Immediate pension, how do people react?

Fake Sheikh

War Hero
I'm looking to retire at 85, possibly earlier if I bump the rest of the family off & get away with it.

Dad retired at 57 after 30 years of working 06:00 to 20:00 in the City.
Aunt retired at 51 as the Council offered her a silly offer to go so they could promote others through the CoC.
Sister just retired at 55, small pension but married to a retired Civil Service PUS so quids in.

I have a small military & civil service pension's but hope to retire at 65.
Knees are knackered already so may be do the "in thing" & go on the sicky in 10-15 years or so.
 

Boris_Johnson

ADC
Moderator
DirtyBAT
I'm looking to retire at 85, possibly earlier if I bump the rest of the family off & get away with it.
Well if you get bored by your 86th, the way the British Army is going, you'll be able to probably join back up?

Whether or not you'll be able to retain your Lance Jack from the 1980s and get married quarters for you and your brand new 18 year old Thai bride who married you purely for your looks and personality

....but on the plus side you'll have just over 2 hours to complete your PFA / BFT (whatever it is these day) mile / mile and a half.
 
He didn't say it in so many words, and I can't prove it, but I'm fairly convinced my boss recommended a shit pay rise this year due to him knowing that with my pension I have more take home than him. The cunt.

Like has been stated above, I have knackered pretty much everything, knees, hips,back, hearing - and have spent an awful lot of time in some true shit holes, so fuck them - I earned it.
 

Fake Sheikh

War Hero
Well if you get bored by your 86th, the way the British Army is going, you'll be able to probably join back up?

Whether or not you'll be able to retain your Lance Jack from the 1980s and get married quarters for you and your brand new 18 year old Thai bride who married you purely for your looks and personality

....but on the plus side you'll have just over 2 hours to complete your PFA / BFT (whatever it is these day) mile / mile and a half.
A most excellent reply, Sir.

I was hoping for a Swedish blonde with a big chest to show off on the patch.
But hey if they offer me at least 7 years plus my stripe might consider it.
Dads Army here I go.
 
Tell the teacher that most soldiers only get a pension when they hit 60, but there's a special deal whereby for every baby you murder the pension point is earlier by one month.
not to mention the jackpot prize if you commit a war crime and get away without being prosecuted. Tell 'em it's like a race horse accumulator where if all your war crimes go unnoticed it adds up to a bumper payout. For added outrage points, you want to throw in the little nugget about learning from other's past mistakes and that if you are going to get away with a fair amount of rape and pillage it's best to do it where stirring your porridge in an imba village won't lead to a small group of fairer skinned, rounder eyed kids.

Oh, and it's best to keep an un-registered 7.62 weapon that fires AP rounds, because everyone knows that the British Army issues 5.56 ball as standard and that sh1t is difficult to argue away.

The other one I use is that with "yuman rites" the Geneva Convention and Extinction Rebellion and all, PoWs are expensive and the taxman doesn't thank you for having to provide 2 blankest and 3 square Vegan salads a day when a few gramms of lead and brass is a far more cost effective solution. A wink and a tap of the nose and you teacher mate should run shrieking to twitter.
 
I got my Army Pension straight away after 20+ years then got a civvy job. My salary from the civvy job, plus my Army Pension combined was way more than what the bosses were earning, and I'd paid off my mortgage. So squids in.

I used to tell them just to watch them squirm and be jealous as fcuk.

We earned it, they never, so fill your boots.

What he said, I got my army pension about 6 years before I retired totally, and was earning, if that's the correct word, more than the site manager. The lump sum paid for a few extras, like a new kitchen for the Doris, and when my state and private ones kicked in, well, money to spare, as I had paid off the mortgage years before. I worked blood hard for my corn, and now, we are reaping the benefits. Its nice not having to ask the price of luxury items.

It a great pity that ordinary blokes have to wait until their hair is white before they can sleep in the knowledge that their money worries are over....If you've got it, flaunt it!.......... and as the man says...fcuk em!
 
I left the forces after a good 22+ years and was thus lucky enough to receive an immediate pension. So a question to those similarly favoured.

