*IMPORTANT* Chilcot Iraq Inquiry Evidence Veterans Roadshow

#1
Welcome, if low key, announcement. Chance for serving and ex-serving to make their views known. I suggest some prior preparation beforehand, perhaps getting thoughts and points down on paper, sorry if that seems stating the obvious. I am sure there are others on this site who can give clearer advice on preparing a written submission. There are other issues - anonymity, the Official Secrets Act, risk of defamation/libel/slander (IANAL!) and hopefully these will be covered in the (as yet unreleased) letter from Chilcot.

Veterans and other participants in the UK involvement in Iraq are being asked for their input to the official inquiry into the conflict.

On 15 June 2009 the Prime Minister announced in Parliament that there would be an inquiry to examine and report on the British Government's policies and their implementation, from summer 2001 to 31 July 2009, relating to the Iraq conflict and its aftermath.

Chairman of the Iraq Inquiry, Sir John Chilcot, has today sent an open letter to participants in the Iraq campaign (Operation TELIC) offering them the opportunity to give their views to the inquiry committee by attending one of a series of roadshows.

In the letter Sir John Chilcot says:

"At the launch of the Iraq Inquiry on 30 July I said that one of the committee's first priorities was to hear from those affected by the Iraq conflict since 2003, including those who served in Iraq as part of Op TELIC.

"We have been pleased that some of you have already contacted the inquiry to let us know what you believe its priorities should be. This is to inform you that the committee will shortly be holding a series of open events across the country for TELIC veterans to participate in if they wish.

"The events will take place as follows:

Wednesday 14 October
Novotel St Pancras,
100-110 Euston Road, London NW1 2AJ
Between 1500 and 1700hrs

Friday 16 October
City Inn Hotel,
1 Auburn Street, 1 Piccadilly Place, Manchester M1 3DG
Between 1500 and 1700hrs

Friday 23 October
City Inn Hotel,
Temple Way, Bristol BS1 6BF
Between 1500 and 1700hrs


"There will also be events in Scotland and Northern Ireland, the details of which will be released shortly.

"I should emphasise that these events are by no means the only opportunity to give your views to the inquiry. We are happy to receive the thoughts of individuals who served during the campaign or from relevant groups or associations on behalf of their members. Please send any submissions to the Iraq Inquiry Secretariat [at the above address].

"The committee are grateful for your help in this aspect of the inquiry's work and look forward to receiving your views in person or in writing."

Should you wish to attend one of the events, please email the Inquiry Secretariat at secretariat@iraqinquiry.org.uk with your name and the event you plan to attend so that they have an idea of numbers. It would also help them to know your role in the campaign, eg, Service, Reservist, civilian, etc.

The Ministry of Defence is co-operating fully with the inquiry. Serving Armed Forces and MOD personnel who wish to attend the roadshows are encouraged to do so.
http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/D...licVeteransInvitedToTakePartInIraqInquiry.htm

It's not on the main Iraq Inquiry website yet.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Does anyone else feel that this might have made a difference and been a worthwhile use of resources in 2003/4 but is a waste of time now? Most of the major players have moved on, their skulduggery and scumbaggery is widely acknowledged and the POR's submitted at the time remain generally ignored.

Much as I'd love to see St Tony squirming, is it an indulgence under the present circumstances? More to the point, wouldn't a similar enquiry into operations in Afghanistan be a better use of time and resources and deliver more immediately valuable results?
 
#3
The main point of this is that the outcome of the inquiry will be seen as the final verdict on the Iraq War. There is unlikely to be a chance afterwards. If anyone has anything to say, now is the time to say it.

What might it change?

- use of intelligence as propaganda
- checks on prerogative powers on "declaring war"
- responsibility for supply issues and equipment shortages/failings

etc...
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
MrPVRd said:
The main point of this is that the outcome of the inquiry will be seen as the final verdict on the Iraq War. There is unlikely to be a chance afterwards. If anyone has anything to say, now is the time to say it.

What might it change?

- use of intelligence as propaganda
- checks on prerogative powers on "declaring war"
- responsibility for supply issues and equipment shortages/failings

etc...
After the experiences of the past twelve years, particularly Hutton, I doubt if anyone accepts an official enquiry as the last word on anything anymore. As to your other deliverables, the use of intelligence as propaganda was an established 'no no' but they did it anyway, checks on prerogative powers are a US device and not applicable to our Parliamentary system and as for the screw up in logistics, well, that's old news. A combination of political cowardice, professional cowardice from the high command and general loggie cr@p in theatre did for us on that score.

My other questions still stand too - is this a good use of resources and would this do more good if it focussed on Afghanistan?
 
#5
Agree about Afghanistan.....maybe the future Lord Dannatt will establish one. It's ridiculous that the Iraq inquiry has taken so long, it was never going to happen under Blair and Brown only did it to avoid awkward questions at the election.

Bet they won't spend as much money as in the Bloody Sunday inquiry (and I bet the lawyers will be disappointed!)

The risk is, that if no-one takes the opportunity to have their say, it will be a one-sided narrative. It may not be the best inquiry at the best time, but it is the inquiry we have and it is the one we'll be left with when it winds up.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top