In honour of our glorious dead... Act now.

#1
Last November, I placed a framed photograph of a friend I lost in Iraq on the cenotaph in Worcester. Within the frame, I included a small card explaining who he was and that he was killed in action.

Now, 7 months later, the picture is still there. Sometimes people leave flowers, and people I have never told about it have mentioned it in conversation.

To raise awareness and respect for our dead, I propose that when a soldier from a certain recruiting area is killed, each member of the site from that area - providing they're able - print their picture from the MoD site, place it in a frame with an information card and leave it at their local cenotaph.

Who's with me?
 
#5
Sentiment is agreed, but in this day and age will the pictures in all areas be left alone with respect.

I would doubt it :(


But it is an honourable thing to do none the less.
 

Fugly

LE
DirtyBAT
#7
RFUK, That is a fantastic idea.

Is there a comprehensive list available that has both the names and home towns of the fallen in Iraq / Afghanistan?

We may not have personally known the individuals, but some Arrsers may have come from their area and could help in the way you have.
 
#8
Wija72 said:
Sentiment is agreed, but in this day and age will the pictures in all areas be left alone with respect.

I would doubt it :(


But it is an honourable thing to do none the less.
When I left the picture at the Worcester cenotaph, I wasn't expecting it to last a week, especially as it was in an expensive frame. However, even the masses of chavs who hang around the area have left it alone. Perhaps even they draw the line somewhere.

As well as hometowns, I'd like to see every town in their unit's recruitment area pay the same respect. Between us, we can cover most of the UK and perhaps bring home to the public the real costs paid for our recent conflicts. It costs nothing and takes little time.

If you plan to place a picture, post the name of the fallen and the town here (bearing opsec in mind) so that we can keep track.

I've got the un-named WFR lad, at the Worcester cenotaph. RIP.
 
#10
Perhaps if your areas are generally unsafe/unsuitable to leave a photo, you could speak to your local church and see if there is a place you could place it. Either inside or outside.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
RFUK said:
Wija72 said:
Sentiment is agreed, but in this day and age will the pictures in all areas be left alone with respect.

I would doubt it :(


But it is an honourable thing to do none the less.
When I left the picture at the Worcester cenotaph, I wasn't expecting it to last a week, especially as it was in an expensive frame. However, even the masses of chavs who hang around the area have left it alone. Perhaps even they draw the line somewhere.

As well as hometowns, I'd like to see every town in their unit's recruitment area pay the same respect. Between us, we can cover most of the UK and perhaps bring home to the public the real costs paid for our recent conflicts. It costs nothing and takes little time.

If you plan to place a picture, post the name of the fallen and the town here (bearing opsec in mind) so that we can keep track.

I've got the un-named WFR lad, at the Worcester cenotaph. RIP.
What a cracking idea. Its strange that you see wreaths on war memorials past Christmas, un-vandalised.

There is a campaign just kicking off to restore war memorials for 2014. Yeah, I know, its 6 or 7 years before it will really gain momentum, but people are starting to plan for it in a loose kind of way.

The general plan is not only to clean up neglected memorials but somehow engage people with them. Teach kids what they mean. That they are about more than wars kids learn as aincent history.
 
#13
Fantastic idea, I think (perhaps naively) that the picture has stayed there because society does actually have some moral dignity, deep down beneath the hoodies perhaps, but it's there. Maybe I'm fooling myself though?

I'm in.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#14
amazing__lobster said:
What a good idea.
Yeah, I thought so. Its early days and all I know at this stage is what I've posted. At the moment I've had a call saying "You're in. We'll be in touch".

I'll post details as and when I get them. It will be a national campaign and of course, will be hi-jacked by the Politicos and press. But if it is going to work, it needs to work on a local level.

Educationalists, BL, other ex-servicemens orgs, local Council and MPs, as well as the general public.

RFUK may well have laid the first foundation stone?
 
#15
I'll make this a "sticky" for a while so the discussion stays live.
 
#16
A couple of thoughts/ questions:

1. I presume that the fact that photgraphs are in the public domain once released by the MoD would not require formal permission for members of the general public to print them off and place them in a "rememberence frame". Perhaps it might be worth clarifying that if the individual is not personally known to you and it isn't aone of your own phots you are using.

2. Perhaps the ABF or some other service charity might produce a small plastic/card frame with a place for a small card above/below the photograph to allow for details to be recorded, that way, with the emblem attached it is clear what the purpose of the photgraph is. I have a contact in the ABF and am happy to ask the question. It (probably) would of course, depend very much on the likely level of demand and interest as to whether this would be a commercially viable option, but if there is a possible income stream to the ABF then they may consider it. Alternatively I could ask if they would do a template on their website that people could print off (like they did for the Curry Lunch) in return for a small donation via Pay Pal.

3. I don't see why it need necessarily be connected with current operations. I would think this appropriate to remember any fallen comrade regardless of circumstances (such as a training accident, death in service not necessarily related to training/ops, as well as those fallen on ops). I would imagine the best judgement of those serving and former colleagues would know what is appropriate and not for a war memorial.

Views?
 
#17
That is an outstanding idea. I've noticed on recent trips to flanders and Picardy that people are leaving laminated or sleeved pictures of the fallen at their gravesides. In a way this detracts from the ideal of all the fallen being equally remembered by uniform dignified Portland stone tablets - but then again they were people, fathers, sons, brothers etc. before they were "the fallen".

I just hope that we have few occasions to carry out this excellent commemmoration...also in the words of John Pudney "better by far for Johnny the bright star, to keep your head and see his children fed". Let's keep up with the welfare and charitable side too.
 
#18
woopert said:
Thanks for making this a sticky.

First off, I can't see there being a problem with using the photographs the MoD have released. They're in the public domain and we're not using them commercially.

Secondly, we could use a card from the ABF or similar, but I'd be wary of detracting from the true purpose of the pictures. On the card I wrote, I simply put "Killed in action, Iraq" and the date.

Thirdly, I think the connection with recent deaths is important, but they needn't be operational.

Lastly, would it be worth me putting together a website with a list of our recent dead and perhaps a page on each of them? The site could include poems, videos and stories on PTSD... I may be getting carried away and I realise similar sites are out there, but it would give the press more of a story if a website were popping up on the cenotaphs.
 
#19
This is an excellent idea RFUK well done on that. The web site sounds like a good idea and hopefully all up in time for this years Act of Rememberance.

One question would we need to obtain the permission of the deceassed family to use the picture and make this memorial to the deceassed?
 
#20
easesprings said:
One question would we need to obtain teh permission of the deceassed family to use the picture and make this memorial to the deceassed?
Certainly if the details were to go on a website it would be the polite/correct thing to do even if not legally necessary. This is, after all, a highly ermotive and sensitive issue and ought to be treated as such (which I am certain it will, but feel it worth making the point).

The worst thing in the world would be to put a website up for the best of reasons and with good intentions only to be criticised for insensitively handling the feelings of friends and family. Exactly how you would go about ensuring this is another matter.
 

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