In Appreciation of Giles and other Cartoonists

With acknowledgement to @Trackpen and @Wightsparker and @Auld-Yin and to avoid the Next Labour Leader thread going completely off piste, I’ve posted this thread here, as it is clear there is a lot of affection for the sadly (long) departed Giles, a Cartoonist and War Correspondent second to none in my humble opinion. A great cartoonist should have the ability to reduce the observer to tears of laughter or equally, tears of sadness. Giles ticked both those boxes easily.
I have many of his annuals, plus a number of Specials (see below) and when I have a bit more time, I’ll try and post up my all time favourite Giles cartoon.
You may have your own favourite cartoonist, so please feel free to share them on this thread.


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Auld-Yin

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Dedicated to all on the Brexit thread(s). :)

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kimmi851

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I always had a weakness for Searle who could go from the heights of funny to the depths of his memories.
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Auld-Yin

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Britain has always produced cartoonists who, through a few lines on the paper have entertained and informed us. We are very lucky in that respect.

Pity we don't have a resident Arrse cartoonist!
 
Giles could do topical subjects very well, but I like some of his offbeat ideas...

 
Some of those cartoons first seen when I was a kid still remain clearly in my mind - the cartoons of Punch and Private Eye were a huge source of laughs.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
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Britain has always produced cartoonists who, through a few lines on the paper have entertained and informed us. We are very lucky in that respect.

Pity we don't have a resident Arrse cartoonist!
Perhaps we could ask Peter Brookes
I recall that he once drove an airplane for the sky gods
 
In the late 70s a Bill Tidy cartoon appeared in ‘Punch’ depicting the great secret weapon designed for use in the trenches of WW1 - a giant football punted out into no-man’s land.
3RTR Officers’ Mess contacted Bill Tidy and asked if he would sell us the original at a reasonable price.
As Mess Secretary I was tasked by the PMC to source and despatch his asking price: a dozen bottles of good 5* Cognac.
 
I always found Giles to have an infinite understanding for the machinations of the then British Armed Forces. His descriptors of the Tom, Tar, and Crab, be they Regulars, National Service, or Reserve never failed to accurately capture the griping and professionalism of the British fighting man, and the RAF, wherever they may have been serving.
 
I always found Giles to have an infinite understanding for the machinations of the then British Armed Forces. His descriptors of the Tom, Tar, and Crab, be they Regulars, National Service, or Reserve never failed to accurately capture the griping and professionalism of the British fighting man, and the RAF, wherever they may have been serving.
If you read ‘Giles at War’ you will realise why that is.
 
For the military cartoonist, I humbly offer Bruce Bairnsfather (9 July 1887 – 29 September 1959) , originator of the Ol' Bill series of cartoons during WWI, of which (arguably) the most famous of which was this:

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whereby Bill, a stoic and sometimes curmudgeonly Pte of an unamed British infantry regiment, offers sage advice to a complaining (and scared!) new arrival.

Bairnsfather knew of what he wrote, having served as a Pln Cdr in France and Flanders up to 1915, when he was invalided home suffering from shell shock.

Though his cartoons and sentiments are certainly of their time, imho the underlying soldier's story is timeless: the original 'Better 'Ole' cartoon had to be toned down a touch for home consumption as there was a bit too much destruction for sensitive stomachs.

He encapsulated the cartoonists art: humour, exaggerating the scene but still retaining the essence of what had been with a bit of social commentary thrown in:

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"The Growth of Democracy" by Bruce Bairnsfather (1917). "Colonel Sir Valtravers Plantagenet gladly accepts a light, during a slight lull in a barrage, from a private in the Benin Rifles".

For him, Old Bill epitomised the BEF soldier: indeed, they were men that he had served with and witnessed too many die or return scarred forever:

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'Old Bill' from Bullets & Billets: "First Discovered in the Alluvial Deposits of Southern Flanders. Feeds Almost Exclusively on Jam and Water Biscuits. Hobby: Filling Sandbags, on Dark and Rainy Nights". I feel that it was with a certain pride that he gave Old Bill the cod-Latin desription of leo maritimus - The (Flanders) Sea Lion.
 

4(T)

LE
Of the modern generation, I quite like Matt (Pritchett) of the DT and elsewhere.

He has a remarkable talent for taking a current affairs issue and converting it into a droll and whimsical cartoon.
 

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