If you could vote

Your choice for US president

  • Clinton

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Obama

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • McCain

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • None of the above

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
#2
McCain.

He came across quite well on a recent interview conducted whilst he was in Britain.
 
#3
none.

I have a new theory of not voting. as it only seems to encourage having more bloody politicians.
 
#4
McCain.

He microwave chips are fcuking gorgeous!!!!!
 
#5
So far McCain is the only one who doesn't change his opinions/policies after every opinion poll. He is also the only one that I haven't heard any mention of lying about his past.
 
#6
McCain. The Democrats think he's to conservative, conservative Republicans think he is too liberal. Annoying people on either end of the political scale? Must be doing something right to annoy that many people and still get made a candidate.
 
#7
McCain was on TV yesterday getting everything about Iraq completey wrong and looking more senile/stupid than Bush. I respect his service record but he is just too old and being a POW for years doesnt, contrary to popular opinion, does not actually mean he will be a good President.

Obama is a closet racist and has been lying about his agenda all along.

Hilary is what she is. Love her or laoth her at least you will get no surprises.
 
#8
lazystudent said:
McCain. The Democrats think he's to conservative, conservative Republicans think he is too liberal. Annoying people on either end of the political scale? Must be doing something right to annoy that many people and still get made a candidate.
Seconded. Also like the rumour he is planning some kind of "super-Spook" new Intelligence Agency; with any luck it will be based on SHIELD! 8O 8)

Gets my vote! :D
 
#9
Dog-faced-soldier said:
McCain was on TV yesterday getting everything about Iraq completey wrong and looking more senile/stupid than Bush. I respect his service record but he is just too old and being a POW for years doesnt, contrary to popular opinion, does not actually mean he will be a good President.

Obama is a closet racist and has been lying about his agenda all along.

Hilary is what she is. Love her or laoth her at least you will get no surprises.
You are Slick Willie Clinton and I claim my $10! :D
 
#10
Clinton,everyone knows all the skeletons in her closet,what you see is what you get,love her or loathe her! The other good thing about the Clintons,is BOGOF! :wink:
 
#11
Quite frankly whichever of the three wins I will be a bit frightened.

The standard of politician running for the highest office in the USA is now on a level with the poor choices we are offered in the UK.

You can have any flavour you want as long as its shoite!
 
#12
Clinton: evil, moneygrubbing, power hungry bitch. Qualification is being the wife of slick Willy. Doesn't cut it.

Obama: a very inexperienced, junior Senator from Illinois. Attended a black supremacist Church for 20 years and refuses to distance himself properly from the antiwhite, racist opinions he listened to for these 20 years. his entire qualification for the job appears to be that he is half black. His supporters treat him as some kind of Messiah, and there is a distinct cult of personality about him. Doesn't appear to have any policies. If you don't like him you're instantly labelled a racist. This is a great way to alienate the "floating voters" upon whom election depends. A very divisive candidate: he is very left wing (in American terms), and he makes the race nonissue into the main issue.

McCain: Democrats will disagree with me on this, but he is the unifying candidate, being more of a centrist than the other two. Race is not an issue with him (or indeed his party -- despite what the Democrats think.) does actually have some policies, and is consistent.

The Democrats could have had this election in the bag if they hadn't followed the crazies down the 1980s identity politics route. "vote for me I'm a left-wing woman, otherwise you are sexist " and/or " vote for me I'm a left-wing coloured dude, otherwise you are racist" is not a popular position with floating voters.
 
#13
The trouble with McCain is his age and evident senility and the fact that he is really just Bush in disguise. In a country desperate for change, he is offering more of the same.

I do agree that race should be a non-issue and that the Republicans are not inherently racist, sexist or anything else ist apart from capitalist.

If Obama hadnt cropped up when he did, Hilary would have been a shoe in for the job, whether or not she is suitable.
 
#15
McCain.

OK he's got a few batshit crazy Republican views, but he's managed to piss off the religious right and the looney left. That has it in the bag, so far as I'm concerned, even if he hadn't been at the sharp end.

He also seems to have a 'moral vision' of America that's been lacking the last few incumbents. He may be a politician but he does seem to be able to find 'principle' in the dictionary.
 
#18
Clinton?
a slippery liar, just like her husband, but at least you do know what your getting.

Obama?
is relying on his skin colour to consolidate the minority vote, this is typical of a populist type leadership, he will be wishy-washy in charge and will polerise the nation.

