In Appreciation of Giles and other Cartoonists

It's my dads Birthday on the 25th of December (yes every year) and for a Birthday present my mum always bought him the Giles Annual every year without fail. On Christmas Day after Dinner dad would retire to a quiet room, and for the next hour or two all you could hear was dad chuckling away to himself, with the occasional loud guffaw.

When he had read the whole annual he would pass it to me, then it would do the rounds throughout the whole family. Many happy memories evoked there, of younger times, and happy days. Dad is 90 now, so not too many Giles Annuals to go methinks.

Thanks for posting...
Nice one. Hope your Dad has many more years of chuckling ahead of him.
 
The thing I love about Giles is that the artwork is superb, the caption always funny but the true beauty of his work is the mass of incidental stuff, completely irrelevant to the main event, going on in the background.

The vicar lamenting to a farmer that he’d not received much for the harvest festival.

Above him, hanging sideways from the lamp flex; a tiny bat.
Agreed, you could see something different each time you looked at the cartoon. We used to challenge each other to see if there was anything they missed. Sometimes what you missed was funnier than the actual cartoon. Like the startled look on one of the babies faces sat on the floor in a corner when a mouse is running away with the food. Pure genius.
 
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An interesting addition to the thread I believe, although Giles is nowhere to be seen in this top 10! These ‘best of lists tend to be subjective, but on the whole, it features many excellent cartoons, some of which have already been posted here.
The greatest British political cartoon of all time
 
Cheney. Not bad, good level of humour.
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This means ability to portray political figures in cartoons with such satire is remarkable. The one bulging eye in Jeremy Corbyn is a classic.
I despair of the current generation of satirical cartoonists, though; the brute has been Leader on the Opposition bench for literally years and years and years, but when a Tory blows a raspberry at him as he tries to be desperately incisive, and he stops, raises an eyebrow over his stroke-victim glasses and attempts to intimidate, in a Beria-like way, I bellow with laughter. Nobody's caught that moment that I know of. We need another Gilray.

(Edit:: That glare is very expressive. My bellow is accompanied by a shiver. The mind behind it is thinking, with some affection, for the scenes which Solzhenitsyn wrote about; a cold, oppressive, hungry and painful life being 're-educated'.)
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
and some fun in the pub
I would imagine the soldier on the right is the one in the drawing
his name is Butch Shepherd, but so far all attempts to find him have proved fruitless

1583862877138.png
 
So its 1977, me and a mate of mine who was a driver with the Rice Crispy Tasters are taking a Landrover to Bavaria for Exercise Snowqueen.

He's driving, I'm in the passenger seat, we are five minutes out of camp loaded up to the hilt with food and Jerry cans. Im eating an egg banjo and reading a paper, can't remember which, could have been the Sixth Sense or something like that.

I get to the cartoon page, there is a Peanuts Cartoon, the last image in the cartoon was Charlie Brown with a sheepish, cheesy sort of grin on his face. After inhaling half the egg banjo and choking to death laughing, holding my sides, I show the cartoon to the driver.

But for some very smart manoeuvres we were almost upside down in a ditch at the side of a railway crossing less than ten minutes out of camp.

I was still laughing by the time we got to Bavaria.

Oh happy days.

Edit: A tenner to anyone who can find the 'actual'cartoon.
 
So its 1977, me and a mate of mine who was a driver with the Rice Crispy Tasters are taking a Landrover to Bavaria for Exercise Snowqueen.

He's driving, I'm in the passenger seat, we are five minutes out of camp loaded up to the hilt with food and Jerry cans. Im eating an egg banjo and reading a paper, can't remember which, could have been the Sixth Sense or something like that.

I get to the cartoon page, there is a Peanuts Cartoon, the last image in the cartoon was Charlie Brown with a sheepish, cheesy sort of grin on his face. After inhaling half the egg banjo and choking to death laughing, holding my sides, I show the cartoon to the driver.

But for some very smart manoeuvres we were almost upside down in a ditch at the side of a railway crossing less than ten minutes out of camp.

I was still laughing by the time we got to Bavaria.

Oh happy days.
The power of a simple cartoon!
 
So its 1977, me and a mate of mine who was a driver with the Rice Crispy Tasters are taking a Landrover to Bavaria for Exercise Snowqueen.

He's driving, I'm in the passenger seat, we are five minutes out of camp loaded up to the hilt with food and Jerry cans. Im eating an egg banjo and reading a paper, can't remember which, could have been the Sixth Sense or something like that.

I get to the cartoon page, there is a Peanuts Cartoon, the last image in the cartoon was Charlie Brown with a sheepish, cheesy sort of grin on his face. After inhaling half the egg banjo and choking to death laughing, holding my sides, I show the cartoon to the driver.

But for some very smart manoeuvres we were almost upside down in a ditch at the side of a railway crossing less than ten minutes out of camp.

I was still laughing by the time we got to Bavaria.

Oh happy days.

Edit: A tenner to anyone who can find the 'actual'cartoon.
Wot, a cartoon of Charley Brown grinning? More clues, please.
 
Wot, a cartoon of Charley Brown grinning? More clues, please.
I wish I could. I think it was a cartoon featuring the dog and the girl, not much said, just the facial expressions said everything.
 
This one really evokes the family culture of the 60s. Its 4pm, probably on a Sunday, toasting in front of an open fire, lying on the sofa, granny is asleep, mum is bringing in the tea, the dogs, one snoozing on its back, the other (a Border Collie) is under legs. The cat, the mouse, the kids playing cards for marbles, the hammer on a chair (unfinished home maintenance).

On the mantlepiece there are things that were on everyones mantlepiece. A safety pin. Letters behind the clock. Scissors in a flower vase.

And the political joke. No one seemed to care about Harold Wilson delaying the election date. Everyone was happy.

This was my home in the 60s and I loved it. I felt safe and comfortable.

9CD4BB46-DAC2-462E-99B2-C5E6A7FAB9EB.jpeg
 
........ he also was present when the liberated Bergen-Belsen and interviewed the commandant, who was a fan of his
Now that is a deeply unsettling thought !

How on earth can someone manage the mass extermination of innocents, and then be entertained by good - natured British cartoon humour ?
 
I just realised what is missing from that 1966 cartoon - there is no TV....

That says a lot.
Absolutely. However, it was 27 Feb 66, a few months before that roundball World Cup.
I’ve read somewhere that, after the Coronation, the greatest growth in home TV use was for that event.
What was it the late, great Alan Coren said: ‘TV is obviously more interesting than people, otherwise you would have a person standing in the corner of your living room’.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
This one really evokes the family culture of the 60s. Its 4pm, probably on a Sunday, toasting in front of an open fire, lying on the sofa, granny is asleep, mum is bringing in the tea, the dogs, one snoozing on its back, the other (a Border Collie) is under legs. The cat, the mouse, the kids playing cards for marbles, the hammer on a chair (unfinished home maintenance).

On the mantlepiece there are things that were on everyones mantlepiece. A safety pin. Letters behind the clock. Scissors in a flower vase.

And the political joke. No one seemed to care about Harold Wilson delaying the election date. Everyone was happy.

This was my home in the 60s and I loved it. I felt safe and comfortable.

View attachment 455386
I would have been the age of one of the card playing kids. It seems so familiar and also a different era but it was over 50 years ago!

I'm a kid at heart and like Gary Larson, Bill Tidy a d so many others but yes, it was the derail in Giles; the mantelpiece, the cat and mouse - so British, so long ago.
 

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