I Sense A Demotion Off The Starboard Bow!

Yokel

LE
Better yet, just call it HMS Guardian and piss off the entire range of special interest groups. Make sure it’s carrying Trident.

There was an HMS Guardian - not that the readers of said paper would approve as she was an offshore support vessel (evil capitalists) later purchased by MOD and used as a patrol vessel in the Falklands (fighting a right wing dictatorship - bad).

I honestly don't know.

However, I'd guess that it has more to do with GRP MCMVs being very light, and the blast wave just lofted it slightly. That and the craft are small, so you wouldn't get differential loading in the same way as a larger metal hull.

Also, it's not so much that GRP is brittle as that it can be quite easily torn. Different material structure and properties.

That is enough Materials Science for one morning....
 
Thought they were scrapping the minehunters? He should get a medal for accelerating the process.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
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BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Shouldn't Her Majesty's Ships (un-magnetic) be made from Oak? It would be historically relevant and wouldn't increase the clutter of plastics in the ocean. I'm sure that Jolly Jack Tar would rather float around the 'oggin in oak.
 

Yokel

LE
Shouldn't Her Majesty's Ships (un-magnetic) be made from Oak? It would be historically relevant and wouldn't increase the clutter of plastics in the ocean. I'm sure that Jolly Jack Tar would rather float around the 'oggin in oak.

Hyacinth Bucket is that you?
 
Does the glass in GRP give it compressive strength, at the cost of brittleness?
I'd hazard a guess that the resin gives compressive strength while the glass fibres give tensile strength.

UV is used to cure (harden) the resin but, over time, UV weakens GRP. I suspect that had the same collision occurred 30 years ago, the hull would have bounced off the dock with hardly any damage but after nearly 40 years of exposure to daylight, the hull is getting a bit fragile and less tolerant of flexure.
 

Seadog

ADC
I believe that the Ton class were made of Mahogany.

@Dunservin or @Not a Boffin will confirm.
With the exception of HMS Wilton, the hull was mahogany, framing was aluminium. Engines started by 50 g of Mechanite. I crossed the the Bay of Biscay in one. Access to the machinery spaces and control room were direct from the upper deck - character building.
 
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Seadog

ADC
Probably a promotion, rather than a demotion. Thats the usual form. All done very discreetly of course. Kick Him upstairs, where He can do no more harm to the ships. ;)
A Officer of my acquaintance crashed his ship in a similar fashion. There was an Inquiry headed by a 1* and while the CO got the blame, it didn't do his career any harm. Promoted Commander in short order, then off to a brills job in London followed by Command of a bigger, much more warry ship. He finished up in one of our embassies. Although he wasn't the Naval Attache, it was a very nice posting indeed.


The Navy is quite forgiving about massive errors, treating them as learning opportunities. The example above is not the only example I have. Many of us have benefited from such leniency. Not me, oh, no, never.......
 
Promoted Commander in short order, then off to a brills job in London followed by Command of a bigger, much more warry ship. He finished up in one of our embassies.
Bloody Hell! How fast was the ship going?
 
HMS Chiddingfold?

Whatever happened to names like Dauntless, Vengeance, Fearless, Battleaxe. Or my favourite HMS Warspite.

Next will be HMS Walmington-on-Sea
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