Impressive footage of the Danes in action

#2
chrisg46 said:
Or at least i think they are Danes....

Firepower...

If anyone can do a translation...?
Have a look at the pack when you open it - usually has 'DANISH' printed on the rinds...

Cute chick driving one of the wagons- right up front, too!
 
#3
They dont mess about Was glad someone else spotted the chick I thought i fancied a cute Danish bloke for a second
 
#4
Its odd to think that it's the 21 century and the possibly two of the best know and most effective MG's from opposing sides in world war 2 are mounted on their wagons (alright I know the MG3 has been changed from the original MG42 to accept 7.62 but you get what I mean).
 
#6
Blackcat said:
Its odd to think that it's the 21 century and the possibly two of the best know and most effective MG's from opposing sides in world war 2 are mounted on their wagons (alright I know the MG3 has been changed from the original MG42 to accept 7.62 but you get what I mean).
If it 'aint broke don't try to fix it.
 
#7
TheHelpfulStacker said:
Blackcat said:
Its odd to think that it's the 21 century and the possibly two of the best know and most effective MG's from opposing sides in world war 2 are mounted on their wagons (alright I know the MG3 has been changed from the original MG42 to accept 7.62 but you get what I mean).
If it 'aint broke don't try to fix it.
Absolutely, certainly a testament to the guys that designed them, btw did you know that the internals used in the MG42 were actually patented by a pole in the mid 30's.
 
#8
chrisg46 said:
Or at least i think they are Danes....

Firepower...

If anyone can do a translation...?
Looked at this with no audio. The subtitles are just CNR extracts, early on focused on en in a compound to the left of the entry point into the site - one mention towards the end of a single friendly non-critical casualty, picked up some mortar fragments in the face from a blue-on-blue.

Good drills, I thought.
 
#9
It does illustrate the cyclic rate of the MG42/MG3 though. The gunner was spending more of his time loading than firing...

Ok if you have got a big truck to carry ammo around in and bolt the bl**dy thing to , but was always a bit excessive in the light role. Holding one of these down on a bipod is a wild ride!

Also you go through barrels like no tomorrow. The MG42 was the main reason the Germans developed the swaged rifling method. It allows you to make barrels quickly out of crappy steel...

I still think the MAG/GPMG has the edge in the light role..
 
#10
HE117 said:
It does illustrate the cyclic rate of the MG42/MG3 though. The gunner was spending more of his time loading than firing...

Ok if you have got a big truck to carry ammo around in and bolt the bl**dy thing to , but was always a bit excessive in the light role. Holding one of these down on a bipod is a wild ride!

Also you go through barrels like no tomorrow. The MG42 was the main reason the Germans developed the swaged rifling method. It allows you to make barrels quickly out of crappy steel...

I still think the MAG/GPMG has the edge in the light role..
You reckon? Never had any problems myself, but I suppose you'll have had a lot of personal experience with the weapon in order to reach your conclusion?
 
#11
Those were some bloody long bursts going through that MG3...
 
#12
Tartan_Terrier said:
HE117 said:
It does illustrate the cyclic rate of the MG42/MG3 though. The gunner was spending more of his time loading than firing...

Ok if you have got a big truck to carry ammo around in and bolt the bl**dy thing to , but was always a bit excessive in the light role. Holding one of these down on a bipod is a wild ride!

Also you go through barrels like no tomorrow. The MG42 was the main reason the Germans developed the swaged rifling method. It allows you to make barrels quickly out of crappy steel...

I still think the MAG/GPMG has the edge in the light role..
You reckon? Never had any problems myself, but I suppose you'll have had a lot of personal experience with the weapon in order to reach your conclusion?
Yes, a fair bit over the years...! I even had 10 rounds of 7.92 through an MG42 - only on a 30m range and over pretty quickly...

My favourite LMG is still the Bren, but being mag fed is not really comparable. The M60 I find similar to the MAG, but not so robust. The PKM is ok, but rough, and the sight line is very low.

Living in BaconLand, have you ever had a shot of a Masden LMG ? Played with one, but never had the opportunity to fire it. The concept of a machine gun with a hinged breech is a bit odd...
 
#13
Remember doing an attack during Ex Runnel Stone in Denmark,and these danes opened up with an MG42,we all stopped looked at each other and said "what the f**k!!!!".

Definatly has it's own destictive sound...
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#14
Like cotton sheets ripping. If they had prepared properly they would have had more ammo belts linked together. I have seen this before and I kept thinking that the fire support team was caught off gaurd and hadnt wanted all its link laid out in case they had to pack it away after. Those cardboard ammo boxes look ok to rip open in an emergency but pants to refill after!
 
#15
HE117 said:
Living in BaconLand, have you ever had a shot of a Masden LMG ? Played with one, but never had the opportunity to fire it. The concept of a machine gun with a hinged breech is a bit odd...
Unfortunately not. I wouldn't mind giving it a go though. I've only been in ten years, and the Madsen went out in the 60's (or thereabouts).

Scandinavian weapons are a bit quirky sometimes but seem to be of decent quality generally.

If I can get the cash together I'd like to get hold of a M1889 Krag-Jørgensen.


We've got one hanging on the wall in the mess, but I think they might notice if it went missing!
 
#16
Hey, Tartan_T! Knock up a full-size colour piccie and hang it on the wall. Maybe they won't notice. That's a lovely piece they have there, by the way.

On the video: they had some serious firepower going ROT there! Also very nifty reloading drills on display. You've got to hand it to the Scandinavians in general; when the brown and smelly drops into the rotating ventilation device, they really keep their cool and don't fück around. Highly impressive.

MsG
 
#17
HE117 said:
It does illustrate the cyclic rate of the MG42/MG3 though. The gunner was spending more of his time loading than firing...

Ok if you have got a big truck to carry ammo around in and bolt the bl**dy thing to , but was always a bit excessive in the light role. Holding one of these down on a bipod is a wild ride!

Also you go through barrels like no tomorrow. The MG42 was the main reason the Germans developed the swaged rifling method. It allows you to make barrels quickly out of crappy steel...

I still think the MAG/GPMG has the edge in the light role..
I think there's a lot to be said for disintegrating link. Isn't the MAG (our GPMG L7A2) based on the MG42 feed mechanism?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#18
Yes and there were versions of the MG3 made for disintegrating link if I recall!
Sorry thinking about it, it should read that disintegrating link is supposed to work in the MG3 unless anyone here knows different! I think its a STANAG!
 
#19
ugly said:
Yes and there were versions of the MG3 made for disintegrating link if I recall!
Sorry thinking about it, it should read that disintegrating link is supposed to work in the MG3 unless anyone here knows different! I think its a STANAG!
Link M13 according to the box I got through at the weekend. If that's the case, does GPMG work with those fixed belts the Danes had? I imagine it might well do...
 

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