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Improving national resilience

Alternatively it was fascinating eavesdroppoing on calls to discuss claims for payment for PPE in the first lockdown with astronomical sums being requested for items bought from freshly set up explotative web-based suppliers, when the items were readily available from supply chain (if the buyer could be bothered to put an order in).

Edited to add: Re: mop buckets - surely you are the owner of your own risk assessment and if you believe buckets A and B are equally safe then you just crack on. (what does a Covid-safe mop bucket look like?)
The problem is this: @Fang_Farrier buys from his own funds a nice but untested mop bucket. Ten years later the BBC report that the plastic used to make the mop bucket released Triphenylmethane 5 (the most deadly sustenance known to man snowflake) when it comes into contact with water or disinfectant or morons... you get the idea. Of course Fang_Farrier cannot have possible have known that his preggers assistant might accidently touch the bucket and produce an autistic child but that is no excuse! The Elf of Safety told him how to obtain a safe mop bucket an he should have the chit to prove it he complied with the order.
 
The problem is this: @Fang_Farrier buys from his own funds a nice but untested mop bucket. Ten years later the BBC report that the plastic used to make the mop bucket released Triphenylmethane 5 (the most deadly sustenance known to man snowflake) when it comes into contact with water or disinfectant or morons... you get the idea. Of course Fang_Farrier cannot have possible have known that his preggers assistant might accidently touch the bucket and produce an autistic child but that is no excuse! The Elf of Safety told him how to obtain a safe mop bucket an he should have the chit to prove it he complied with the order.
This reminds me of a skit on Alas Smith and Jones in the 1980s. Mel Smith was a Conservative candidate relating to a conversation he had with an old dear in the constituency.

She asked "why, oh why can't things be like they used to be?"
So I took away her pension and sent her grandson up a chimney!

We might chide H&S and the risk averse culture, but ultimately it has saved a lot of lives. Do we get to play with asbestos now? Does moving machinery have to have tamper-proof guards? Are we better informed about potentially harmful chemicals in everyday use?
 
Completely disagree.
With the exception of whole-life sentences (which I do agree could be expanded) the purpose of prisons should be public protection, rehabilitation and then punishment in that order.

Turning them into useful members of society is more important than fulfilling some Daily Mail-esque punishment fantasies. The US has harsh prisons and a keenness to lock up all and sundry, and it doesn’t help at all.
I agree with most of what @Mattb said with the exception of expanding whole-life tariffs. What is the point of keeping sex offenders, drug dealers, etc. alive? Rather than build more prisons try emptying a few of the ones we already have. And to keep the rehab lobby happy we can use the bodies as organic fertiliser.
 

QRK2

LE
Being truly resilient as a nation would meant no more Blairs, or Camerons. No more sofa decision making with no records kept, as opposed to properly conducted meetings with minutes kept. No more rash decision making with any form of PCDA - Plan/Do/Check/Act. No more basing decisions on assumptions, without documenting and testing those assumptions.

You obviously haven't a scooby how Churchill's war premiership worked and/or that it made a fair job of resilience.
 
There is a difference from moving from a hard world where the weak simply perished, to a more compassionate world where a social safety net began to be formed.

This has evolved to, sadly, a more ‘feather bedded’ world that has become an irresistible magnet for the aspiring poor from the 3rd world.

It has bred a nation where a segment of society exists that believes it is entitled to live on benefits, and the children are brought up to believe that ‘work’ is seeing what ‘benies’ can be fiddled.

Another segment that is taught by Imam’s that it is their religious duty to steal as much as they can from the kafir society that has given them shelter, and hardened criminals from Eastern Europe who know a soft touch goldmine when they see one.

We now have a ‘woke’ snowflake, massively politically correct knee-taking, easily led, health and safety society, where risk is deemed unlawful, but most punishment is considered too harsh.

Brexit has been a good start, COVID has provided a bit of toughening up, the venomous and vindictive attitude of the EU who we so generously previously financially supported has been a wake-up call.

A little adversity will do us all good, hopefully pull us a little closer together from where Blair’s devolution corroded the unity of the once ‘United Kingdom’.

We once had an Empire that girdled the globe, and gave global civilisations some truly wonderful advances that we can rightfully be extremely proud of.

It won’t happen again, however, we still have a significant place, can still contribute meaningfully, and hopefully, have retained the ability to combine and temper compassion, and concern, with common sense, resilience, integrity, and dignity.
 
