If you had a choice, what Russian equipment would you use?

No. It was a direct copy of the Russian one with folding bayonet. The sporterised one could take the AK magazine. This was 1995 and you could buy the average SKS for about a hundred dollars and ammunition was for pennies. You could buy surplus rounds in cans for very small money.
A few years ago in Canada Marstar were giving away a free Chinese SKS if you bought a crate of 7.62x39mm ammunition (about 1100 rounds). If I recall, the ammunition was from somewhere in Europe.
 
the only thing wrong with the ammo was that it was considered very corrosive to barrels so the Texans I was with always made a point of cleaning the rifles thoroughly after shooting.
 
I'd really like to try out a Gorka suit top but no justification to splash out on more outerwear at the moment.



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I'd really like to try out a Gorka suit top but no justification to splash out on more outerwear at the moment.



View attachment 487124
They're well worth it. My SPOSN suit jacket gets worn pretty much every day except in high summer.
 
Thinking about the thread, years ago we inherited ( in a land deal) a Belarus sov era tractor with a concrete mixer on the back.
lots of the castings looked crude by Massey F standards but it’s gearbox and hydraulic system was about 15 years ahead of what you could get on med side tractors here. Very sophisticated.
Oh and it allways, and I mean allways started first flick of the key.
They have been well known for tractor manufacture there and the Minsk tractor company has been operating for seventy years and 10% of the worlds tractors came from there, I have seen a sprinkling of them over here for years.
 
No. It was a direct copy of the Russian one with folding bayonet. The sporterised one could take the AK magazine. This was 1995 and you could buy the average SKS for about a hundred dollars and ammunition was for pennies. You could buy surplus rounds in cans for very small money.
I bought an Chicom SKS in 1989 with folding spike bayonet and they threw in 300 rds of pink lacquered cased FMJ, 30 stripper clips and a neat Chest rig for 200 bucks
 
Isn't that because so often all the bells and whistles are Western kit? (QED?)

Rob Lee is good (if hyperactive) for immensely long kit-spotting threads:
I watched a Russian documentary about the Omon troops, who are supposed to be elite types. Turns out that new entrants get the usual standard issue Russian infantry kit handed to recruits in the normal Army,even if they are experienced soldiers and it's only much later do they get issued any of the better kit. Most end up buying Western kit or local knockoffs, if they want to have a chance to stay in the unit, on top of which was the usual delays in getting paid/shit accomodation/getting dicked around on a general basis. It was no wonder that they were finding it hard to get recruits
 

itchy300

Old-Salt
I've got a Russian/English military dictionary somewhere, I'll look out for it for you.

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Kind of you but I was joking, I typed out my wish list and realised it was just a speel of acronyms and only other spotters would know what I mean ^_^
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
A few years ago in Canada Marstar were giving away a free Chinese SKS if you bought a crate of 7.62x39mm ammunition (about 1100 rounds). If I recall, the ammunition was from somewhere in Europe.
Yes the ammo was most cheap but horrendously corrosive requiring much care and attention after a range session
 
Yes the ammo was most cheap but horrendously corrosive requiring much care and attention after a range session
Most or all older mil surplus 7.62x39mm ammunition was made with corrosive primers. There are experts on this site who are more qualified to comment on this than I am, but I believe it had to do with eastern European and Chinese manufacturers stuck with older technology corrosive primers long after they had been phased out in Western countries because they maintained huge war stockpiles and the chemistry of corrosive primers was more stable in long term storage than non-corrosive primers.

I've been told that when it comes to any 7.62x39mm or 7.62x54mm then it's best to assume it is corrosive unless you know otherwise.
 
Most or all older mil surplus 7.62x39mm ammunition was made with corrosive primers. There are experts on this site who are more qualified to comment on this than I am, but I believe it had to do with eastern European and Chinese manufacturers stuck with older technology corrosive primers long after they had been phased out in Western countries because they maintained huge war stockpiles and the chemistry of corrosive primers was more stable in long term storage than non-corrosive primers.

I've been told that when it comes to any 7.62x39mm or 7.62x54mm then it's best to assume it is corrosive unless you know otherwise.
Exactly, back around 2010 I was shooting very cheap 1948 russian surplus x54r with absolutely no problems. It was a shame almost to open the galvanised cans but cheap is cheap.

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TOS-2. Particularly when it comes to teaching social distancing.
 

jmb3296

Old-Salt
I'd really like to try out a Gorka suit top but no justification to splash out on more outerwear at the moment.



View attachment 487124
I got one, well truth be told I made an arse of the online ordering, in Russian, and ended up with four.
Fortunately no 2 son is the same sort of misshapen wretch as me and he now has one, as will my BIL and a farmer friend when lockdown ends.
Good pieces of kit at a very affordable price.
 
I got one, well truth be told I made an arse of the online ordering, in Russian, and ended up with four.
Fortunately no 2 son is the same sort of misshapen wretch as me and he now has one, as will my BIL and a farmer friend when lockdown ends.
Good pieces of kit at a very affordable price.
Can you give us the link for the particular one you ordered?
 

Ritch

LE
Hello all,
Russian equipment has always tended to be on the rugged side of things. If you had to use their kit,what would you use instead of Western kit?
I'd love to try this on the frozen wastelands of Sheffield.

the-sherp-a-russian-all-terrain-vehicle-thats-pretty-much-unstoppable-thumb.jpg


"The Sherp"
 

4(T)

LE
Most or all older mil surplus 7.62x39mm ammunition was made with corrosive primers. There are experts on this site who are more qualified to comment on this than I am, but I believe it had to do with eastern European and Chinese manufacturers stuck with older technology corrosive primers long after they had been phased out in Western countries because they maintained huge war stockpiles and the chemistry of corrosive primers was more stable in long term storage than non-corrosive primers.

I've been told that when it comes to any 7.62x39mm or 7.62x54mm then it's best to assume it is corrosive unless you know otherwise.

The whole "corrosive ammo" thing seems to be a transatlantic phobia. Of course it shouldn't make a difference what the ammo is like, so long as the firearm is cleaned after firing as a matter of routine anyway.

Here in Britain at least, the legacy of past wars seems to be that its always been a common habit - civil or military - to clean any weapon after firing any ammo and, for those bearing a small arm on military service, to pull it through daily. Interestingly, weapon cleaning seems to have been one military institutional behaviour accepted without question by all those civilian soldiers in WW1/2.

Maybe other non Commonwealth nations have different weapon maintenance cultures.


I've got quite a large quantity of x39 and x54R ammo, some in the old 2x sardine cans per crate. Whilst its all shootable, only a small proportion is good quality (ie the heavy 54R, preferably Hungarian or Yugo) and there are so few variations on headstamp and tip/primer colour between the dozens of communist/client factories that its hard to distinguish what is what.
 

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