How do people react when they find out/realise?
A serious reply - the notion that all ex-forces are stellar managers/employees is as inaccurate as saying all millenials are workshy snowlfakes. In my experience ex-foces who have been in long enough to show grit, determination, resilience, and initiative make great people to have working for you, but the certainty of a cast-iron pension that pays the bills can be seriously corrosive. I have had a manager in his late 40s who was a 22 yr SSgt and came out with a pension and played the game of keeping people happy, telling them what they wanted to hear, but who was an utter jack cnut when it came to doing his actual job because he didn't give a sh1t about anything that actually mattered. Without boring anyone with the detail, he was actually fukcing dangerous because he was a serious accident away from putting someone in hospital his lack of detail and control was so slack. When confronted with the evidence of his non-effort he tried the employment tribunal shake-down when he was dismissed.

Had he actually had to worry about paying the bills by keeping his job rather than just seeing it as a time filler until something else came along to do with himself he probably would have had less of a chip on his shoulder and put at least minimal effort into actually doing his job.

And don't get me started on fucking "RO" jobsworth cnuts. 'Makes me glad I'm nowhere near the MoD.
 

CanteenCowboy

LE
Book Reviewer
At my last place of work I made it a running joke that I was already a pensioner, although upon a change of manager the new one took it seriously and questioned my age. Most of my colleagues, who ranged from teenagers to actual real pensioners, didn’t care about it, but one who’d left the military (actually the RAF, but close enough) during Options for Change, was slightly jealous.
 
Speak for yourself mate. I’m loving it - never been busier.
Too true. Did take some getting used to at first but getting up when you want, going to bed when you want, doing the things that need doing (or finding things that didn't really need doing but what the heck) when you want is brill.
My immediate pension (God, over 20 years ago) gave me a £100 a week plus the commutation paid of the mortgage giving me a virtual pay rise of an extra 250 quid a month.

All the things I used to pay people for, like painting, maintaining the garden and trees and so on, I now do myself when I think it needs doing. None of the once weekly shop and piling the trolley up to overflowing. Go and get what we want, when we need it and having tons less of waste stuff which we used to throw away.

Fancy a long weekend in Milan? Pop on a plane and get over there. Fancy a couple of days in Valencia? Hop on the bus as it's cheaper than parking and stay where you want. No planning, no working out holiday rotas or waiting for the expensive bank holiday periods.

But tell people about that? Not really, not when I was working, anyhow. Occasionally mention it nowadays if asked. Especially to those who thought the state pension was all they'd need and wouldn't have to take out another pension.
Luckily, the Army payed mine for me and the NHS (I worked for them for 14 years after leaving the Army) had the same pension scheme but with contributions. Well worth it. The immediate pension and lump sum was the icing on the cake, though. And the rather large rise at aged 55 was the cherry on top.
 
What he said, I got my army pension about 6 years before I retired totally, and was earning, if that's the correct word, more than the site manager. The lump sum paid for a few extras, like a new kitchen for the Doris, and when my state and private ones kicked in, well, money to spare, as I had paid off the mortgage years before. I worked blood hard for my corn, and now, we are reaping the benefits. Its nice not having to ask the price of luxury items.

It a great pity that ordinary blokes have to wait until their hair is white before they can sleep in the knowledge that their money worries are over....If you've got it, flaunt it!.......... and as the man says...fcuk em!
When your state pension kicked in was it reduced because you had an Army Pension and a Private Pension? Or was your Army Pension reduced because you started receiving a State Pension?

I've got three Pensions and I have no idea what will happen when I reach State Pensionable age.

Cheers
 
A serious reply - the notion that all ex-forces are stellar managers/employees is as inaccurate as saying all millenials are workshy snowlfakes. In my experience ex-foces who have been in long enough to show grit, determination, resilience, and initiative make great people to have working for you, but the certainty of a cast-iron pension that pays the bills can be seriously corrosive. I have had a manager in his late 40s who was a 22 yr SSgt and came out with a pension and played the game of keeping people happy, telling them what they wanted to hear, but who was an utter jack cnut when it came to doing his actual job because he didn't give a sh1t about anything that actually mattered. Without boring anyone with the detail, he was actually fukcing dangerous because he was a serious accident away from putting someone in hospital his lack of detail and control was so slack. When confronted with the evidence of his non-effort he tried the employment tribunal shake-down when he was dismissed.