Really? It was a Tony Blair initiative. But I agree, they are a PITA to deal with

Back when he wanted to be EU president, not that evening leaving the EU has probably diminished that desire
 

Yokel

LE
You obviously haven't a scooby how Churchill's war premiership worked and/or that it made a fair job of resilience.

I knew there was something I forgot to add!

In the crisis of total war and a threat to national survival, we had a coalition Government with talent from across the political spectrum. Experts were appointed to ministries and key industries. Generally these were people who had a good track record for getting things done, such as Lord Beaverbrook.
 

Yokel

LE
I also think that you will find that all of Churchill's meetings were properly recorded - see the national archines.

Churchill was not a dictator. There is a stoary that towards the end of the war, a decision was made after a meeting that he disagreed with - and he wrote 'round objects' in the margin of the minutes. A subordinate later asked who Round was, and why did he object?
 

Mattb

LE
The problem is this: @Fang_Farrier buys from his own funds a nice but untested mop bucket. Ten years later the BBC report that the plastic used to make the mop bucket released Triphenylmethane 5 (the most deadly sustenance known to man snowflake) when it comes into contact with water or disinfectant or morons... you get the idea. Of course Fang_Farrier cannot have possible have known that his preggers assistant might accidently touch the bucket and produce an autistic child but that is no excuse! The Elf of Safety told him how to obtain a safe mop bucket an he should have the chit to prove it he complied with the order.
If only there were things such a CE marks to make sure that products are basically safe?
 

Yokel

LE
If only there were things such a CE marks to make sure that products are basically safe?

It sounds like red tape for red tape's sake, like only being able to buy computer consumables for the approved vendor, who of course charges more. Which reminds me - why pay huge amounts of money to large contractors to do repair jobs in schools etc, when local business could do it faster and more cheaply?
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
If I may say, there are many good and pertinent points made so far, but if the desire is to achieve true resilience, that must come from people, everything else mentioned are tools and methods.

The point made about how all directly concerned have achieved staggering advancements in the Covid issue, simply serves to illustrate that when the chips go down, there are lots, well sufficient, people gifted and educated to scorch passed the melting point of snow flakery.

Given the perception that education, specifically PC encumbered 'no losers' indoctrination, has been at the root of the dissolution of national moral fibre, then we are in the midst of a social experimenter's wet dream.

Educational course content is being distilled to reduce the social engineering component, so that it can be delivered remotely. Stretching from primary through to tertiary, the mindset of individual teachers/lecturers is being sidelined in favour of content. Which, arguably, will deliver a more consistent product, perhaps without the overtly (left wing) political component of influence .

At the same time, students of all ages are living the experience of a pandemic, rudely disabusing them of the cherished notion that life must be fair and the individual, specifically them-self, is the important component of society.

If sufficient examples of the can-do, will-do spirit come to the forefront and displace instant fame, then the platform can be rebuilt.

My personal belief is that the Mk1A Human being produced today is just as capable as earlier generations, they just needed programming differently, they are being and they will respond with all the qualities you seek. Hopefully.
 
You do not want to emulate the Just Enough, Just in Time system used by the Big Four supermarkets. Trust me on this.
Morrisons a few years back Cod loin on sale 50p a kilo.
"It was all running out of date so they sent it to us, crates of it."

CO-OP Goats cheese on offer at about a £2.50 a kilo.
"They've sent more than we get through in a couple of months and it goes out of date on Friday!!"

Actually did ok on the last one. Went back on the Friday by arrangement and cleared out his stock a £1
kilo. Gave loads away and froze the rest.
 
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Never heard of anyone allergic to galvi steel. About 15 quid down your local hardware shop. Lasts for years and can be re-soldered.

Galv_Mop_Bucket.jpg
 
It sounds like red tape for red tape's sake, like only being able to buy computer consumables for the approved vendor, who of course charges more. Which reminds me - why pay huge amounts of money to large contractors to do repair jobs in schools etc, when local business could do it faster and more cheaply?

I think the argument goes something like "If we have a small number of larger contractors, we only have to manage and audit a limited number of suppliers. If we had every school make its own arrangements with small local contractors, how could we be sure that the small contractors weren't supporting the slave trade, sex-trafficking their employees, using suppliers of their own that we'd have to have them certify that they had vetted, that all consumables they used had fair-trade sourcing methods applied, that the small contractors were applying equal opportunity best practices, that parts and tools were certified to BS or CE standards, that all employees had been subjected to DBS checks, that risk assessments were applied to working at height, with children, in confined spaces, that PUWER regulations were followed and documented, that the contractors were compliant with Data Protection standards and regulations, that their transport fleet was properly licensed, insured and inspected."

Or something like that.
 
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