Iffy?

Discussion in 'Jobs (Discussion)' started by _spawn_, Mar 4, 2011.

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  1. Can anyone help me with this? I have been spammed with recruiting someone for our little operation and have been handed this certificate by an applicant.

    It was offered as proof with a promise to return with the original copy next week.

    I am confused though, the type set looks all wrong and shouldnt 'certificate' have a capital 'C'?

    Yes, he is Nigerian and I have rubbered out a few details but any takers?

    (sorry about the quality!)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. I cant read that properly, but "naturalisation" in that context should have a upper case N.

    I wouldnt touch him with a shiity stick.

    but then you know that dont you ?
     
  3. To be fair no I don't, not had much dealing with this kind of thing but I'm comfortably secure I the knowledge that all is not as it seems :)
     
  4. It is difficult to see it in any detail but the n at the start of naturalisation should be capitalised so on that alone, it's not a genuine letter. People were getting issued with plastic ID cards that stated their legal status and whether they were allowed to work ect. I don't know if they got binned with the rest of the ID card project. Isn't the fine about 10 grand if an illegal is caught working for you? I wouldn't employ the bloke unless you can get it authenticated by the Home Office authorities.
     
  5. if you were happy, you wouldnt be asking questions on here.
    Trust your feelings Luke, use the force !! :)
     
  6. Read this.

    and this

    Do not, under any circumstances, turn down this applicant purely because you think that his certificate is a bit iffy, unless you want your employer to have to pay this man a vast sum of money in order for him to go away.
     
  7. maguire

    maguire LE Book Reviewer

    is there no easy way of checking with the Home Office?

    'yes, we gave john smith of bunga-bunga land permission to work last year. here's a letter to confirm it.'

    ...or is that just far too easy and sensible??
     
  8. You should be in possession of document copies that you can refer to if ever in doubt contact the immigration dept as they will advise you.
     
  9. Hope this helps

    As an employer, you have a duty to prevent illegal working. It is a civil offence under the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 (punishable by a fine of up to £10,000 per employee) to employ a person who is subject to immigration control unless:
    •
    That person has been given valid and subsisting leave to be in the UK by the Government, and that leave does not restrict them from working;
    •
    The person comes into a category where employment is allowed.
    If you knowingly employ an illegal migrant it is a criminal offence and could result in imprisonment for up to 2 years and/or an unlimited fine.
    Ensuring that new employees are eligible to work in the UK
    You must follow steps 1-3 for every new employee. By doing this you will ensure that your recruitment practices comply with the requirements for establishing eligibility to work in the UK and you will not be liable for payment of a civil penalty for employing a person illegally. You should carry out these steps before the individual starts working for your company – otherwise an offence may be committed if the individual is not eligible to work in the UK.
    Step 1
    You must ask all potential employees to provide:
    •
    One of the original documents alone, or two of the original documents in the specified combinations listed in Appendix 1; or
    •
    One of the original documents alone, or two of the original documents in the specified combinations listed in Appendix 2.
    Step 2
    You must satisfy yourself that the potential employee is the rightful holder of any of the documents they present to you.
    You must carry out the following reasonable steps when checking any documents presented to you:
    ��
    Check any photographs, where available, to ensure that you are satisfied they are consistent with the appearance of the potential employee
    ��
    Check the dates of birth listed so that you are satisfied these are consistent with the appearance of the potential employee
    ��
    Check that the expiry dates of any limited leave to enter or remain in the UK have not passed
    2
    ��
    Check any UK Government stamps or endorsements to see if the prospective or current employee is able to do the type of work you are offering
    ��
    Satisfy yourself that the documents are genuine and have not been tampered with and belong to the holder
    ��
    If the potential employee gives you 2 documents from Appendix 2 that have different names, you should ask for a further document to explain this – e.g. marriage certificate, divorce document, adoption certificate, deed poll or statutory declaration.
    Step 3
    Make a copy of the relevant page or pages of the document, in a format which can not be subsequently altered, for example, a photocopy or scan (using Write Once Read Many software). In the case of a passport or other travel document, the following parts must be photocopied or scanned:
    ��
    For identity cards, passports and travel documents, a copy should be taken of the document’s front cover and any page containing the holder’s personal details. In particular you should copy any page that provides details of nationality, his or her photograph, date of birth, signature, date of expiry or biometric details; and
    ��
    Any page containing UK Government immigration endorsements, noting the date of expiry and any relevant UK immigration endorsement which allows the prospective or current employee to do the type of work you are offering.
    Other documents should be copied in their entirety.
    You should then keep a record of every document you have copied. The copies of the documents should be kept securely for the duration of the individual’s employment and for a further two years after their employment has ceased.
    On each occasion that a follow-up document check is undertaken, you should repeat the specified steps given above within the given time period and record the date of each subsequent check that has been carried out. If you retain an employee with an Appendix B document or documents and have not made the follow-up checks required in order to retain proof of eligibility to work in the UK (such follow-up checks must be undertaken at least once every 12 months) then Serco may be liable for payment of a civil penalty if that person is found to be working illegally in the UK.
    Employers who acquire staff as a result of a Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) transfer are provided with a grace period of 28 days to undertake the appropriate document checks following the date of transfer.
    If you have carried out all these checks and establish that the potential employee is not permitted to work, or is not the rightful holder of the document presented, then you are entitled to refuse employment to that person. In these circumstances you may also want to contact the UK Border Agency Employer’s helpline on 0845 010 6677 for further advice.