McCain?
i honestly have a serious issue about him, his endorsement of 'intelligent design'... that's just creationism in spin. he wants it teached in schools, the last thing the world needs is more religious extremism.
does he himself truly believe in it, or is he just pandering to the back bone of the republican party, the loony religious right?

http://politicalwire.com/archives/2005/08/24/mccain_backs_intelligent_design.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2005/08/24/mccain-comes-out-for-teac_n_6151.html

http://www.alternet.org/story/28266/

also i would like to have the republican party out of office for lying about WMDs, (same reason i want NuLabour out)
another reason is for America to show a new face and a sence of change to the world. it needs it.

so its Clinton. not because shes best for the job.
but because shes the less of the three evils.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
stoatman said:
Obama: Attended a black supremacist Church for 20 years and refuses to distance himself properly from the antiwhite, racist opinions he listened to for these 20 years.
I'm not an Obama fan and like you am amazed at how someone with so few concrete policy ideas can have got so far, but your above comment is in truth, far from accurate. Not only did he denounce Rev Wright's sermon outright, he also made a very good (for a politician) speech in Philly a couple of days back about why he went to that church and listened to Rev Wright.

I also think you're off the mark about him playing the race card. ne of his attractions to his many groupies is that he avoids it. This seems to be a double edged sword though as whist it distances him from the old style African American politicians (Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton et al), it's led to criticism from many black voters who apparently have an affection for the Clintons.

Obama's whole speech can be found here, but I copied the relevant parts below:

Obama said:
The remarks that have caused this recent firestorm weren't simply controversial. They weren't simply a religious leader's effort to speak out against perceived injustice.

Instead, they expressed a profoundly distorted view of this country -- a view that sees white racism as endemic, and that elevates what is wrong with America above all that we know is right with America, a view that sees the conflicts in the Middle East as rooted primarily in the actions of stalwart allies like Israel, instead of emanating from the perverse and hateful ideologies of radical Islam.

Rev. Wright's comments were not only wrong but divisive, divisive at a time when we need unity; racially charged at a time when we need to come together to solve a set of monumental problems -- two wars, a terrorist threat, a falling economy, a chronic health care crisis and potentially devastating climate change; problems that are neither black or white or Latino or Asian, but rather problems that confront us all.
.....
The church contains in full the kindness and cruelty, the fierce intelligence and the shocking ignorance, the struggles and successes, the love and yes, the bitterness and bias that make up the black experience in America.

And this helps explain, perhaps, my relationship with Rev. Wright. As imperfect as he may be, he has been like family to me. He strengthened my faith, officiated my wedding, and baptized my children.

Not once in my conversations with him have I heard him talk about any ethnic group in derogatory terms, or treat whites with whom he interacted with anything but courtesy and respect. He contains within him the contradictions -- the good and the bad -- of the community that he has served diligently for so many years.

I can no more disown him than I can disown the black community. I can no more disown him than I can my white grandmother -- a woman who helped raise me, a woman who sacrificed again and again for me, a woman who loves me as much as she loves anything in this world, but a woman who once confessed her fear of black men who passed by her on the street, and who on more than one occasion has uttered racial or ethnic stereotypes that made me cringe.
.....
In fact, a similar anger exists within segments of the white community. Most working- and middle-class white Americans don't feel that they have been particularly privileged by their race.

Their experience is the immigrant experience -- as far as they're concerned, no one's handed them anything, they've built it from scratch. They've worked hard all their lives, many times only to see their jobs shipped overseas or their pension dumped after a lifetime of labor.

They are anxious about their futures, and feel their dreams slipping away; in an era of stagnant wages and global competition, opportunity comes to be seen as a zero sum game, in which your dreams come at my expense.

So when they are told to bus their children to a school across town; when they hear that an African-American is getting an advantage in landing a good job or a spot in a good college because of an injustice that they themselves never committed; when they're told that their fears about crime in urban neighborhoods are somehow prejudiced, resentment builds over time.

Like the anger within the black community, these resentments aren't always expressed in polite company. But they have helped shape the political landscape for at least a generation.

And yet, to wish away the resentments of white Americans, to label them as misguided or even racist, without recognizing they are grounded in legitimate concerns -- this too widens the racial divide, and blocks the path to understanding.

This is where we are right now. It's a racial stalemate we've been stuck in for years. Contrary to the claims of some of my critics, black and white, I have never been so naive as to believe that we can get beyond our racial divisions in a single election cycle, or with a single candidacy -- particularly a candidacy as imperfect as my own.
 
#20
None of them will stop the obscene flow of billions of dollars / weapons to Israel, so it would have to be Ralph Nader if he stands.

There might then be hope for the Palestinian people.
 

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