast. Some years later, during the 65th anniversary, the BBC showed a documentary which included an old recorded interview with Wynford and sure enough, he mentioned Creully castle. :)

His was definitely 'a life well-lived'...
 
I forgot to add that while I can remember fragments of his amazing tales of Lancasters, landing craft and Buffaloes, what most sticks in my mind is him feeding a one-legged sea-gull called 'Nelson' from his hand at his kitchen door... I was just a kid, after all... :rolleyes:
 
Cool. He's sadly long dead now (died in the 80s, when I was about 16). I don't know if you're aware, but he had a long career with the BBC and landed at Anzio and Normandy, then followed the French/US armies through Burgundy and then found himself in a Buffalo during the assault-crossing of the Rhine in 1945. As a kid growing up in Wales during the 1970s and 80s, his documentaries about the history and geography of Wales were always on TV.

When I first went to Normandy on my own personal battlefield tour, I went to the village of Creully, a few miles south of GOLD Beach, because it has a memorial to 4/7th Dragoon Guards and the chateau nearby housed Monty's field HQ for most of the campaign. However, when I got there I suddenly noticed that there is a bloody great mediaeval castle dominating the place and something suddenly came back to me...

Wynford had landed on GOLD Beach, recording all the while on a primitive device that was essentially like a record-player, rather than a tape-recorder that we would recognise. As he advanced north with 50th Division, he searched frantically for some high ground where he could set up his antenna and broadcast back to London and then suddenly spotted the castle tower! He managed to get to the top of the tower and successfully send his recording back to London, providing the BBC with some of the first (possibly THE first) eyewitness footage from Normandy.

As soon as I saw Creully Castle, his words came back to me and I knew that must be the place, so we went in (completely out of tourist season) and the owners let us climb to the top, where I presumed he must have made his broadcast. Some years later, during the 65th anniversary, the BBC showed a documentary which included an old recorded interview with Wynford and sure enough, he mentioned Creully castle. :)

His was definitely 'a life well-lived'...
Wow that castle tower sure was the place to be! Juno beach beneath him and German held Caen to close for comfort – and all of Overlord in all directions...

And as you say the recording equipment used – cutting an acetate covered aluminium disc. When doing the recording on F for Freddie they had to keep the discs warm inside their flying jackets, and when the bombs where released the recording needle cut through to the aluminium, making a distinct noise.
 

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