In Appreciation of Giles and other Cartoonists

Re TV - as a young lad I dated a girl from a wealthy family. Nice respectable lot. Grandparents had a big country hall, Elderly live in staff: housekeeper, gardener and driver etc.

We used to visit on Sunday evenings.

I was amazed that they had a small television room. They would go and sit in it and turn on a very elderly tv set, watch the BBC news, turn it off and go back to the Morning Room.

The telephone was also in an oak booth in the hallway.

Last vestiges on the 1940s.
 
Absolutely. However, it was 27 Feb 66, a few months before that roundball World Cup.
I’ve read somewhere that, after the Coronation, the greatest growth in home TV use was for that event.
My Bro and I got our parents their first TV for the London Olympics in 2012, when Dad was 98 and Mum 83.
Hitherto, largely thanks to the local libraries, none of us felt something had been missing from life at home.
 
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This one really evokes the family culture of the 60s. Its 4pm, probably on a Sunday, toasting in front of an open fire, lying on the sofa, granny is asleep, mum is bringing in the tea, the dogs, one snoozing on its back, the other (a Border Collie) is under legs. The cat, the mouse, the kids playing cards for marbles, the hammer on a chair (unfinished home maintenance).

On the mantlepiece there are things that were on everyones mantlepiece. A safety pin. Letters behind the clock. Scissors in a flower vase.

And the political joke. No one seemed to care about Harold Wilson delaying the election date. Everyone was happy.

This was my home in the 60s and I loved it. I felt safe and comfortable.

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So much thought gone into that cartoon, the child's toy car under the seat in the back room where grandad is reading a paper, the expression on the babies face sat on the lap of the auntie doing the knitting, the way the baby bottom right is trying to hold all the cards, the fact that the older child has won almost all the marbles, the other babies are left with two each, the slipper balance precariously on the end of the woman's foot. It is a classic example of someone who understood life in that era and was able to portray it via a cartoon.
 

Tyk

LE
So much thought gone into that cartoon, the child's toy car under the seat in the back room where grandad is reading a paper, the expression on the babies face sat on the lap of the auntie doing the knitting, the way the baby bottom right is trying to hold all the cards, the fact that the older child has won almost all the marbles, the other babies are left with two each, the slipper balance precariously on the end of the woman's foot. It is a classic example of someone who understood life in that era and was able to portray it via a cartoon.
My Dad got the Giles books every Christmas (guessing my Mother dumped the lot when he snuffed it), I remember reading the cartoons from quite a young age so they hold a particular charm to me. As you say there's so much detail in them, like the sailboat in the picture over the fire with a full spinnaker yet the water is flat and the sun shining.

Great talent in so many cartoonists and I love their twisted view on the World, satire is real humour.
 
Re TV - as a young lad I dated a girl from a wealthy family. Nice respectable lot. Grandparents had a big country hall, Elderly live in staff: housekeeper, gardener and driver etc.

We used to visit on Sunday evenings.

I was amazed that they had a small television room. They would go and sit in it and turn on a very elderly tv set, watch the BBC news, turn it off and go back to the Morning Room.

The telephone was also in an oak booth in the hallway.

Last vestiges on the 1940s.
1978/78. My sisters best friends family were all teachers and did not have a TV.

Her brother was a football fan.

He got a pair of binos and would watch the footy on a TV through a window in a house across the road while listening to the same match on the radio.
 
Another vote for Alex

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5430 swine flu PIGS 10.02.10 web.jpg
 
At the risk of having both Nelson and Wellington spinning in their graves - I have to confess that I prefer Asterix (books and toons) in French - they are funnier - some gags dont translate so are dropped or a less amusing line is shoehorned in
About the only reason I wish I was ok in French, so I could read Asterix in the original.
 
About the only reason I wish I was ok in French, so I could read Asterix in the original.
The mushlings bought me two volumes of Romain Hugault's 'Angel Wings' for Christmas a few years back. It forced me to download the DuoLingo app and start elementary French. I got there in the end and it was worth it.

I can definitely recommend the app
 
The mushlings bought me two volumes of Romain Hugault's 'Angel Wings' for Christmas a few years back. It forced me to download the DuoLingo app and start elementary French. I got there in the end and it was worth it.

I can definitely recommend the app
That'll be the L'App then....
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
I've always been a fan of Robert Crumb
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