Imber Village - Pre 1980s

Heartbreaklane

War Hero
Was there in the late 80s, hard to remember now. Arrived at O'Dark hundred, egg banjos and hot brews all round, I do remember that as it was fuckin freezing and they were much welcome. Remember doing the 'confidence course' (I think it wea called?), slippery as feck. with all the ice about the place. Then a few days of fighting in someone else's house.
 
Being based In Tidders or in other southern Bks, e.g Dover, we used Imber a fair bit.....think I must have been there maybe 20 times over my years service from when it was pretty basic in the 70's up until the late 90's when they had spent £'s on it building a sewer system, confidence courses, etc. .

For my last Ex there, ..Jeez...maybe '99.. I was in charge of the BATSIMS working alongside the Training Team ...

My best thoughts on Imber involve the totally untrue stories of how the previous residents spent their time doing nothing but drinking Badger juice and taking part in depraved ,mass Incestuous orgies that produce weird looking and deformed children . ...oh, and the human sacrifices of kidnapped 'Outsiders' held on the alter of the church, which was the reason why it's still keep locked as it's seen as a shrine by an insane death cult who try to break in and reenact this most weeks

...that's why as a young squaddie you should never walk about on your own while there. as there are eyes watching, always watching and waiting ......



C*nts :)
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
First trained there in 1976 and 78 (OTC summer camps). Then again in 1979 (Pl Comd's course). Often in the early 80s (stationed in Bulford). The last time was 1995 (acting as OPFOR for the Sch of Inf).
 
I did something similar around about 1972, but because I'd prayed to the God of Para beforehand, was only treated to a traffic-guidance stake on the ground, which met my knee at a religiously-inspired angle. Howled, I did.
OOF ! I bet that was a serious 2 Brufen job. Respect to the 16 Para Brigade old school , we all had a copy of "They stood in the door" - Dennisons & proper helmets .
 

cuchulain

Old-Salt
I seem to have spent quite a bit of time there in the early 80s when I picked up this little gem. It has 20 odd pages about Imber including a dozen photos and a pre-1943 map of the village. It also explains that the people of Imber were known as 'Bungeys' which apparently came from a dog of the same name owned by a local farmer. When the dog died, the farmer skinned it and dried the skin. In summer he used it to store surplus butter and hung it up in the kitchen. In winter when the fires were lit the butter bgan to drip and the children used to stand underneath reciting: "Drop on my bread, Bungey". The lane leading south from Imber, now known as "American Road", was called Bungey's Lane.
 

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I seem to have spent quite a bit of time there in the early 80s when I picked up this little gem. It has 20 odd pages about Imber including a dozen photos and a pre-1943 map of the village. It also explains that the people of Imber were known as 'Bungeys' which apparently came from a dog of the same name owned by a local farmer. When the dog died, the farmer skinned it and dried the skin. In summer he used it to store surplus butter and hung it up in the kitchen. In winter when the fires were lit the butter bgan to drip and the children used to stand underneath reciting: "Drop on my bread, Bungey". The lane leading south from Imber, now known as "American Road", was called Bungey's Lane.
Very interested in a full scan please!
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Outstanding! Thank you - will have a go at stitching all together in a PDF and posting back here.

If you do get round to scanning the rest if the booklet, I can add those in later easily
Version 1
Doesn't have pages 1-13 & 26-29
It's been reduced in size for upload, not too much loss of clarity
 

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