Immediate pension, how do people react?

I left the forces after a good 22+ years and was thus lucky enough to receive an immediate pension. So a question to those similarly favoured.

How do people react when they find out/realise?

I've had people suggesting I'm 'cashing in a little early' in life, not realising I can't not take the pension...

Some people seem pretty positive whilst others seem quite upset about the whole thing. I had a teacher recently asking me how old I was and getting quite perplexed that I was in my middish 40s and picking up four figures a month. He asked and didn't seem to want to let it go.

Anyone else?
 
Given that the British generally consider the topic of how much one earns/has coming in not something it is polite to discuss, I have found that most people are not bothered and if it crops up I refer to having 'a little bit for a few extras, but nt enough to retire just yet' which actually is about right.
 

Boris_Johnson

ADC
Moderator
DirtyBAT
I left the forces after a good 22+ years and was thus lucky enough to receive an immediate pension. So a question to those similarly favoured.

How do people react when they find out/realise?

I've had people suggesting I'm 'cashing in a little early' in life, not realising I can't not take the pension...

Some people seem pretty positive whilst others seem quite upset about the whole thing. I had a teacher recently asking me how old I was and getting quite perplexed that I was in my middish 40s and picking up four figures a month. He asked and didn't seem to want to let it go.

Anyone else?
One thing I've learned so far in Civvy St...

Don't talk about pay, pensions or anything related to it.

Ever.

I keep my mouth shut. I'm getting what I'm supposed to from the right places, that's all that matters.
 
With all the above, for sure, and dont mention it. Take what you've got, pay off any long term debts, mortgages, etc. Live within those new means. Five index-linked years later, you cant believe where you are with money to spend each month. "Another holiday this month, or pay someone to paint the hall, stairs & landing dear?"
 
I got my Army Pension straight away after 20+ years then got a civvy job. My salary from the civvy job, plus my Army Pension combined was way more than what the bosses were earning, and I'd paid off my mortgage. So squids in.

I used to tell them just to watch them squirm and be jealous as fcuk.

We earned it, they never, so fill your boots.
 

Toppet

War Hero
I got my Army Pension straight away after 20+ years then got a civvy job. My salary from the civvy job, plus my Army Pension combined was way more than what the bosses were earning, and I'd paid off my mortgage. So squids in.

I used to tell them just to watch them squirm and be jealous as fcuk.

We earned it, they never, so fill your boots.
I'm glad that I only have to wait another 20 years before my AFPS05 hits the bank account.

Oh, bugger.
 
"What do you do for a living?"
"I'm retired, I'm a house husband now"
"Oh really?! How old are you, if you don't mind me asking?"
"I'm 40"
"Wow, I wish I was able to retire"
Well, I certainly earned it after 23 years in service
 
I'm jealous as fook, if that helps?
My career was The Army. Everything I did after that was just filling in the time between leaving the Forces and retirement. Still got a few years to push before State Pension starts.

If it helps, retirement is not all its cracked up to be. It takes a while to get used to not having to be at work on time and shit like that.
 
Given that the British generally consider the topic of how much one earns/has coming in not something it is polite to discuss, I have found that most people are not bothered and if it crops up I refer to having 'a little bit for a few extras, but nt enough to retire just yet' which actually is about right.
I always feel awkward but it's mainly close friends and family thinking I'm cashing in early.

The teacher was someone who knew of the immediate pension and wasn't going to let it go.
 
The way it is in the US most people tend to work until they drop, fact of life with having to pay for decent medical insurance, or keep working so that an employer pays it for you. They do not have the same pension plan type investments as are available in the UK. If they have served a full career in the US military then they are lucky in what you receive and it nicely adds to the US state pension when they finally receive that too.

We have totted up our UK pensions as they are all starting to slowly become visible on the horizon and it is quite impressive and should not see me starve in old age. I quite enjoy telling people I receive a pension here and you can see it blow their minds when they look at me and my age. Last year when I was buying my new motorcycle the bloke was busily trying to sell me a credit agreement and I happily told him that I don't need to borrow money and that this particular toy was from my pension lump sum payout. The monthly payout goes into my UK account and is paying off the NI stamp so that I qualify for a UK state pension too in due course.
 
but it's mainly close friends and family thinking I'm cashing in early.
Bloody hell that's rough mate. Ask them where they were, when you were in a hole in the ground in a shite hole on the other side of the world.

And tell them from me, they're a bunchy of cheeky carnts!
 

Dread

LE
I always feel awkward but it's mainly close friends and family thinking I'm cashing in early.

The teacher was someone who knew of the immediate pension and wasn't going to let it go.
Tell the teacher that most soldiers only get a pension when they hit 60, but there's a special deal whereby for every baby you murder the pension point is earlier by one month.
 
I was quite happy doing fack all apart from the school run and the housework, until She decided that She wanted a kitchen extension, now I'm at work again. 3 lovely years off. Jokes on Her, I've been spending my new extra money on shooting, guns and nonsense I don't need. Fxxk her!
 
I left the forces after a good 22+ years and was thus lucky enough to receive an immediate pension. So a question to those similarly favoured.

How do people react when they find out/realise?

I've had people suggesting I'm 'cashing in a little early' in life, not realising I can't not take the pension...

Some people seem pretty positive whilst others seem quite upset about the whole thing. I had a teacher recently asking me how old I was and getting quite perplexed that I was in my middish 40s and picking up four figures a month. He asked and didn't seem to want to let it go.

Anyone else?
It's none of their business, they should have done 22+ years in the army instead of a teaching degree if they wanted a pension at 40. On the other hand, they probably have functioning knees, good hearing and a healthy liver. There is a reason why soldiers have to retire early.
 

Tyk

LE
I left the forces after a good 22+ years and was thus lucky enough to receive an immediate pension. So a question to those similarly favoured.

How do people react when they find out/realise?

I've had people suggesting I'm 'cashing in a little early' in life, not realising I can't not take the pension...

Some people seem pretty positive whilst others seem quite upset about the whole thing. I had a teacher recently asking me how old I was and getting quite perplexed that I was in my middish 40s and picking up four figures a month. He asked and didn't seem to want to let it go.

Anyone else?
I've had loads of people on my teams drawing their military pensions and my attitude has always been they worked a damn sight more than 8 hour days 5 days a week for 20+ years so they more than earned it. I guess that people who're less familiar with mil types may find it a bit wonky, but there are others that get pensions early like Firemen or people that can take early retirement on chunky pensions like teachers (4 of my uncles/aunts did) and then work in other fields.
 

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