    Appendix 1
    Documents which provide ongoing proof of eligibility to work in the UK
    1. A passport showing that the holder, or a person named in the passport as the child of the holder, is a British citizen or a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies having the right of abode in the United Kingdom.
    2. A passport or national identity card showing that the holder, or a person named in the passport as the child of the holder, is a national of the European Economic Area or Switzerland.
    3. A residence permit, registration certificate or document certifying or indicating permanent residence issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland.
    4. A permanent residence card issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the family member of a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland.
    5. A Biometric Immigration Document issued by the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder which indicates that the person named in it is allowed to stay indefinitely in the United Kingdom, or has no time limit on their stay in the United Kingdom.
    6. A passport or other travel document endorsed to show that the holder is exempt from immigration control, is allowed to stay indefinitely in the United Kingdom, has the right of abode in the United Kingdom, or has no time limit on their stay in the United Kingdom.
    7. An Immigration Status Document issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder with an endorsement indicating that the person named in it is allowed to stay indefinitely in the United Kingdom or has no time limit on their stay in the United Kingdom, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer (e.g. P45, P60, National Insurance card).
    8. A full birth certificate issued in the United Kingdom which includes the name(s) of at least one of the holder’s parents, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    9. A full adoption certificate issued in the United Kingdom which includes the name(s) of at least one of the holder’s adoptive parents when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    10. A birth certificate issued in the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man or Ireland, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    11. An adoption certificate issued in the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man or Ireland, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    12. A certificate of registration or naturalisation as a British citizen, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    13. A letter issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder which indicates that the person named in it is allowed to stay indefinitely in the United Kingdom or has no time limit on their stay when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.


    Appendix 2
    Documents which provide proof of eligibility to work in the UK for up to 12 months
    1. A passport or travel document endorsed to show that the holder is allowed to stay in the United Kingdom and is allowed to do the type of work in question, provided that it does not require the issue of a work permit.
    2. A Biometric Immigration Document issued by the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder which indicates that the person named in it can stay in the United Kingdom and is allowed to do the work in question.
    3. A work permit or other approval to take employment issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency when produced in combination with either a passport or another travel document endorsed to show the holder is allowed to stay in the United Kingdom and is allowed to do the work in question, or a letter issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder or the employer or prospective employer confirming the same.
    4. A certificate of application issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to or for a family member of a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland stating that the holder is permitted to take employment which is less than 6 months old when produced in combination with evidence of verification by the Border and Immigration Agency Employer Checking Service.
    5. A residence card or document issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to a family member of a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland.
    6. An Application Registration Card issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency stating that the holder is permitted to take employment, when produced in combination with evidence of verification by the Border and Immigration Agency Employer Checking Service.
    7. An Immigration Status Document issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder with an endorsement indicating that the person named in it can stay in the United Kingdom, and is allowed to do the type of work in question, when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
    8. A letter issued by the Home Office or the Border and Immigration Agency to the holder or the employer or prospective employer, which indicates that the person named in it can stay in the United Kingdom and is allowed to do the work in question when produced in combination with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance Number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer
     
  10. Don't hire him on the basis that Nigerians are inherently bone-idle, and lazy.
     
  11. Surely if the certificate is [apparently] issued by the Home Office, they'd be the sensible people to ask re whether it's real or not?
     
  12. Is this him?

    [/QUOTE]
     
  13. Don't bother asking the HO - they are obviously bored with being asked so they put specimens on their advisory web-site to guide folks. This is what it should look like:

    [​IMG]

    Note it is in fact "Certificate of naturalisation" not Certificate of Naturalisation...this is because it is a title of a document and not text in a Victorian freaking novel!

    The copy you have is black and white but the original is a myriad of fascinating colours - no doubt similar to the attire the applicant showed up for his interview in??

    dited to add: Or is that stereotypical Ghanaians??
     
  14. so where did you copy and paste this from very good and detailed!!!