Had he actually had to worry about paying the bills by keeping his job rather than just seeing it as a time filler until something else came along to do with himself he probably would have had less of a chip on his shoulder and put at least minimal effort into actually doing his job.

And don't get me started on ******* "RO" jobsworth cnuts. 'Makes me glad I'm nowhere near the MoD.
I did the exact opposite, left the Army after 24 years, started my first job and applied myself to the job exactly as I would have had I still been in. I learned quick, got the job done quick, organised and strategised, solved problems, not created them, applied the rules to the letter, got promoted quick, and managed people in a very disciplined but fair way.

To this day, I cant explain why but I felt as if I was still in the Army, just doing a different job.

Still do now I have retired, just feels like I am on leave. :salut: :boogie:
 
When your state pension kicked in was it reduced because you had an Army Pension and a Private Pension? Or was your Army Pension reduced because you started receiving a State Pension?

I've got three Pensions and I have no idea what will happen when I reach State Pensionable age.

Cheers
Your Army pension won't be reduced but the other pensions (including the state one) are taken into account when assessing you tax level so you could end up (like me) paying more tax on your Army pension.
Your state pension isn't reduced and that they pay that tax free but does count towards your tax band.

My Army pension, which I declare as my main income, has the state pension taken into account with my tax code and my other pension is taxed at BR.
 

anglo

LE
When your state pension kicked in was it reduced because you had an Army Pension and a Private Pension? Or was your Army Pension reduced because you started receiving a State Pension?

I've got three Pensions and I have no idea what will happen when I reach State Pensionable age.

Cheers
You get your full state pension entitlement, no deductions except it's taxable, if
all your incomings exceed your tax allowance
 
people arent surprised at your pension entitlement, they're astonished that the decrepit old codger before them is in his early 40's
 
I'm looking forward to the end of April when I hit 55 and after 7 years of fixed pension, 'the rest' kicks in. I'm not sure what the new figure will be but I'm sure the agency will tell me in good time. I don't think it will be quite enough to fully retire on but it will certainly make life a little more comfortable - even if pushing me slightly closer to top tax bracket as the work increments increase.
 
waiting to see how the FBU pension ruling effects my CS pension, and remeber that you may well not get the full whack of state pension, imho anyone thats done 22 or over deserves the pension simply for being ****ed over for that long
 
When your state pension kicked in was it reduced because you had an Army Pension and a Private Pension? Or was your Army Pension reduced because you started receiving a State Pension?

I've got three Pensions and I have no idea what will happen when I reach State Pensionable age.

Cheers

I got, and still get the full amount, of all three, state, army and private, and as the total amount itakes me just over the threshold of my allowances, I pay tax on the difference, stopped at source. last year I got a tax rebate of £18.30p. I got my army pension in 2010, when I was 60, which included a lump sum payment, tax free the total of 3 years payments. my private pension I claimed when I was 63, and my state when I was 65.5. The army & state pensions rise annually in line with inflation. I do not know if the same criteria apply today.
 
It's none of their business, they should have done 22+ years in the army instead of a teaching degree if they wanted a pension at 40. On the other hand, they probably have functioning knees, good hearing and a healthy liver. There is a reason why soldiers have to retire early.
Err, shoulders, hips and back?
 

anglo

LE
I got, and still get the full amount, of all three, state, army and private, and as the total amount itakes me just over the threshold of my allowances, I pay tax on the difference, stopped at source. last year I got a tax rebate of £18.30p. I got my army pension in 2010, when I was 60, which included a lump sum payment, tax free the total of 3 years payments. my private pension I claimed when I was 63, and my state when I was 65.5. The army & state pensions rise annually in line with inflation. I do not know if the same criteria apply today.
I claim a part of my Mrs tax allowance as her pension doesn't use it all,
 

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