Improvised Cooking in The Modern Army?

Discussion in 'RLC' started by B00MER, Dec 31, 2009.

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  1. I watched with horror the program Combat Chef, but what amazed me the most was the focus on Improvised Cooking (tell me that the Sgt who won the competition was taking the P'ss!!).. The focus on improvised cooking made the RLC look like a complete bunch of plumbs!
    But what astounded me the most was the equipment used for the field.
    I spent a few years racing around BAOR with Number 1 burners and 'adapted' lockers, if you were very lucky a No. 4 Cookset trailer (if you were really lucky it had all the equipment it should have)... In the Falklands at Moodybrook we used M67 (I think, they have U shaped tanks), scary bits of kit as they make weird noises but did a very good job, particularly with the ovens, grills and various bits of kit....
    I was shocked on the program when they showed the current bits of kit... They looked cumbersome, impractical and difficult... Are they?
    I just thought that in this modern warfare age and when the Army is deployed as much as it is that the chefs would be vital and unless there has been a huge swing that it would be vital to the Morale of the troops.
    I see that as many kitchens even in various hot spots are being taken over by Civvy firms.... guess what - staffed by Ex Army Chefs...
    This is all about shifting the budget from MOD to civil no doubt, but it is very short sighted....
    The word is that there are very few Army Chefs in theater actually doing the job - why? Officers who considder themselves from an ACC background should be putting the role forward more effectively..
    Apparently the person heading up PAYD is RE??? Why???
    The focus on improvised cooking isbeyond a joke...
    I am busy organising a 4/80 Reunion which is why I'm on these sites (if your ex 4/80 AAC ACC get in touch) but after the rubbish portrail of the Army Chef on that program ( I was proud of my 9 years, ACC and the espirit de corps) and the evident demise of the Army chef...
    The word is that the idea is to revert back to the dark ages where each regiment will throw their knackers in to the kitchen, some might actually be good at cooking and go on to do some training....
    Come on fight for the Army Chef!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  2. what a dull post...

    ...kettle on chip...
     
  3. Well you have posted a 'In my day...' post, I presume to detail your prowess over the current chefs and that no one is as good as you. Well things have moved on, the No1 cookset for example was not terribly safe and our chefs are as good if not better than the chefs of your generation. Different demands different conditions and different equipment.

    But as Danny has already stated - what a dull post.
     
  4. I am sure that you will enjoy your redundancy packages.
    No1 were of course a nightmare and potentially very dangerous... No 4 was ok but not brilliant, I asked how the new equipment was - no one saw fit to respond - maybe too busy hunting down a corrugated sheet to cover in mud to build ovens|! My point was that it's dissapointing that the Army has not seen fit to invest in more appropriate equipment.
    Apparently in training you are now taught how to cook frozen pies - need I say more!
     
  5. no
     
  6. In 2004 I spent a lot of time working up at our stores compound sorting out field catering equipment ready for various exercises. I never got to cook with the new kit, but remember remarking at how impractical, cumbersome and, most of all, unbastardisable (if that's a word) it seemed. There's a bain-marie sort of attachment which can barely fit anything in it, a solid top that takes an hour to get hot and two hours to get cold, and a complicated array of electrical gubbins which chefs aren't allowed to play with, as we're not qualified enough. (All anecdotal evidence provided by fellow chefs)

    I appreciate that No1 burners were dangerous, hence the introduction of No4 and No5, but why did these then need replacing? Apart from being a bitch to clean and a bit less powerful when used with anything less than a completely full gas bottle (in particluar the No4s), I loved them. A few modifications to the existing designs would have sufficed IMO.
     
  7. I have a No 4 that I have adapted it meets all Civvy EHO regs.... Didnt cost much either...
    I turned the oven around and welded the second on top of it (used as a hotplate). Took the burner out of the other side and welded a plate inbetween. Added some heavy duty batteries, fiited a 12v inverter now have limited 240V (can run a whisk / blender and lights etc)...
    Changed the gas connections to quick release.
    Added some bulkheads, water pump taps 2 removable sinks (hand / pots), a small lpg hotwater geyser, an lpg salamander. Covered a few surfaces in SS and covered it in a GRP cover, the sides flip up and I have fill in sections which gives me my roof then Tarp hangs off this to give me my walls.
    Up and cooking in 25 minutes... on my own! I use al lot of the original pans and equipment, the tables etc....
    No 5 I was heavy and cumbersome for what you could do with it - pain basically.
     
  8. The long winter nights must fly in your house..........
     
  9. Provides me with a living... Not all of us can afford (or want) brothels in Madrid!
     
  10. Looks like we both living the dream then!
     
  11. How is the Plaza Mayor these days? (think that's what it's called? I loved the latin clubs around the back....
     
  12. Iknow I,m harking back to the 60.s again but the no 1 burner was a killer to use especially in the tropics, we had a couple of casesthe petrol tanks exploding in the heat,but the army or the powers that be never listens in 67/68 myself and vms and other unit members of a REME W/shop in minden designed and built a complete bedford based gas fueled mobile kitchen, it passed through the TUV road safety and commercial mobile catering tests with flying colours,it was used successfully and provided quick and high quality food on many exercises,it was admired and the unit was the envy of many other units eating out of a number 1 bucket,none of the powers that be were interested in adapting it, when it was disposed of many years later,Technisches hilfswerk Nord rhein westfalen snapped it up, and it was used to provide hot meals in many disaster areas,I came across it last at a thw run sportsday in Aachen in 2002 albeit only serving sausage and chicken and chips but still working never the less
     
  13. When I was researching I came across a company in Gernamy that does a cracking trailer, walkin hotplate etc.. Cost thousands...
    I got my No4 for £125 though lol!! Yes it is legal....