Ian Wooldridge - RIP

#1
From the Mail:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=440044&in_page_id=1770

Ian Wooldridge, the greatest sports journalist of his generation, died peacefully in hospital last night after a long illness.

The man known as Woolers to his many friends and colleagues at the Daily Mail was 75 and, even after being taken ill, seemingly indestructible.

He was writing his incomparable column to the end, often in considerable discomfort.

After National Service, Wooldridge entered journalism on a local newspaper in Bournemouth and was working for the News Chronicle when it merged with the Daily Mail in 1960.

It was as a cricket correspondent that he first made his name. He adored the sport and the people in it, from Denis Compton, a true hero of his, to Richie Benaud, the former Australian captain and television commentator, one of his greatest friends.

But he covered every major sporting event for the Daily Mail, including ten Olympic Games, with an enthusiasm and lightness of touch that gained a worldwide following.

The awards piled up, testament to both his ability and his popularity. He was twice newspaper columnist of the year, five times sportswriter of the year and four times sports feature writer of the year.

There were two awards for his lifetime contribution to sports journalism and he was one of the first to be inducted to the newspaper Hall of Fame.

A committed royalist - the Princess Royal became a great friend - Wooldridge was awarded the OBE for his services to journalism. During his long and distinguished career, he flew upside-down with the RAF's Red Arrows formation team, hurtled down the Cresta Run at St Moritz and raced with the Alaskan husky dogs across the icy wastes of the Iditarod Trail. He also loved to run with the bulls in Pamplona.

He leaves a widow, Sarah, and three sons. A full tribute to the incomparable Wooldridge will appear in tomorrow's Daily Mail.

Rather more relevantly to us Ian made several Television series in 1980's about the forces. Most notable was the series about the MAWC and later a fascinating documentary giving an insight into the Naval Gun Run and the preparation for the competition.

Having done National Service, he greatly enjoyed any time that he subsequently spent with servicemen and held them in the highest regard.


Night old boy.
 
#3
Ian Wooldridge, the greatest sports journalist of his generation, died peacefully in hospital last night after a long illness.

The man known as Woolers to his many friends and colleagues at the Daily Mail was 75 and, even after being taken ill, seemingly indestructible.

He was writing his incomparable column to the end, often in considerable discomfort.

After National Service, Wooldridge entered journalism on a local newspaper in Bournemouth and was working for the News Chronicle when it merged with the Daily Mail in 1960.

It was as a cricket correspondent that he first made his name. He adored the sport and the people in it, from Denis Compton, a true hero of his, to Richie Benaud, the former Australian captain and television commentator, one of his greatest friends.

But he covered every major sporting event for the Daily Mail, including ten Olympic Games, with an enthusiasm and lightness of touch that gained a worldwide following.

The awards piled up, testament to both his ability and his popularity. He was twice newspaper columnist of the year, five times sportswriter of the year and four times sports feature writer of the year.

There were two awards for his lifetime contribution to sports journalism and he was one of the first to be inducted to the newspaper Hall of Fame.

A committed royalist - the Princess Royal became a great friend - Wooldridge was awarded the OBE for his services to journalism. During his long and distinguished career, he flew upside-down with the RAF's Red Arrows formation team, hurtled down the Cresta Run at St Moritz and raced with the Alaskan husky dogs across the icy wastes of the Iditarod Trail. He also loved to run with the bulls in Pamplona.
Never heard of him (and what the heck is cricket?), but that surely seems a life very well spent. :thumright:

RIP, sir.
 
#4
PartTimePongo said:
Ian Wooldridge, the greatest sports journalist of his generation
Whilst I'm sorry to see him go , wasn't that accolade appled to ex-PFF Mosquito leader Ken Wostenholme?

I have been wondering how to respond to your comment PTP, but I think that this link explains it far better than I ever could:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...all.html?in_article_id=440293&in_page_id=1779

and some of his articles:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...all.html?in_article_id=440308&in_page_id=1779


But as I said before we should remember him more as a great supporter of the forces.
 

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